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8

At first the question seems interesting. Then I looked at what 1/10000000 is. < 1/10000000 > 1e-7 Therefore: < parseInt("1e-7"); // note `parseInt` takes a STRING argument > 1 If you want to truncate to an integer, you can do this: function truncateToInteger(real) { return real - (real % 1); }


8

getElementsByTagName returns a collection of elements (like an array), so you have to specify the index of the one you want. If you only have one use [0] document.getElementsByTagName('textarea')[0].value = "<p>Content</p>"; jsFiddle example Note that you can't render HTML in a textarea though, only text.


7

setTimeout is always executed in the global scope, as it's really window.setTimeout (or more accurately WindowTimers), so inside the callback this will be the window, not the element. You have to store a reference to the element $(document).on('click', '.button-disabled', function (){ var element = $(this); element.prop('disabled', true); ...


6

As inline styles do not overrule !important external styles unless also !important themselves, and jQuery does not support setting that flag on animations, you're essentially screwed. However, you just shouldn't use JS animations anymore now that CSS transitions are standardized just fine. Add the following CSS: #my_image { transition:width 1s, height ...


5

It's because the elements are gotten when the page loads, and the event handler is attached at that moment, changing the class later doesn't remove the event handler. The solution is to either check for the class inside the event handler $(".changer").on("click", function(){ if ( ! $(this).hasClass('open') ) { $(this).addClass("open"); ...


5

parseInt expects to parse a string argument, so converts it to a string first. 1/1000000 when converted to a string is "0.000001", parseInt then ignores everything from "." onwards, since it is for integers only, so it reads it as 0. 1/10000000 is so small that converting it to a string uses scientific notation "1e-7", parseInt then ignores everything from ...


5

This is ES6 Destructuring. More specifically Object Destructuring. Components should be something like this: {classes: 'asdf', interfaces: 'qwer', utils: `zxcv`} Then you get three constants (defined with const, which is readonly after assignment): Cc // 'asdf' Ci // 'qwer' Cu // 'zxcv'


4

The image tag is used inside svg elements, for HTML use img tag and they are self closing tags <img src="" />. It's not InnerHTML, it is innerHTML and you don't even need to use it in your case. To set the alt attribute of the img, simply use asdfjkl.alt. var asdfjkl = document.getElementById('asdfjkl'); var num = 0; setInterval(function() { ...


4

Remove the third argument from the function you pass to each since: The each won't pass anything into it It masks the variable of the same name in the wider scope that you assigned the object to


4

You need to have two separate script tags: <script src="<?php echo base_url(); ?>js/jquery.min.js"></script> <script> function activate_match() { // var tnmt_id = "hip hure"; alert("tested"); //Get the id of the tournament selected in the list } </script> If script has src attribute its inner ...


4

No, there can be no race condition. The asynchronous task could complete before you start listening to the event, but that doesn't matter. The completion of the task creates an event, and that event won't be handled until the function (or code block) ends and the control is returned to the browser.


4

the postfix increment is indeed evaluated first, before the comparison, and so the preference table is correct. But the value of the postfix increment evaluation is not the incremented value, it's the value before incrementing. This is, as Adam pointed out, the intended behaviour of postfix increment.


4

var i = 399.99; function decrease() { i -= 0.25; document.getElementById('decrease').innerHTML = "$" + i; } <body> <p id="decrease">$399.99</p> <button type="button" onclick="decrease();">Start Now!</button> </body>


4

Start by returning promises from the functions instead of using callbacks function animation1(){ var div1 = $("<div />", { css : { position : 'absolute', left : '0px', top : '0px', width : '10px', height : '10px', background : 'red' } ...


3

It is formal and common to use the first style. So always try to use the formal style of any kind of code. So It is not a problem to be discussed ...


3

Please try this: just change type="button" to type="submit" /> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /> ...


3

I believe the 1.5 is 1.5x line-height. Refer to the line-height property in CSS.


3

myObject is an array, hence you should do it like: alert(myObject[0].receipt.orderId)


3

That's how the post-increment operator works. It uses the variable in the expression, and then increments. If you want the increment to happen first, you would use the pre-increment operator like this: console.log(++i === k);


3

You need a "hit-test" mechanism. It works like this: keep contours of your shapes in a JS structure have a single surface on your graphics receive all mouse click events when the surface is clicked, use the passed coords to find which shape got hit in (1) Alternatively, switching your graphics into vectors will provide this functionality out of the ...


3

Do you have the outline paths of the heart, lungs, etc? If yes, you just use context.isPointInPath to hit-test each of your organs. If no, you can draw each organ onto its own canvas and then use context.getImageData to hit-test whether the pixel under the mouse is opaque for any particular organ-canvas. Here's an example of hit-testing with the pixel ...


3

you are not returning el from the function when you call __shorthandCss() nothing is returned on which css() function is present as an property so you need to return el on which you have assigned css() var __shorthandCss = function(sel){ var el = document.querySelectorAll(sel)[0]; console.log(el); el.css = function(attrs){ for (var attr in ...


3

Use jquery .one() http://api.jquery.com/one/ <script> $(document).one("click",function() { window.open("http://google.com", "_blank");}); </script>


3

The order of arguments in the controller function has to match the order in the parameter array. You have mixed the order of $http and $location. So change your function signature to app.controller('ContactsController', [ '$scope', '$http', '$location', 'contactsService', function ($scope, $http, $location, contactsService) {


3

Try this code jsfiddle remove height from css and use below code $('<p>Text</p>').appendTo('.container'); remove # and put dot(.)


3

Use a common class. Then you can use Class Selector (“.class”) to bind event HTML <div class='myDiv' id="div0">div0</div> <div class='myDiv' id="div1">div1</div> <div id="say"></div> Script $("#say").append("Which div are you going to click? "); $(".myDiv").on("click", function () { $("#say").append(this.id); }); ...


3

You can put your selectors in an array var selectors = [#id_name_details_prefix_title', '#id_name_details_first_name' ...]; and then add/remove class $(selectors.join(',')).addClass('kmw-disabled')


3

It seems that the input you are passing to myfunc is being considered as String. Have a look at this answer. Keys in Javascript objects can only be strings? Try this, var should = require('should'); function myfunc(x, cb) { var y = x + 1; var z = x + 2; cb([y, z]); }; describe('.mymethod()', function() { this.timeout(10000); it('should return ...


2

It's because google & yahoo expect the url to have query strings of "?to=" instead of "?mailto=" See this question for more details


2

You cannot render HTML inside a text area as it is for input. You can only render text



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