Hot answers tagged

28

This behaviour relies on a subtle difference between the evaluation process of method-references and lambda expressions. From the JLS Run-Time Evaluation of Method References: First, if the method reference expression begins with an ExpressionName or a Primary, this subexpression is evaluated. If the subexpression evaluates to null, a ...


23

Basically m.a += (m.function() ? 1 : 0) compiles into int t = m.a; // t=0 (bytecode GETFIELD) int r = m.function() ? 1 : 0; // r = 0 (INVOKEVIRTURAL and, IIRC, do a conditional jump) int f = t + r; // f = 0 (IADD) m.a = f // whatever m.a was before, now it is 0 (PUTFIELD) The above behavior is all specified in JLS 15.26.2 (JAVA SE 8 edition)


22

The erasure of the static type of items.get(0) is Object (since T is erased during compilation). Therefore items.get(0).getClass() returns a Class<? extends Object>, not a Class<? extends T>, which explains why your attempted assignment fails. This will pass compilation : Class<? extends Object> clazz = items.get(0).getClass(); If you ...


19

You have two operations operating on m.a in one call; in main m.a += (m.function()?1:0); pushes the value of a on the frame, and then invokes m.function() (which returns false), thus the ternary expands to m.a += 0; (and the value of m.a from the frame is added to 0 and stored in m.a). Thus the value is incremented in m.function() (and then reset in ...


12

Well, you could with a custom collector, for instance: double[] res = Arrays.stream(doubles) .collect(() -> new double[2], (arr, e) -> {arr[0]+=e; arr[1]+=e*e;}, (arr1, arr2) -> {arr1[0]+=arr2[0]; arr1[1]+=arr2[1];}); double sum = res[0]; double sumOfSquares = res[1]; but you don't gain much ...


11

tl;dr: Keep it simple. Use list.removeAll(new HashSet<T>(listOfElementsToRemove)); instead. As Eran already mentioned in his answer: The low performance stems from the fact that the pseudocode of a generic removeAll implementation is public boolean removeAll(Collection<?> c) { for (each element e of this) { if ...


10

Since Set is Collection we can use removeIf(Predicate<? super E> filter) method (for instance default one internally uses Iterator and its remove method just like in your second example). 409 default boolean removeIf(Predicate<? super E> filter) {410 Objects.requireNonNull(filter);411 boolean removed = false;412 final ...


10

Well, since removeAll checks for each element of tempList whether it appears in tempList2, the running time is proportional to the size of the first list multiplied by the size of the second list, which means O(N^2) unless one of the two lists is very small and can be considered as "constant size". If, on the other hand, you pre-sort the lists, and then ...


10

Your if conditions are not exhaustive. If a > b and b < c, none of the conditions will match, and your function will not return anything, which is why Eclipse is complaining. Add a default return statement at the end, either without a condition or in an else block.


10

3/2 is int division, which results in 1 (and casting it do double results in 1.0). Therefore you are dividing 320 by 1.0. Use 1.5 instead (or 3.0/2 if you must).


9

Make a Factory-Method for the super and subclass instead and make the constructors private, forcing everyone who wants an instance to use the factory method. A factory method is a method that returns a complety constructed instance. Once the instance is completely constructed (after the constructor was called in the factory method) add the instance to the ...


9

Every time? It's not applicable always, and it doesn't always make sense. Let's describe what that actually is: <?> is an unbound wildcard, which immediately implies two things: MyGeneric is a generic class, but You do not know what type it's holding (and it likely doesn't matter). It is preferable to the first expression in that the first ...


9

You only have one Point instance which you keep adding to the ArrayList, so all the indices of the ArrayList contain the same Point. To add a new Point each time the mouse is clicked, you should create a new Point instance : public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) { Point pointValues = new Point(); pointValues.setLocation(e.getX(), e.getY()); ...


9

Use following: <T> void onQueryCompleted(int token, List<T> songList); See Generic Methods for more details.


8

As the other answers explain why it doesn't compile I would use in your case the partitioningBy collector and fetch the resulting lists: import static java.util.stream.Collectors.partitioningBy; ... List<Integer> numbers = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 5, 9, 13, 21); Map<Boolean, List<Integer>> partition = ...


8

There's nothing wrong with your usage of while(rs.next()). The problem is that you keep overwriting the same devise instance with new values, thus losing the old ones. Instead, you should create a new instance on each iteration: while (rs.next()) { DetailCaisse detailCaisse = new DetailCaisse(); Devise devise = new Devise(); // Here! ...


8

An interface is just a class for which Class.isInterface() returns true. So: Class<?>[] foo = {Comparable.class, List.class, MyCustomInterface.class}; Note that there is no generic class instance for, e.g. List<String>: it's just raw List.class.


7

The problem is with generic type that is called String. It's collision between generic type parameter and actual class String. Because the type parameter String is unbounded, the Java compiler replaces it with Object hence arguments of method compare works as Object and object class doesn't have compareTo method hence you have to cast. Try below example ...


7

It is saying is that an int isn't necessarily implemented a 32-bit block of memory; it might be implemented, for example, as a 64-bit block of memory. You don't really need to care about this, from the perspective of your code's behaviour: all you need know is that it behaves like a 32-bit block of memory, e.g. it can only store values between -2^31 and ...


7

What is the advantages in creating interface for each object class ? There is no advantage at all. That is not what Interfaces are for. Should interface only contains 'getter' methods? Why not also the setter? As long as it is method, interfaces doesn't care about their functional behaviour. Why should I create for each object class an ...


7

Test6.FOO refers to Test6, but the field is a public static final String initialized from a compile-time constant, so it will be inlined by the compiler, and Test6 does not need to be loaded at all.


7

Use protected variables abstract class Car { protected int rpm; move(){ // ACCESS RPM HERE, which would be specific to implementing class } } class Ford extends Car { } class Dodge extends Car { } Since the variable rpm is now protected, it will be accessible to the sub-classes of Car and when you instantiate Ford or Dodge, it would have ...


6

Without looking at your code - two answers to two questions: So how realistic is it for a code amateur to write sound encryption? Unrealistic. Even professional cryptographer's implementations constantly get attacked, exposed, weakened. Apart from the math that needs to be solid, side channel attacks (e.g. in timing, power consumption) are possible and ...


6

Is there any way to compact this into one line using java 8's optional library? If you insist on using the Optional class, you could use Optional.ofNullable() and just pass it null if the condition isn't met: return Optional.ofNullable(fooA.size > 0 ? new Foo() : null); Note, however (as Holger correctly states) that using the Optional class ...


6

From the javadoc of String#replaceAll(String, String): Note that backslashes (\) and dollar signs ($) in the replacement string may cause the results to be different than if it were being treated as a literal replacement string; see Matcher.replaceAll. Use Matcher.quoteReplacement(java.lang.String) to suppress the special meaning of these ...


6

Because these collections rely on hashing, fields that contribute to their hashCode should be immutable. When a HashMap wants to store a key-value, it uses hashCode of its key and works out a place for the pair, The same technique will be used for elements retrieval ( ex: contains,get, etc..). Now imagine hashCode upon element retrieval produces a value ...


6

Here's your problem. If the user enters a non-number where you expect a number, your nextInt() will raise an exception but it will not remove the letter from the input stream! That means when you loop back to get the number again, the letter will still be there and your nextInt() will once again raise an exception. And so on, ad infinitum (or at least until ...


6

An Object[] ins't a Node[] - e.g., you could set an element of an Object[] to be "Hello Word", which you could not do with a Node[]. TL;DR, you should be creating a Node[]: Node<K, V>[] table = new Node[10];


6

JButton, JTextField, and JLabel inherit from JComponent which has the method setVisible, so you can have a method that takes an array of JComponent and sets their visibilities. public void setVisibility(boolean visibility, JComponent... components) { for(JComponent component: components){ component.setVisible(visibility); } }


6

Would this do the trick? Much less hacking is required: class Storage<T> { private T value; public Storage(T value) { this.value = value; } public T getValue() { return value; } }



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