Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You can use an XmlAdapter to convert the XMLGregorianCalendar to a String with the format you want. You will need to write the logic for this into the adapter.


0

You have roleName and externallyDefined mapped with @XmlAttribute instead of @XmlElement. Debugging Tip When your object model doesn't unmarshal as expected, populate it and marshal it to XML, then compare the output with your input.


0

I tried @blaise-doughan's suggestion and added the @XmlTransient annotation to top of my abstract base class. With my environment (so my product depends something strictly), the jaxb-api library says "The annotation @XmlTransient is disallowed for this location" because of the version of it high probably older than 2.1. I realized that when I tried to ...


0

This is the way to write a class for marshalling with attributes having arbitrary names. public class Row { private Map<QName,Object> any; private String name; private String type; @XmlAnyAttribute public Map<QName,Object> getAny(){ if( any == null ){ any = new HashMap<QName,Object>(); } return any; } ...


2

First You don't need your own MessageBodyWriter/Reader. Jersey/JAX-RS alread has standard support for this. I would stick with the default, unless you have a really, really good reason for needed to whip up your own. Second We don't need the wrapper, you can simple return a GenericEntity. This will automatically wrap the elements in a "plural wrapper" ...


0

To run a webservice Tomcat deployment may be not the simpliest way. If you need keep it simple you can build a usual J2SE application and run it as a single jar. Java 6 and above already has everything necessary for this including an integrated http server. Take a look at this code: Main class: package com.qnium.test.webservice; import ...


0

Yes initially it doesn't support on namespace in JAXB. On using gensor jar it worked.


0

I do not use Eclipse. I use Netbeans. For your prupose https://netbeans.org/kb/docs/websvc/rest.html is the best approach because it demonstrate the steps that you want to achieve. You also mislead some concepts. Acordding to Oracle Documentation (which I strongly advice) - https://docs.oracle.com/javaee/7/tutorial/ JAX-RS is a Java programming language ...


0

Jackson does not support JAXBElement, as it is very much XML-specific and is difficult to make work with other formats: Jackson JAXB support is focused on using information from annotations to make things work, but goal is not to be a full JAXB implementation. As such your best bet is to do what @lexicore suggests and try to avoid use of JAXBElement.


0

First of all you have to specify Value as a RootElement. Since it contains many children nodes you have to specify its contents as an array of Objects. You can't use @XmlValue, you have to use @XmlAnyElement(lax=true) @XmlRootElement @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD) @XmlType(name = "") class Value { ...


0

I solved it by using <id xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xsi:type="xs:string">myID</id>


1

When marshalled as the root object an instance of String needs to be wrapped in a JAXBElement to provide the root element information (same as for any class without an @XmlRootElement annotation. When marshalled as a field or property value the containing element is normally derived from the containing field/property so a JAXBElement by default is not ...


1

The defaultValue property on the @XmlElement annotation, is what a JAXB (JSR-222) implementation should swap in for the value of an empty element. Their appears to be a bug in the reference and MOXy implementations of this when that element is mapped to a property annotated with @XmlList. Domain Model Root Here is a sample class with 3 String and 3 ...


0

This question has an answer now. I have collaborated with James (the OP, @ja6a) and together we have developed the JAXB2 SimpleEquals Plugin and JAXB2 SimpleHashCode Plugin which generate runtime-free reflection-free equals(...) and hashCode() methods. As there's no additional runtime dependencies, this is compatible with GWT. Examples of the generated ...


2

You can use binding files to somewhat achieve that: Use <jaxb:schemaBindings map="false" ... /> to disable generation for the whole namespace/schema Use <jaxb:class ref="com.acme.foo.Ignore"/> to map "unwanted" classes to some (existing) com.acme.foo.Ignore class.


1

Where Did the Abstract Class Come From? JAXB would generate an abstract class to correspond to an abstract complex type in the XML Schema. In the example below the complex type contactInfo would correspond to an abstract class called ContactInfo, also the generated class Customer would have a property of this type. <xs:schema version="1.0" ...


1

See this question: wrapper class missing when using xjc on xsd You don't get a class for GetPatient because JAXB handles it via the JAXBElement<GetPatientType> construct. You can, however, customize GetPatient to generate a class via the <jaxb:class name="GetPatient"/> customization. But still, that class will not have the fields, it will ...


1

You can use below schema <xsd:simpleType name="LayerRate_T"> <xsd:annotation> <xsd:appinfo> <xjc:javaType name="org.acme.foo.LayerRate" adapter="org.acme.foo.LayerRateAdapter" /> </xsd:appinfo> </xsd:annotation> </xsd:simpleType> when include binding configuration into your ...


1

I fixed by this replacing <xsd:annotation> <xsd:appinfo> <simplify:property name="timeOrEventOrLocation"> <simplify:as-element-property /> </simplify:property> </xsd:appinfo> </xsd:annotation> in my bindings file with: ...


1

Leverage An XmlAdapter You could create an XmlAdapter to get the behaviour you are looking for. An XmlAdapter converts a domain object into another type for the purposes of marshalling and unmarshalling. import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAttribute; import javax.xml.bind.annotation.adapters.XmlAdapter; public class BooleanAdapter extends ...


0

The XML output of your class is: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?> <myClass> <a>x</a> <b>xx</b> <c>true</c> </myClass> If you want the boolean value to result in <c value="true" /> then you need a wrapper element around the boolean c field. This can be of type ...


0

There appears to be a misunderstanding of JAXB's idea of a defaultValue in the original question (or quite frankly, just a bug). This piece of code explains it: import static java.lang.System.out; import static javax.xml.bind.JAXB.unmarshal; import java.io.StringReader; import java.util.List; import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElement; import ...


0

Change your attribute in <xsd:attribute name="id" type="xsd:int" use="required"/> If you don't use required this attribute could be nillable and in java object only Integer can rapresent this concept. Reference here Since the attribute is optional there is a possibility that it may be nillable which would not be possible using a primitive. The ...


1

Options: Check your ObjectFactory for a method like createProducts(...). Use JAXBElement<Products>. Customize your element with <jaxb:class name="ProductsElement"/> - you'll get a ProductsElement with @XmlRootElement. You can also use jaxb2-annotate-plugin to add @XmlRootElement to your existing Products class. Update Here's a small example ...


0

There are two ways to solve your problem. First by global binding as suggest @lexicore <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?> <jaxb:bindings xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xjc="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb/xjc" ...


0

This is not directly an answer to your question, but possibly a recipe to achieve your goal. If you just want to get rid of the topmost JAXBElement, why don't you just customize XJC to generate an additional class for your Capabilities element? Something like: <jaxb:bindings node="xs:element[@name='Capabilities']"> <jaxb:class ...


0

Ok, so here is the adapter for edges: package tree.persistence; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Map; import java.util.Map.Entry; import javax.xml.bind.annotation.adapters.XmlAdapter; import tree.Pair; public final class EdgesAdapter<N, E> extends XmlAdapter<EdgesType<N, E>, Map<E, Pair<N>>> { ...


2

After one day of searching and despair and after posting this big question, after 5 minutes I found the solution. Hilarious!!! I was missing this dependency in my pom <dependency> <groupId>org.apache.cxf</groupId> <artifactId>cxf-rt-databinding-jaxb</artifactId> <version>3.0.1</version> ...


1

I will attempt to address the points you raised: //there is no getAnySubType() method! There wouldn't be. It isn't common object-oriented practice to have a method on a super class that returns an instance of a specific subclass. well somehow a few values that I need to get from the xml are inside hte AnySubType, but a getter for that type is ...


0

If you want to send JSON File, Please send the appropriate JSON file to the Rest Service and put the currosponding JaxB Object as a parameter to that service. REST will take autometically take care for the Marshelling and unmarshelling. Please make sure that , you need to change @Consumes(value=MediaType.APPLICATION_XML) ...


0

You need to register a message converter that is able to do that, pretty much as you have to do for any non trivial conversion. Since you're obviously using the default JmsListerContainerFactory, extend it to register a message converter for your listener, someething like: @Bean public DefaultJmsListenerContainerFactory jmsListenerContainerFactory() { ...


0

Your answer about wsdlLocation helped me, but since I can't comment yet, I will just add more info. As an option it is also possible to modify pom.xml and add wsdlLocation there <wsdlOption> <wsdl>${basedir}/src/main/resources/cxf/webservice.wsdl</wsdl> <wsdlLocation>classpath:cxf/webservice.wsdl</wsdlLocation> ...


0

You are on the right path to generate the JAXB. Click Here to see How JSR 303 Works with POC


0

If you are wiling to use another technology, JXPath can be used to navigate javabeans via something similar to xpaths. You can also use JXPath to poplulate javabeans with information http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-jxpath/ Specifically, when you supply a factory you can create objects. There are several situations that are not supported nativly, ...


0

I resolved this with replacing MOXy by jackson. Without any configuration the JSON marshalling worked out of the box.


3

Figured out my problem. So it appears that the ContextFactory settings needs to be changed as well. Previous value was: javax.xml.bind.context.factory=com.sun.xml.bind.ContextFactory_1_0_1 I changed it to: javax.xml.bind.context.factory=com.sun.xml.internal.bind.v2.ContextFactory And that took care of it.


1

The namespace specified on @XmlRootElement only applies to that element. If you want it to apply to all the elements you have mapped to, you can do it at the package level using the @XmlSchema annotation. package-info.java @XmlSchema( namespace = "http://www.ba.com/schema/BAserviceDeskAPI/incident", elementFormDefault = XmlNsForm.QUALIFIED) ...


1

Since all the possible values of the elements property are subclasses of Abs I would use @XmlElementRef. @XmlElementRef public List<Abs> getElements() { return elements; } @XmlAnyElement(lax=true) will give you the same behaviour but comes with the following limitations: An unexpected element is going to cause an instance of org.w3c.dom.Element to ...


1

Change your Set.java in ... import java.util.List; import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAnyElement; public class Set extends Abs { private List<Object> elements; @XmlAnyElement(lax=true) public List<Object> getElements() { return elements; } public void setElements( List<Object> elements ) { this.elements = ...


3

You will need to add a zero-arg constructor, or create an XmlAdapter for the Pair class to get it to unmarshal correctly (see: http://blog.bdoughan.com/2010/12/jaxb-and-immutable-objects.html). UPDATE I'm using JAXB marshaller for it and when I made a debugging of non-marshalled element, it has wrong type. ElementNSImpl instead of Integer. As far ...


2

You could do the following: XmlAdapter (MapAdapter) You could do the following for your XmlAdapter where you convert an instance of Map to an object that has a List of DOM Element. You will construct the instances of Element so that the name is they key from the map entry, and the text content is the value. import java.util.*; import java.util.Map.Entry; ...


1

What you are trying isn't possible in the way you are trying to do it. You could parse the XML with a StAX XMLStreamReader then peek at the attributes on the root element event, choose which class to unmarshal and then call the unarshal method that takes a Class and an XMLStreamReader as parameters.


0

Disclaimer: I am the author of the maven-jaxb2-plugin. Please file an issue here ans send me a sample project to reproduce (the best would be a pull request to tests. I'll be fixing this ASAP. I wonder how a passed systemId can be null but it's a bug anyway. Will be fixed ASAP, I just need a test project to reproduce. Update. The 0.12.2 release fixes ...


0

Since you have not defined namesapce in @XmlRootElement remove the namespace from the input. @XmlRootElement(name = "incident") @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD) @XmlSeeAlso({Event.class}) public class Incident extends Event { public Incident() { super("incident"); } //fields, getters and setters } And in ...


1

An object that you are adapting with an XmlAdapter doesn't need to a no-art constructor. You could set it up as follows: SemaphoreAdapter extends XmlAdapter<Integer, Semaphore> Then you would use the @XmlJavaTypeAdapter annotation on the property of type Semaphore to reference the XmlAdapter.


1

Your xml contains purpose not Purpose so change @XmlRootElement(name = "Purpose") to @XmlRootElement(name = "purpose") And add @XmlTransient on observers like this @XmlTransient private ArrayList<Observer> observers;


0

After further investigation it appears that I have the same problem as in this question: Maven not picking JAVA_HOME correctly The solution thanks to @rustyx (please upvote that answer): To fix the issue you need to start Eclipse using the JRE from the JDK by adding something like this to eclipse.ini (before -vmargs!): -vm ...


2

You can parse the XML with a StAX XMLStreamReader, then advance it to the element you want to unmarshal, and then unmarshal it. I posted a full example that should help on the related question linked below: How to unmarshall SOAP response using JAXB if namespace declaration is on SOAP envelope?


1

Simply add the root class in hierarcy. And get Office class from Root class. Root Class:- import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*; import java.util.Vector; @XmlRootElement @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD) public class Root { @XmlElement(name = "Office") private Office office; } Office class import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*; import ...


1

Why don't you create a generic root element? @XmlRootElement(name="Root" ...) public class Root { @XmlAnyElement(lax=true) private Object content; } Add it to your context and unmarshal. You should get a JAXBElement<Office> as content.



Top 50 recent answers are included