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7

view_list.style.visibility = (val === true && optval === 'car') ? 'hidden' : 'visible'; In a ternary statement, you have a few different parts: var = statement ? value_if_true : value_if_false var is optional. You don't have to include it if you don't want to worry about assignment, but in general this is what ternaries are most often used for. ...


6

You need event delegation for handling events to dynamically added DOM . Event delegation allows us to attach a single event listener, to a parent element, that will fire for all children matching a selector, whether those children exist now or are added in the future. try this: $(document).on("click",'.close-more', function (e) { ...


5

setTimeout(incProgress(), 300); You are calling the function and passing its return value (undefined) to setTimeout. You need to pass a function to setTimeout. Remove the ().


5

It doesn't check the answers2 array because (answers[i] || answers2[i]) this expression evaluates answers[i] first, and that is Truthy (non empty string), so that is returned. Since || short circuits, the answers2[i] is never evaluated at all. Correct way to check this would be to use Array.prototype.indexOf, like this if (answers.indexOf(userAnswer) ...


5

In Jquery $() is a selector, if you say : $(document).ready(function(){ }); it means that execute the block inside that function when my document is loaded complete on the browser, but what you write : $document().ready(function(){ ... }); is wrong syntax and is not valid in jquery. this should work with length: $(document).ready(function(){ ...


5

I'd probably do it with JavaScript's curiously-powerful && operator (the cousin of the curiously-powerful || operator you're already using): var topLevel = testdata['key']; var nextLevel = topLevel && topLevel['subkey']; // ... If topLevel is falsey (null, undefined, and so on), nextLevel will get that falsey value (the left-hand operand); ...


5

Commented first, but actually that's the answer XD No, it it not possible. The reason is because by writing this.foo = this, you are ensuring that this.foo and this are the exact same thing. Since they are the same thing, trying to tell them apart is rather like this surreal joke: Q: What's the difference between a duck? A: One of its legs is both the ...


4

(attrs = {})[key] = val; is equivalent to attrs = {}; attrs[key] = value; That is, the variable assignment in the expression happens first and then the object (the result of the assignment) is modified via a normal property assignment. I would personally use the latter form here.


4

You can set the product_options of row2 like this: row2.product_options = [ { id: 87, value: 10 } ]; To explain: product_options is a key in row2. It's value is an array with a single element that is an object with the keys id and value.


4

your nl2br() is most likely translating <script type="text/javascript" > alert("hello"); </script> to <script type="text/javascript" ><br/> alert("hello");<br/> </script><br/> and breaking the JavaScript code.


4

In native JS: var classNames = document.getElementById('145').className.split(/\s+/); console.log(classNames[classNames.length - 1]) // 'BBB' Or even shorter: (Suggestion by mplungjan) var classNames = document.getElementById('145').className.split(/\s+/); console.log(classNames.pop()) // 'BBB' Of course you can make it a one-liner: ...


4

try..catch will catch exceptions which occur at runtime. But Syntax errors occur during parsing time itself. So, when the code $(document).trigge rHandler('fbload'); is encountered, JavaScript tries to parse the expression. But it couldn't. So it is clueless and fails immediately with SyntaxError and that is why it is not caught by the except block.


4

Have a look at the operator precendece of JavaScript. The && operator binds stronger than the || operator. You can circumvent this behaviour by adding parantheses to your conditions. if ( (fixA == "Mouse" || fixA == "Ball") && (fixB == "Mouse" || fixB == "Ball")) { console.log("Ball hit mouse"); }else if ( (fixA == "Trap" || fixA == ...


4

2 levels of mistakes here. One is operator precedence: // your code fixA == "Mouse" || fixA == "Ball" && fixB == "Mouse" || fixB == "Ball" // how it works (fixA == "Mouse") || ((fixA == "Ball" && fixB == "Mouse") || (fixB == "Ball" )) // what I assume you wanted (fixA == "Mouse" || fixA == "Ball") && (fixB == "Mouse" || fixB == ...


4

String "one two three four " has a trailing space, which adds one extra empty string to the end of the resulting array, i.e. ["one", "two", "three", "four", ""]. In order to fix the problem consider using trimming function, like $.trim() in jQuery.


4

You could try doing something like this: var total = 0; for ( var i = 1; i <= 30; i++ ){ total += parseFloat( document.character[ "input" + i ].value ); } document.getElementById( "output" ).innerHTML = total; All I am doing here is using the variable i to assemble the key for the character object. The value is added (for each iteration) to the total ...


4

You can use indexOf(), it returns the first index at which a given element can be found in the array, or -1 if it is not present. Use if([25, 26, 27, 28].indexOf(myVar) > -1) ) {//do something}


4

HTML <button data-bind="enable: isFormValid">My Button</button> <input type="text" data-bind="value: text1, valueUpdate: 'keyup'" /> <input type="text" data-bind="value: text2, valueUpdate: 'keyup'" /> <input type="text" data-bind="value: text3, valueUpdate: 'keyup'" /> <input type="text" data-bind="value: text4, ...


4

Ajax is asynchronous, so the first time you click, the console log happens before the ajax call has completed, and it logs null. The second time you click, the same thing happens, but the variable is global, so it now holds the value from the previous ajax call, and that's what's logged, the value from the previous call, not the value from the current ...


4

http://underscorejs.org/#range _.range(10); => [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] _.range(1, 11); => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] _.range(0, 30, 5); => [0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25] _.range(0, -10, -1); => [0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9] _.range(0); => []


4

You could just return a deferred, that way the done() callback won't generate errors, and you can choose to resolve it or not if(items.length > 0){ return $.ajax({ url: 'response.php?type=getDelivery', type: 'POST', data: {content: items} }); }else{ var def = new $.Deferred(); def.resolve(false); return def; } ...


4

You should be using the onfocus and onblur events. onfocus - fires when the user is in the textbox onblur - fires when the user leaves the textbox In the onblur event you add document.getElementById("search2").style.boxShadow = ""; The click event only fires when the user clicks the element.


3

I don't think there is a recommended test, but I just wrote one, and I'll recommend it var is_scoped = (function(s) { s.setAttribute('scoped', 'true'); return !!s.scoped; })(document.createElement('style')); to be used as if ( is_scoped ) { // scoped styles are supported } FIDDLE currently scoped styles is only supported in the latest ...


3

try wrapping the loaded javascript like this to wait for the html to be loaded <script type="text/javascript"> $(function(){ console.log('Initial run'); $('#test').on('click',test); function test() { console.log('button clicked'); } }); </script>


3

Here's a very simple method: function getRandomRgb() { var num = Math.round(0xffffff * Math.random()); var r = num >> 16; var g = num >> 8 & 255; var b = num & 255; return 'rgb(' + r + ', ' + g + ', ' + b + ')'; } for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) { console.log(getRandomRgb()); } jsFiddle Demo Console output ...


3

try this: ^([0-9a-z]{4}|)$ would match an alphanumeric of 4 characters or an empty value. here is an example EDIT: If you want to match also uppercases, add A-Z to the pattern: ^([0-9a-zA-Z]{4}|)$


3

Mixing jquery and angularjs (esp in controllers) will result in much pain down the road. This can be done easily via angular. ngRepeat creates a child scope which allows this to work. <ul id="postsList"> <li ng-repeat="post in posts"> <button class="deleteButt" ng-click="showConfirm = !showConfirm" ...


3

So Jacob, the problem here is just that before rendering your view, you need to wait the response from the server. Your this.model.id will be undefined because your model is new, that means that it was not saved in the server yet. So, what you could do is to work with the success callback from the .create function. I believe that something like this would ...


3

Because, in the first case, during the compile time itself, second myInternalFunction replaces the first myInternalFunction in the current scope. It means that, only the second myInternalFunction function exists in the myFunction's scope. But in the second case, the functions are created during the execution only. By the time alert was executed, only the ...


3

A variable’s declaration is hoisted, but not its definition. So your second example is equivalent to: function myFunction() { var myInternalFunction myInternalFunction = function() { return "Hello World." } return myInternalFunction() myInternalFunction = function() { return "Second Definition." } } Here it becomes obvious ...



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