Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Are you using something akin to CoffeeScript? You forgot the {} on the object. First I suggest you return a proper object: var foo = function(){ { prop1 : "value" }; } Still it won't work. It will result in: foo.prop2 = "value2"; { [Function] prop2: 'value2' } foo() will return { prop1: 'value' } foo.prop2 will return value2 The reason it ...


3

That's because the grammar of functions in javascript doesn't allow for it. What you need is just a plain object. Is there a different syntax to add properties to a function object directly in its body. Yes. There is. And it's called a constructor function. function Foo(){ this.prop1 = "value"; } var obj = new Foo(); console.log(obj.prop1);


-4

Because you have used a semi colon. You do it using a comma. Correct usage would be: var foo = { prop1 : "value", prop2 : "value" }


0

var deepEqual = function(a, b){ var aProp = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a); var bProp = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(b); if(aProp.length !== bProp.length){ return false; } else{ for (var i = 0; i < aProp.length; i++) { if(typeof a[aProp[i]] === 'object' && typeof b[bProp[i]] === 'object'){ deepEqual(a[aProp[i]], ...


3

You're using recursion but not checking to see if a recursive call has failed. Try this instead: if (!deepEqual(a[aProp[i]], b[bProp[i]])) { return false; }


4

You're not doing anything with the recursive call to deepEqual. You can check its result, and return false if there's no match: var deepEqual = function(a, b){ var aProp = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a); var bProp = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(b); if(aProp.length !== bProp.length){ return false; } else { for (var i = 0; i < ...


2

AFAIK, there is no built-in implementation of such a function. However I've found this after a quick search on Google: http://json2html.com/ Seems pretty much similar to what you'are asking for.


2

Although what you've posted doesn't look valid, your objects are in arrays so you can use .concat var a = [{id: 0, name: "Zero"}]; var b = [ [{id: 1, name: "one", firstName:"First"}], [{id: 2, name: "two", firstName:"Second"}], [{id: 3, name: "three", firstName: "Third"}] ]; var c = a.concat(b); if there is no reason why your objects are in ...


0

I find it easier to not use any special libraries for this sort of looping, especially when using coffee script which has such nice loops. foundKey = null for key, urls of urlSets if 'url-a.com' in urls foundKey = key console.log foundKey #=> a It uses a for key, value of object loop to easily loop over your urlSets object, and then a if item ...


-1

You already tried to use... var obj = {a:1, b:2, c:3}; for (var prop in obj) { console.log("o." + prop + " = " + obj[prop]); } If is useful, see: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/for...in


0

The things in your elements array (Element, Window) aren't instances of a class. They're just objects. That means they don't have a prototype anymore than a = {}; has a prototype. If you change those strings to point to class definitions, then your code should work. So... var elements = { "Element": { class: Element, events: ["focus","blur"] }, ...


2

Try this: SUM(CASE WHEN YEAR = "2013" THEN REVENUE::NUMBER ELSE 0 END) AS revenue2013, SUM(CASE WHEN YEAR = "2014" THEN REVENUE::NUMBER ELSE 0 END) AS revenue2014


0

There's a couple of things at play here. An array element must exist before it can be manipulated. Consider this code - var my = []; my[0].id = 1; // TypeError: Cannot set property 'id' of undefined This is because exactly as the error states, my[0] is undefined here. Since your array is passed into a function, do one of the following (depends upon the ...


0

array[index+iii].id = (array[index].id * 4)+iii; In that, If array[index+iii] is undefined before, Then array[index+iii].id would give that error you've mentioned. So before accessing id check whether the property exists. if(!array[index+iii]) array[index+iii] = {}; // initializing if its not present. array[index+iii].id = (array[index].id * 4)+iii;


1

You are sending the SelectedCustomer as the entire object in the POST body. change your function to return { SelectedCustomer: model }; function retrieveEditCustomerModel(form) { var model = new Object(); model.CompanyID = $(form).find('.customer-stored-id').attr('data-value'); model.CompanyName = ...


0

The reason it can happen is that you havent set attribute [HttpPost] to your controller.


2

You could as well utilize the pure d3 way which is shorter and saves you from having to deal with accessing the array yourself: function dataGroupGradient(dataGroup) { var sum = d3.sum(dataGroup, function(value) { return parseFloat(value.gradient); }); return sum/dataGroup.length; } There may be an even briefer approach since you seem ...


0

This is just the ol' <= instead of < problem. For any array, arr[arr.length] is undefined. (arr[arr.length - 1] is the last element). Change your function to use < like so: function dataGroupGradient(dataGroup) { var sum = dataGroup[0].gradient; for (var i = 1; i < dataGroup.length; i++) { sum += parseFloat(dataGroup[i].gradient); ...


0

Here is what I ended up using: function listGuns(guns) { for (var speargun in guns) { // modify the log message here console.log("Behold! " + speargun + ", with " + guns[speargun]["heft"] + " heft!"); }


0

You need to get a reference to the gun from the property name like this: var rockSpearguns = { Sharpshooter: {barbs: 2, weight: 10, heft: "overhand"}, Pokepistol: {barbs: 4, weight: 8, heft: "shoulder"}, Javelinjet: {barbs: 4, weight: 12, heft: "waist"}, Firefork: {barbs: 6, weight: 8, heft: ...


0

I this case you don't need iterate the array. Not map, not reduce, not transform. All you need is the old pluck _.object(_.pluck(some_object_array, 'id'), some_object_array);


0

If you are having trouble solving any kind of problem always debug it. Simple way to do it is by using console.log() The issues is that macItems.item does not work and you need to use macItems[item] notation Return statement is also have flipped logic in there. macItems.item should have lower value than money that is passed in to return true i.e Air cost ...


0

You might want to use bracket notation since you're passing a string as your property referrer: return macItems[item] <= money; also make sure to use <= if you want to test for affordability: function canIGet(item, money) { return { "MacBook Air": 999, "MacBook Pro": 1299, "Mac Pro": 2499, "Apple Sticker": 1 ...


6

The problem is that you don't call the constructor. The right call is: bookarrays.push(new Bookdes("Gasoline Car", "Johnny Walker", 200, 31, "true"));


2

Functional programming techniques, which may seem a little imposing at first, often make problems like this simpler. Using Ramda (disclosure: I'm one of the authors; but these techniques are available in many other functional programming libraries) you can do things like this: var countAvailable = R.pipe(R.filter(R.propEq('available', 'true')), ...


0

Live Demo //constructor function function Bookdes(title, author, pages, current_page, available){ this.title = title; this.author = author; this.pages = pages; this.current_page = current_page; this.available = available === 'true'; } //array of books var bookarrays = [ new Bookdes("Fast Cars", "John Burns", 205, 43, "true"), new ...


0

Check this fiddle for live demo //constructor function function Bookdes(title, author, pages, current_page, available){ this.title = title; this.author = author; this.pages = pages; this.current_page = current_page; this.available = available; } //array of books var bookarrays = [ new Bookdes("Fast Cars", "John Burns", 205, 43, ...


3

Put simply, you can't make something into a function if it's not already a function, and you can't really extend arrays. What you can do is create a wrapper function that wraps an array and provides the functionality you want, and also include the ability to get back the original array if you need it: var wrapper = (function() { function ...


1

This is because you are adding the same variable every iteration of the loop. Try changing your push like this: SubAssessmentScores.push({ Parent: P, Value: V }); That said, I recommend you study a little more javascript and conventions in the language, for example your variable naming is frowned upon because you should only use capital letters on ...


2

No, accessing a property with the name length does not invoke the .toString() method. It accesses the length property. If you want .length to be easily accessible, you can include it: var foo = { valueObj: { value: 'hello', toString: function() { return this.value; }, get length() { return this.value.length; } }, get ...


2

this.valueObj doesn't have a length property. Asking for its length property does not cause an auto-conversion to a string (while concatenating a string does cause a cast to string). If you do need to use that exact syntax (and cannot first perform a cast to a string), then the easy solution is to add a length getter to valueObj. var foo = { valueObj: ...


1

Calling foo.val.length then should invoke the custom toString method of valueObj No. foo.val returns an object. And attempting to access the property length of that object won't call the toString method. But you can use expr + '' to coerce to string, which will call toString: (foo.val+'').length


1

Inside a constructor function this refers to the obj being created .so this.charAt(0) is incorrect.since Object object does't have charAt method up in its prototype chain.(strings and array has this method).i think you are tryin to do. this.letter1 = this.transitivity.charAt(0); this.letter2 = this.transitivity.charAt(2); this.letter3 = ...


0

var src = [{"name": "Adam", "age": 25}, {"name": "Barbara", "age": 23}]; var obj = {people: src};


0

How it works is , function createObject(proto) { function ctor() { } // assigns prototype of Person to ctor's prototype ctor.prototype = proto; // return new instance of ctor return new ctor(); } // Usage: Student.prototype = createObject(Person.prototype); So, it creates new object constructor with prototype assigned as prototype ...


0

Since you are just concerned with whether something exists or not, you can use the Array.Some function. It still loops through the array, but will stop upon hitting the first instance that is true. Your method is basically doing the same thing already, but this way it a bit cleaner, since it uses the actual elements of the array (instead of an index). ...


1

service.currentUser.authorities is an array this is why you're getting an integer for perm in for(perm in service.currentUser.authorities). The other problem is that you can't compare all the properties in the object using === (including prototype properties), so you need to compare explicit the values for the properties... or create a custom function to ...


2

You currently are check a object with another object, is best check the string with the string, below show an little example of the same function but using the some method from arrays; var currentUser = {"authorities":[{"role":"gebruikersbeheer"},{"role":"kijken"},{"role":"plannen"}]}; function hasPermission(permission) { return ...


1

The reason is simple. Since you are accessing this within the click event callback of jquery element, this points to the element on which the event has occurred. You can change add slight change in the code to make it work, check the jsfiddle below. http://jsfiddle.net/satyagupta/efohyekq/ Test.prototype.foo = function() { var data = this.data; ...


7

The problem is that this inside the event handler refers to the element targeted by the handler; you can use a closure variable to hold the object reference like Test.prototype.foo = function () { var self = this; $("body").append($("<div>") .text("Hello World!") .click(function () { alert("Data: " + self.data); ...


0

I have researched this a bit. MDN is silent on the issue, and so is the spec (ES5, ES6). They only state that the property accessor must be a string, without any qualifications – in other words, there is no limit as far as the spec is concerned. That's hardly surprising. How browsers handle it, is another matter. I have set up a test and run it in a ...


2

change php code as told in others answers too and it should be like $rows2 = array(); while($r2 = mysql_fetch_assoc($result2)) { $rows2[$r2['ccode']] = $r2['colour']; } if it does not work then try this: $rows2 = array(); while($r2 = mysql_fetch_assoc($result2)) { $rows2["'".$r2['ccode']."'"] = $r2['colour']; } if it also does not work then ...


2

change this code while($r2 = mysql_fetch_assoc($result2)) { $rows2[] = $r2; } to this one: while($r2 = mysql_fetch_assoc($result2)) { $rows2[$r2['ccode']] = $r2['colour']; }


1

Another possible structure using closures and not objects at all This structure also can be nested creating private static variables It has no use of the word this var thing = function(private_var){ function get(){ console.log(private_var) } function set(z){ private_var = z } return { get:get, set:set } } ...


1

I think you need a bit better understanding of how objects and prototyping work in Javascript. Consider you have a use case where you want an object that represents a user, and stores their first_name. Without using any functions, you can simply create an object with your desired properties: var person = { first_name: 'joel' }; This is a standard ...


1

The new [Function] keyword does many things, but the main things it does are: Creates a new object Uses [Function]'s prototype as the parent prototype for the new object Executes the contents of [Function], using this as a reference to the new object If you call such a function without new, the this reference will be determined the way it would usually ...


2

Using the new keyword when you call a function sets the context (this) inside the function to be a newly instantiated object, rather than window or some other context, which is why you can assign to this.firstName inside the function, and then refer to it as person1.firstName. Without using the new keyword, the value of this WONT be a blank object, so you ...


1

This is quite simple if you look at the operation more closely. You have one object, assume $scope.newsList = {} $scope.newsList = { "status": "ok", "count": 2, "count_total": 4231, "pages": 2116, "posts": [ { "id": 62296 }, { "id": 62297 }, { "id": 62296 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included