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You might try void AssignmentExpression() : {} { LOOKAHEAD(UnaryExpression() AssignmentOperator() ) UnaryExpression() AssignmentOperator() AssignmentExpression() | ConditionalExpression() } Without seeing more of the grammar it is hard to know whether this will work. Since the use of the lookahead specification will suppress any warnings from JavaCC ...


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See Expression Parsing by Recursive Descent. Follow the "classic solution". Since you are using JJTree, the answer to the question Make a calculator's grammar that make a binary tree with javacc will be helpful.


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Here is a similar grammar PostfixEx --> FuncCall [PostfixEx'] | Primary [PostfixEx'] Primary --> ID PostfixEx' --> "++" [PostfixEx'] FuncCall --> FuncID "(" ")" FuncID --> PostfixEx | TypeSpecifier TypeSpecifier --> "int" So for example "ID ++ ( )" is ok, as is "int ( ) ++", but "int ++" is not allowed Here is one thing you can do. (a) ...


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First set the LOOAHEAD option to 1, so that JavaCC will warn you about lookahead conflicts. Your grammar has lookahead conflicts. The JavaCC processor should report these as warnings. You should heed these warnings. JavaCC, by default, uses the next token of input to make choices. See the documentation and the FAQ for details. Take void ...


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Some of your rules will be easy to deal with using only parsing. For example to find the number of lines in a function is not hard: void function() : { int firstLine, lastLine ; } { {firstLine = getToken(1).beginLine ; } ... {lastLine = getToken(0).beginLine ; } {check( lastLine - firstLine + 1 <= 150 ) ; } } Other rules, such as ...


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Will you put the code to look it or your complete call. I think, that it´s a code error or that you call a bad .java archive. For example: I have: Mytokens.jj and javaCode.java ok? Good, you need said: javacc Mytokens.jj javac javaCode.java java javaCode <test1.txt> I give you my *.bat for the test. You create a new txt and write it: CALL javacc ...


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You can use a method that skips all the tokens until the argument one: void error_skipto(int kind){ ParseException e = generateParseException(); System.out.println(e.toString()); Token t; do { t = getNextToken(); } while (t.kind != kind); } and then call it in a non-terminal method: void block(): {} { try{ < ...


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Autogenerated code is usually correct, but hardly ever looks elegant. It's difficult enough to generate correct code without worrying about elegance. Plausible guesses: The { is there because at that point, the generator doesn't know whether it'll need it or not; it will learn soon but "soon" is not "now". The throw is there because at that point the ...


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Your file structure should look like this where .../bin is some directory on your unix path .../bin/ javacc jjrun jjtree lib/ javacc.jar Of course the three jj* files should be executable. In a terminal enter which javacc. Presumably the answer will be /usr/local/bin. Look for a directory called ...


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In general you should avoid TokenMgeErrors. Usually this can be accomplished with a "catch all" rule -- see the FAQ for details. Now you are left with a ParseException. You can deal with these using try-catch. See the JavaCC documentation for information on that.


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What I would suggest is that you parse the range statement with something like the following. void rangeStatement() : }{ Token tk ; } { <RANGE> tk=<STRING_LITERAL> { reparse( tk.image ) ; } ... } I.e. accept any string as a range string and then parse the contents of the range string with a second parser.


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Update As Gunther pointed out, my original solution was not correct due to this paragraph in 7.4 of the spec: Comments behave like white space and are discarded except that, if a MultiLineComment contains a line terminator character, then the entire comment is considered to be a LineTerminator for purposes of parsing by the syntactic grammar. I'm ...


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It's not clear from your question what should happen if the string xyz is present. Should a TokenManagerError be thrown or ParseException? Usually in JavaCC it is good practice to accept all input at the lexical level --i.e. to write a token manager that throws no exceptions. So that's what I'll do. TOKEN: { < BAD : (["x","y","z"])* "xyz" ...


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Fun! \b(?:(?!xyz)[xyz])+\b Match, between word boundaries, a sequence of one or more of x, y, or z, none of which are start the sequence xyz. (Tested with perl -nE ' say for /(\b(?:(?!xyz)[xyz])+\b)/g '.)


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You can leverage the discard technique by using a regex like this: [xyz]*xyz[xyz]*|([xyz]+) Working demo The idea behind this regex is to match the invalid data but to capture the important data. The match information is: MATCH 1 1. [7-12] `xyyzx` MATCH 2 1. [13-20] `yyxzyxz` MATCH 3 1. [21-26] `yyzzx` As you can see, you have to grab the ...


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For the first case, your pattern needs to allow 1-digit numbers, 2-digit numbers, 3-digit numbers whose first digit is 1 and whose second digit is in the range 0-7, and the special case 180. The regex would look like [0-9]{1,2}|1[0-7][0-9]|180 (I don't know javacc, so I don't know how this regex would be used, or whether you need something else to ...


0

I'd suggest that you return list of Formals from nt_FormalList. public List<Formal> nt_FormalList() : { LinkedList<Formal> fl = new LinkedList<Formal>(); Formal f; } { [ f = nt_Formal() {fl.add(f);} (<COMMA> f = nt_Formal() {fl.add(f);})* ] { return fl; } }


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I'm guessing that you don't want a "space" at all, but rather that you want no tokens. In Java "" and " " are both valid formal parameter lists; no space is required. So I think what you want is public void nt_FormalList() : {} { [ nt_Type() <IDENTIFIER> (nt_FormalRest())* ] } The square brackets indicate that the stuff in between is optional.


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The problem is that < end_number: ~[] > : DEFAULT matches any character that is not an e. What you want to match instead is an empty string. Try < end_number: "" > : DEFAULT I think the following will work. TOKEN : { < (["0"-"9"])+ > : STATE_NUMBER0 } <STATE_NUMBER0> TOKEN : { < "e" > : STATE_NUMBER1 } ...



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