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44

Boolean is an immutable value object. It was designed to be unchanging and made final in order to enforce that. java.lang.Boolean has been around since 1.0. AtomicBoolean is mutable, and designed to get updated so that the updated value is visible across threads. AtomicBoolean was introduced with Java 5. These are entirely different concepts, which is why ...


32

It would still make difference if the code throws Error. This is not caught within the code and therefore any part after try/catch/finally wouldn't be caught. If it's part of finally, it will be still executed even for Error. Secondly, if for whatever reason e.printStackTrace() throws an exception (although it would be very rare), the same will happen - ...


22

Sure - I don't know how useful it is, but it's certainly doable: import java.util.*; import java.util.function.*; import java.util.stream.*; public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { Supplier<Test> supplier = () -> new Test(); List<Test> list = Stream .generate(supplier) ...


21

Boolean is the wrapper class around the primitive boolean. It may be automatically created from a boolean by the compiler (boxing conversion) or converted to a boolean (unboxing conversion). This is not the case for AtomicBoolean where it is a separate class designed for concurrency purposes. Hence the two classes have different semantics at the language ...


18

Actually it was originally designed similarly to what you propose. See the early implementation in project lambda repository (makeResult is now supplier). It was later updated to the current design. I believe, the rationale of such update is to simplify collector combinators. I did not find any specific discussion on this topic, but my guess is supported by ...


16

Consider these cases where you're not returning a constant expression: Case 1: public static Val test() throws Exception { try { return doSomething(); } catch (Exception e) { throw new Exception("No!"); } // Unreachable code goes here } Case 2: public static Val test() throws Exception { Val toReturn = null; try { ...


14

If you already have a pre-allocated array, you can use a lambda expression to populate it using Arrays.setAll or Arrays.parallelSetAll: Arrays.setAll(persons, i -> new Person()); // i is the array index To create a new array, you can use Person[] persons = IntStream.range(0, 15) // 15 is the size .mapToObj(i -> new Person()) ...


13

Composition is favored over inheritance. The first pattern in your question is sort of a module configuration. The implementations of the Collector interface can provide out varying implementations for Supplier, Accumulator, etc. This means one can compose Collector implementations from a existing pool of Supplier, Accumulator, etc. implementations. This ...


11

You have to change "each" letter to an underscore. public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { String _answer = "HANGMAN"; _answer = _answer.replaceAll("[a-zA-Z]", "_"); // replace each letter with an "_" System.out.println(_answer); } O/P : _______ Note : You can also use (?i) to make it case -insensitive _answer = ...


9

You can get an iterator from a stream and then wrap the iterator into a Sequence: Sequence { stream.iterator() }


8

It's not a coincidence that the protected methods from Object are not available in a default method in an interface. Section 9.2 of the JLS states: If an interface has no direct superinterfaces, then the interface implicitly declares a public abstract member method m with signature s, return type r, and throws clause t corresponding to each public ...


8

This is the same behaviour as for other code blocks in Java. This gives a compilation error int a; { int a; } while this does not { int a; } { int a; } You can read about this topic in section 6.4 of the JLS, together with some reasoning.


7

while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) { line.replaceAll("(.{100})", "$1\n"); } First off, line.replaceAll does not replace your line variable with the result. Because Strings are immutable, this method returns the new string, so your line should be line = line.replaceAll(.... Second, you're never writing the new String back into the ...


7

The problem here is that 3^2 is not 3². Instead, it is 3 XOR 2. 11 //3 ^10 //2 ---- 01 //1 So the result is a negative number (1-8 = -7), and sqrt of that is NaN. So, you should either do 3*3 or (int)Math.pow(3,2)


7

It's because of the data type. When you do 1/2 that is integer division because two operands are integers, hence it resolves to zero (0.5 rounded down to zero). If you convert any one of them to double, you'll get a double result. double d = 1d/2; or double d = 1/2.0;


7

getWidth and getHeight are already defined in Component, a super class of JFrame. You should not override these methods. Rather, you should name your methods something different


7

I have a lot of trouble understanding the question. It seems that you lack the basic concepts of java as well as object oriented programming. I will try to explain: You have a class Swordsman, which can be instantiated to create swordsman objects. These objects will only see the content of itself. You have a class Boss which completely stands by itself. ...


7

It is evaluated, because you are passing value of second() by value, rather than just passing a reference to function itself. You need to do one of following System.out.println("GOT STRING: " + first().orElseGet(() ->second())); System.out.println("GOT STRING: " + first().orElseGet(this::second)); To delay the evaluation till it is really needed.


7

There are no contradictions in the output: Thread B can start, see that count is 0, build a string "threadB 0" and go to 'sleep'. Then, when he awakens, he prints it to console (though real count value is 6 by that moment) Thread C can do exactly the same with 6 instead of 0. Also, increment operation count++ is not atomic, count++ is equal to int temp ...


7

You can use the Stream API in Java 8 return list.stream().mapToInt(i -> i).sum(); The .mapToInt(i -> i) is required as Java doesn't know how to sum any object but it does know how to sum an IntStream and this converts the Stream<Integer> into an IntStream


7

You are correct that suppressing the exception does not result in losing information. Your co-worker's concern about that is groundless. The points of try-with-resources are: to make sure that resources get closed, regardless of what is thrown while using them, and in the reverse order in which they're declared, to make sure that exceptions thrown on close ...


7

@FunctionalInterface annotation is useful for compilation time checking of your code. You cannot have more than one method besides static, default and abstract methods that override methods in Object in your @FunctionalInterface or any other interface used as a functional interface. But you can use lambdas without this annotation as well as you can override ...


6

Its the difference between the characters 'd' and 'e' (ascii difference). This is the code of compareTo public int compareTo(String anotherString) { int len1 = value.length; int len2 = anotherString.value.length; int lim = Math.min(len1, len2); char v1[] = value; char v2[] = anotherString.value; int k = 0; while (k < lim) { ...


6

How did the deserialized object acquire the right static field value? Because the static field values have not changed between serialization and deserialization: You are running your test within the same application. Hence the static class members retain their value. The class iteself is not reloaded or re-initialized - it is still the same. You ...


6

As @AndroidEx correctly stated, assignments are not expressions in Kotlin, unlike Java. The reason is that expressions with side effects are generally discouraged. See this discussion on a similar topic. One solution is just to split the expression and move the assignment out of condition block: a = b if (a != c) { ... } Another one is to use functions ...


6

I expected the local-scope (inner-class-scope) Item will shadow the class-scope Item from Deque<Item> This is basically precisely what happened - the inner-scope Item shadowed the outer one. It does not matter that you've passed the outer Item to the constructor. The inner class has problems compiling because you're trying to assign a value of ...


6

If you divide something by 1...the remainder is always 0. % returns the remainder of dividing the left by the right.


6

You can't just cast a stream and expect it to become an array. Use the A[] toArray(IntFunction generator) method. Test[] a = Stream.generate(() -> new Test(x++, 0)) .limit(10) .map((Test v) -> { v.a = v.a * 2; return v; }) .toArray(Test[]::new);


6

Integer[] arr = {...}; Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(arr)); for Example : List<Integer> ran_num; public static void main(String[] args) { Integer[] arr = new Integer[1000]; for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { arr[i] = i; } Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(arr)); ...


6

Refer to JLS Section 12.2: Well-behaved class loaders maintain these properties: Given the same name, a good class loader should always return the same class object. ... A malicious class loader could violate these properties. However, it could not undermine the security of the type system, because the Java Virtual Machine guards ...



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