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7

To do this without adding an inline onload attribute to all the images/videos/etc you will have to observe the DOM for changes. Then on every change, you have to fetch all the new media and add the onload event to them from the callback. To prevent checking each element every time, once they've been loaded you could mark them as such by adding a ...


5

That's because this in the click handler refers to the window object not the clicked element. You are passing the clicked element to the handler, use it: function systemMenuRevealModule(el) { $('.module_function span').css('display', 'none'); $(el).find(".module_function span").css('display', 'block'); } An alternative without using onclick ...


5

When you click a submit button in a form the click event spawns on the button and bubbles up. The submit event spawns on the form (not the button) and bubbles up from there. If you stop propagation on the click event you're just stopping the bubbling phase of the click event. This has no effect on the submit event. To stop the submit action you have to add ...


4

e.target is the element the user clicked, it is showing undefined since the <span> does not have a data-value attribute. You could go up the tree and find the nearest ancestor that does contain a data-value. document.getElementById('container').addEventListener('click', function(e) { // Find nearest ancestor with data-value defined var node ...


4

See the handler $('button').on('click', function(e) { e.stopPropagation(); Note that the event is click, so you're stopping the click event from propagating up the chain, and that doesn't interact with the submit event at all, that still fires as the default action of a submit button is to submit the form, and the way to stop that is to prevent that ...


3

And addEventListener doesn’t actually delegate the events for you, it just searches for delegated events, is this correct? No. It does absolutely nothing with event delegation, but can be used as part of event delegation. The addEventListener method adds an event listener to a DOM node, which responds when the event bubbles up to, or propagates down to, ...


2

Try this: var p = $('#log')[0]; $("#textarea").on("keypress", function(e) { p.textContent = ''; var k = e.keyCode || e.which; var character = String.fromCharCode(k); if (!isNaN(character * 1)) { p.textContent += 'character is numeric'; } else { if (character == character.toUpperCase()) { p.textContent += 'UPPER case ...


2

One approach would be to fade the element out over the course of, say, a second rather than immediately, which gives the user time to complete the click before the button moves: $(this.parentElement).fadeOut("slow", function() { $(this).remove(); }); Live example: $('button').click( $('<li><input></li>') ...


2

When you refer to a a fully ajaxed website, I think a SPA -- Single Page Application. The distinction may be semantics, but AJAX implies DOM manipulation, while SPA implies Templating and Navigation. HTML templates are loaded when your page is loaded. Each template maps to particular navigation route. The major changes are NOT with event mapping, but with ...


2

Why [doesn't bubbling work on detached elements]? To answer your first question, I looked at the W3C "UI Events (formerly DOM Level 3 Events)" spec, and didn't see anything that addressed this issue specifically. However, the event phase portion mentions a few things that makes this behavior seem reasonable. As the next step, the event object must ...


2

From the discussion, The problem is when the event is triggered the handler is not yet added to the dom. So making sure that the event handler is added before the event is fired will solve the probelm


1

You can use replaceWith instead. $('iframe').load(function () { var $newText = $('iframe').contents().find(".newtext"); $newText.replaceWith( $newText.text() ) }); The window load event executes a bit later when the complete page is fully loaded, including all frames, objects and images.


1

It seems that you're adding the 'Ready' listener after dispatching the 'Ready' event on the first run. Now when you fire of the second run, the first listener will be called. This explains why 'Wrote Second' is logged after 'Wrote Third' is called. Move the addition of the listener to the beginning of writeStuff(). function writeStuff(first, second, ...


1

Use a callback inside your function to get the size: function imageSize(filename, callback) { funcResult = false; var img = new Image(); img.onload = function() { var myResult = { width: img.width, height: img.height } callback(myResult) } img.src = filename; } And use it: ...


1

Have you tried just .trigger() ? jQuery trigger() from their docs: $( "#foo" ).on( "custom", function( event, param1, param2 ) { alert( param1 + "\n" + param2 ); }); $( "#foo").trigger( "custom", [ "Custom", "Event" ] ); So for your implementation: $(document).trigger('task-modal-data-loaded',[{ source: 'ajax', message: 'Task Modal ...


1

You're just changing the background of the droppable, not actually moving the draggable. If you want to move it then add the following lines to dropped function: var data = ev.dataTransfer.getData("Text"); ev.target.appendChild(document.getElementById(data)); if you just want to change the display of draggable, then try this: var data = ...


1

To prevent the form posting your function must return false. form.onsubmit = function(event) { event.preventDefault(); return false; }


1

As Manish pointed out, both overriding the submit function and calling the submit form in javascript was complicating how the event was propagating. So added a hidden button in to the form in javascript and called the button's click function instead of the form submit function. WHich seems to have worked even it it feels rather like a kludge! Many thanks for ...


1

For image and other sort of media, you should use "onload" event so that you can call adjust height after that. Example: <img src="someimage.png" onload="loadImage()" > <script> function loadImage() { // code to adjust heights } </script> Here is the standard version: var img = document.querySelector('img') function ...


1

Use input instead of button for the button. that way the input will remain focus when you click on the button, but not outside. Your selector for the .focus() event will have to include both the input and it's button, in my example below I have simply selected ALL inputs. You will need to change this. $(function(){ $('input').focus(function(){ ...


1

Debugged. In JSFiddle it's still not working, but at least there aren't mistakes in your JavaScript anymore. Tried in JSBin:--->http://jsbin.com/vabewefubi/1/edit?html,js,output function checkname() { alert("Isee ur java script"); var myName = document.getElementById("name1"); var pos = myName.value.search(/^[A-Z][a-z] $/); if (pos !== ...


1

I added an id to the button: <%= button_to "Delete Account", user_path(@user), method: :delete, data: {confirm: "Are you sure?"}, class: 'button',id: 'del-button' %> and added this script: <script> document.getElementById("del-button").onclick = loseFocus; function loseFocus() { document.getElementById("del-button").blur(); } ...


1

You can't put a .on() handler on the prototype like you are doing. The EventEmitter part of your object doesn't even know it's there and no event handler has been registered with the EventEmitter base object. Instead, you need to install the event handler AFTER you've instantiated the object so that the EventEmitter has a chance to actually register the ...


1

Use before() or .after() jQuery methods. $('#span1').after('<span id="span2">newcontent</span>"); or a better approach, var $span = $('<span>', { 'id' : 'span2' , 'text': 'Newcontent'}) $('#span1').after($span); Demo


1

You're using getElementsByClassName to fetch an array of elements that match your class name. When binding your events, you correctly use the [0] index of that array to grab the first item in it: squares1[i].addEventListener("click", changeColor); However, in the checkColors() function you try to grab the backgroundColor of the entire array: ...


1

because this code: function checkColors(){ if (squares1.style.backgroundColor=='rgb(255, 0, 0)' && squares2.style.backgroundColor=='rgb(255, 0, 0)'){ squares3.style.backgroundColor='rgb(255, 0, 0)'; gotIt; } else if (squares1.style.backgroundColor=='rgb(255, 0, 0)' && squares2.style.backgroundColor=='rgb(0, 0, ...


1

Get elements by class name returns an array of elements. You need to specify which one. Try squares1[0] etc.


1

Basically I want to know if it would be possible to change...to...or something of the sort. Yes, and the way you did it is how you would do it, other than typos. E.g.: if (a && b) { if (c) { foo(); } } is equivalent to if (a && b && c) { foo(); } I found this page. ...


1

If you can produce a small demo showing the onMouseEnter / onMouseLeave or onMouseDown / onMouseUp bug, it would be worthwhile to post it to ReactJS's issues page or mailing list, just to raise the question and hear what the developers have to say about it. In your use case, you seem to imply that CSS :hover and :active states would be enough for your ...


1

Add the audio tag into the on call to allow event delegation. $("#container").on('ended', 'audio', function() { console.log("this never gets called"); }); http://api.jquery.com/on/



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