Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

You could write your own serializer. For example import java.io.IOException; import java.text.SimpleDateFormat; import org.codehaus.jackson.JsonGenerator; import org.codehaus.jackson.JsonProcessingException; import org.codehaus.jackson.map.JsonSerializer; import org.codehaus.jackson.map.SerializerProvider; public class ResponseSerializer extends ...


0

Just set the response attributes: r[r.myDate] = r.data; delete r.myDate; delete r.data;


1

You only have WRAP_ROOT_VALUE which is for serialization. Remember serialization is POJO to JSON. The SerializationFeature.WRAP_ROOT_VALUE is the one that actually adds the "create_session_param" when creating the JSON. We need JSON to POJO, which is deserialization, which has its own feature set. In this case, we need a feature to unwrap the root value in ...


0

The class WebApplicationException was designed for that but for some reason it ignores and overwrites what you specify as parameter for the message. For that reason I created my own extension WebAppException that honors the patameters. It is a single class and it doesn't require any response filter or a mapper. I prefer exceptions than creating a Response ...


1

The first thing you need to do is to suspend the resource method: ResourceMethod.Builder methodBuilder = resourceBuilder.addMethod(httpMethod) .suspend(AsyncResponse.NO_TIMEOUT, TimeUnit.Seconds); Then you have few choices how to process the request in async mode: "Arbitrary" handler class builder.addMethod("GET") // Suspend without time ...


0

I don't know if this is going to help, but I found this works for me. Inside my serializer I override the handleType() method like so: public class MapToTuple extends JsonSerializer<Map<String, Property>> { @Override public void serialize(final Map<String, Property> map, final JsonGenerator jgen, final SerializerProvider ...


0

You could use the Arquillian Framework for such kind of tests. Besides the Arquillian Core lot's of extensions are available. For your use case I would use the Arquillian Drone Extension and the REST Extension (if you are using restful services after the login). Arquillian Drone allows you to write client side tests for web sites and with the rest extension ...


0

One way is to use an HTML parsing library, like jsoup. Here's a complete example, using Jersey Test Framework. You can run it just like any other unit test import javax.ws.rs.Consumes; import javax.ws.rs.POST; import javax.ws.rs.Path; import javax.ws.rs.Produces; import javax.ws.rs.client.Entity; import javax.ws.rs.core.Application; import ...


0

I agree with Vinay Sahni and DannyMo that this is the best approach: /users/{id} /users?email={email} /users?name={name} But sadly most of the REST API documentation frameworks (like Swagger and apiblueprint) do not suport this. They tell that you can't have more than one resource in the same path (querystring doesn't count as a "path"). So, if you have ...


0

MOXy doesn't handle maps well as it uses JAXB under the hood, and JAXB sucks with Maps. Use Jackson instead. Get rid of the MOXy dependency. MOXy is the default, so if it is on the classpath, it will be used over all others. Once you take it out, Jackson will be used. UPDATE So the drill-jdbc-all actually repackages both Jackson 1.x and Jackson 2.x. You ...


0

You cannot serialize collections and maps. Create a container class. For example: @XmlRootElement public class Container { public Map<String, String> data; } public Container getMap() { Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>(); map.put("some key", "some value"); // wrap content int container object ...


0

Consider following Rest Interface. We define Annotation "Produces" which can generate different format type output. In your case APPLICATION_JSON will generate JSON and APPLICATION_XML will generate XML format. So decide accordingly. package : javax.ws.rs.PathParam; @GET @Path("/helloRest") @Produces({MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON, ...


1

So in your filter you are reading the InputStream from the ContainerRequestContext. So now the stream is empty. That means no data left for when the method param deserialization is done. One way around this is to buffer the entity before reading it. We can do that by casting the ContainerRequestContext to ContainerRequest, which will give us many more ...


1

See 405 Status Code 405 Method Not Allowed The method specified in the Request-Line is not allowed for the resource identified by the Request-URI. The response MUST include an Allow header containing a list of valid methods for the requested resource. Your endpoint is for a @POST request. In your client you are trying to get(). See the Client ...


0

The framework should not throw an exception. The user should handle the response however they see fit. This is the same with any client. The Response object will contain all the context you need to handle the response however you see fit. So what you should do is get the Response first Response response = target .request() ...


2

I assume you startup a tomcat? if yes you could specify a servlet in your web.xml that you load on startup: see this example from crunchify: <servlet> <servlet-name>CrunchifyExample</servlet-name> <servlet-class>com.crunchify.tutorials.CrunchifyExample</servlet-class> ...


2

Found it! This is the answer I was looking for: see the updated beans.xml file: <bean id="jacksonObjectMapper" class="org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper"> <property name="serializationInclusion" value="NON_NULL"/> </bean> <bean id="jsonProvider" class="org.codehaus.jackson.jaxrs.JacksonJsonProvider"> <property ...


1

You could add @JsonSerialize(include = JsonSerialize.Inclusion.NON_NULL) on top of your POJO class. This would ignore the null fields for that one class. Or you could configure the ObjectMapper so it would apply globally ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.setSerializationInclusion(JsonSerialize.Inclusion.NON_NULL); If you go with the ...


1

By default, Jackson does not wrap the JSON object with the root name, as you are expecting We can configure it to do so though. We can do that by configuring Jackson's ObjectMapper ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.configure(SerializationFeature.WRAP_ROOT_VALUE, true); // maintain JAXB annotation support mapper.registerModule(new ...


2

So this can be accomplished with a ParamConverter/ParamConverterProvider. We just need to inject a ResourceInfo. From there we can obtain the resource Method, and just do some reflection. Below is an example implementation that I've tested and works for the most part. import java.lang.reflect.Type; import java.lang.reflect.Method; import ...


1

MessageBodyReaders aren't used for @QueryParam. You seem to be expecting the Jackson MessageBodyReader to handle this deserialization, but it doesn't work like that. Instead you will want to use a ParamConverter, which will need to be registered through a ParamConverterProvider. For example: @Provider public class LocalDateParamConverterProvider implements ...


2

As nobody knows the relation between the author field and the URI this can't happen automatically. With the plugin reasteasy-links you can define these relations with the two annotations @AddLinks and @LinkResource. You can find more information in the docs. This plugin does not change the value of the field but will add atom links to the entity. Also it ...


0

In your hibernate.cfg.xml, check for the following property, property name="hibernate.connection.url" jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/benchresources property If it exists then create a database in MySql(if you're using mysql) with the name 'benchresources'


1

In the end I decided to just configure and deploy 2 Jersey servlets. V1 of the API is in module_v1, V2 in module_v2, and I have two servlets with 2 ResourceConfig. The first resource config defines the path 'v1', the second 'v2', and they are both relative to the root of 'api'. This works quite well and allows for simple deletion of any of the versions.


0

For folks still looking for a solution, here is the complete code on how to save jaxrs response to a File. public void downloadClient(){ Client client = ClientBuilder.newClient(); WebTarget target = client.target("http://localhost:7070/upload-0.0.1-SNAPSHOT/rest/files/download"); Response resp = target ...


0

Changing .configure(SerializationFeature.WRAP_ROOT_VALUE, true) to .configure(SerializationFeature.WRAP_ROOT_VALUE, false) should help. According to javadoc: Feature that can be enabled to make root value <..> wrapped within a single property JSON object, where key as the "root name"


0

Don't mix Jersey Major versions. They are not compatible, i.e <dependency> <groupId>com.sun.jersey</groupId> <artifactId>jersey-server</artifactId> <version>1.8</version> </dependency> <dependency> <groupId>com.sun.jersey.contribs</groupId> ...


0

This issue is resolved now. What I had to do is create a custom interceptors. This will catch the fault occurred while bean validation and add actual bean validation error instead. Please check the InInterceptor code below --> @Provider public class IamServInInterceptor extends BeanValidationInInterceptor implements ContainerRequestFilter{ private static ...


0

As far as I know there is no such way but you can easily read a configuration file on your own. Assuming following file: com.foo.bar.Filter1 com.foo.bar.Filter2 You can register the filters like this: List<String> filters = Files.readAllLines(Paths.get(new URI("/your/config/file")), Charset.forName("UTF-8")); Client client = ...


0

Method overloading, as in your example, works (tested in Apache-cxf 3.0), but the client must not send a Content-Type: application/xml header when he wants to hit the method without the entity in the signature. If another media type is already defined at the class level, annotate the method with @Consumes(MediaType.WILDCARD), see the example below. ...


0

In Apache-cxf 3.0, you can use a ParamConverterProvider to convert a parameter to a Date. The following code is copied from my answer to this question. public class DateParameterConverterProvider implements ParamConverterProvider { @Override public <T> ParamConverter<T> getConverter(Class<T> type, Type type1, Annotation[] antns) ...


0

Create new maven project: File > New > Project > Maven Edit the pom.xml and add the needed dependencies (for REST, etc.) This is all you need to work with RESTful services. You can add REST Web Services support with: Right-click on the project (project tool window on left) > Add Framework Support > Java EE > RESTful Web Service The problem is that ...


2

I have created a simple maven project to produce the war file with the 2.19 jersey shared library for weblogic. I have tested it with weblogic 12.1.3 You can clone from here weblogic-jax-rs After cloning run mvn package to produce the war and then deploy it to the server. Of course you must specify the new implementation version in your weblogic.xml which is ...


0

I have created a simple maven project to produce the war file with the 2.19 jersey shared library for weblogic. You can clone from here weblogic-jax-rs After cloning run mvn package to produce the war and then deploy it to the server


0

There are several ways to achieve this. The simplest way is to use @JsonTypeInfo, as Garry mentioned. All you have to do is annotate your abstract base class with a @JsonTypeInfo(use = Id.CLASS, include = As.PROPERTY) and you should be good to go. Another way is to make sure all mappers on both the server-side and the client-side have (likely NON_FINAL) ...


0

The resource classes are request scoped by default, meaning a new one created for each request. In your case, since you want the db to persist, you need only a single instance for the entire application. If you register the resource class as an instance, that will make it a singleton. Or depending on what implementation you are using, you might be able to ...


0

If all you want is to return an arbitrary concrete instance, this "just works", when using Jackson-based provider. This is the default for JSON with DropWizard. The only problem that may occur is if using plain Jersey, and JAXB-based provider, which may limit serialization to API exposed by abstract type. If you also need to be able to deserialize (on ...


0

<dependency> <groupId>javax.ws.rs</groupId> <artifactId>javax.ws.rs-api</artifactId> <version>2.0-m10</version> </dependency> This version has support for javax.ws.rs.MessageProcessingException class.


2

You can try to add JsonTypeInfo and JsonSubTypes annotations @JsonTypeInfo(use = Id.CLASS, include = JsonTypeInfo.As.PROPERTY, property = "type") @JsonSubTypes({ @Type(value = MySubClass.class) }) public abstract class MyAbsClass { .... } public class MySubClass extends MyAbsClass { .... } It should add the type info to ...


1

Below is a proof-of-concept for one way to accomplish this. I have never used this, so I can't really provide any testimony to any maintainability issues that may or or may not come down the line for larger projects. I just tested on a simple project. It basically uses Jersey's Programmatic resource building API to append the version to the original path. ...


0

It appears that an additional dependency for jersey-media-jaxb is needed in order for the custom ContextResolver to be picked by jersey. Then the standard JAXB mechanisms are used to define the JAXBContextFactory from which a JAXBContext instance would be obtained. In this case the JAXBContextFactory class is specified in jaxb.properties file in ...


2

TL;DR Remove the @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON) on the retrieveJob method. For one, it does not accept a body, so it does not consume anything. Secondly it conflicts with the expected behavior. I've tested with both Jersey and RESTeasy and it seems to be a difference in implementation. Jersey works fine with your code, while RESTeasy always hits ...


0

None of the other answers worked for me, but this did: import javax.ws.rs.core.Response; Then change the return type of the service method to Response, and change the return statement to: return Response.ok(resp).header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*").build(); Where resp is the original response object.


3

In case anyone ever has the same problem: The problem was that I created the location header through an injected @Context UriInfo uriInfo using its .getAbsolutePathBuilder(). The approach was working in a synchronous server because the thread which accessed the UriInfo still had the same Request context. However, when I switched to an async approach, the ...


0

Percepiton's answer was very useful, but ParameterHandler has been deprecated in Apache-cxf 3.0, see the Apache-cxf 3.0 Migration Guide: CXF JAX-RS ParameterHandler has been dropped, please use JAX-RS 2.0 ParamConverterProvider. So I add an example with the ParamConverterProvider : public class DateParameterConverterProvider implements ...


0

I think you will have to call the second API using REST service call, using API's like Apache HTTPClient or something similar. Regards, Hunaid.


1

The service key is to give access to the API, not individual users. So take twitter for example: twitter users log in with username and password and don't need a service key. But if you wanted to build your own twitter platform where users can log in to your page and see their tweets in your app (like tweetdeck), you'd need to get a service key to use the ...


0

Are you sure that when @PostConstruct methods are invoked the ServletContext is already available? If you need to use it in a service, try to inject it directly as a method parameter. Otherwise try with a ServletContextListener


0

Sorry, I'm not good at English. Somebody had the same question said it's problem about jaxrs-1.1 which should be updated to jaxrs-2.0, but I don't know how to update it. It's default in Liberty 8.5 Server. I hope this will be useful for you. Using JAX-RS 2 Client API in Liberty and Bluemix Removing JAX-RS feature from Websphere Application Server 8.5


0

I found the problem. The problem was the jar version files.



Top 50 recent answers are included