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15

The problem is that Jetty's AnnotationConfiguration class does not scan non-jar resources on the classpath (except under WEB-INF/classes). It finds my WebApplicationInitializer's if I register a subclass of AnnotationConfiguration which overrides configure(WebAppContext) to scan the host classpath in addition to the container and web-inf locations. Most ...


6

I was able to resolve in an easier but more limited way by just providing explicitly to the AnnotationConfiguration the implementation class (MyWebApplicationInitializerImpl in this example) that I want to be loaded like this: webAppContext.setConfigurations(new Configuration[] { new WebXmlConfiguration(), new AnnotationConfiguration() { ...


5

You normally don't provide the Servlet API yourself. This is normally to be provided by the target servletcontainer itself. Examples of Servlet 3.0 compatible containers are Tomcat 7.x, Glassfish 3.x, JBoss AS 6.x/7.x and, yes, Jetty 8.x. You just have to declare the <web-app> root element of web.xml to comply the highest version as supported by the ...


5

Jetty 9 has a refactored IO layer over Jetty 8 which should garner you improvements in that area. See this blog for information on how and why Jetty is a best of breed in this area. https://webtide.com/jetty-in-techempower-benchmarks/ Specifically look down for the latency tests where Jetty easily came out on top. [edit] I should note that this is ...


4

This project (https://github.com/guofengzh/jaspi-on-jetty) is a working example of the JASPI API in jetty that uses geronimo-jaspi which in turn calls back to the jetty-jaspi modules for the authentication. Geronimo seems to be providing the configuration mechanism and jetty the authentication modules themselves in this example. It seems as though you can ...


4

There is no support for this in the protocol but you could fudge something yourself. When your server completes a handshake, store the initial message you want to deliver to a client. In your client's onopen function, send a "read initial message" request. In your server, check that this client hasn't read its initial message; respond with the message; set ...


4

Jetty 9.0.1 contains an enhancement which allows for scanning of annotations of non-jar resources (ie classes) on the container classpath. See comment #5 on the following issue for how to use it: https://bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=404176#c5 Jan


4

i had the same problem when implementing partial documents update. i solved the problem by implementing PreemptiveAuthInterceptor. see below code PoolingClientConnectionManager cxMgr = new PoolingClientConnectionManager( SchemeRegistryFactory.createDefault()); cxMgr.setMaxTotal(100); ...


4

Use A Dos Filter http://wiki.eclipse.org/Jetty/Reference/DoSFilter. To enable it in Jetty.xml you would insert this code <filter> <filter-name>DoSFilter</filter-name> <filter-class>org.eclipse.jetty.servlets.DoSFilter</filter-class> <init-param> <param-name>maxRequestsPerSec</param-name> ...


3

Gradle's Jetty plugin is based on Jetty 6, which doesn't support Servlet 3.0. You may want to look into the Arquillian Gradle plugin or Gradle Cargo plugin instead.


3

Your tagging indicates that you are using Jetty 8, but your example references org.mortbay classes which would be coming from Jetty 6 prior to our move to eclipse several years ago. http://wiki.eclipse.org/Jetty/Feature/Hot_Deployment The ContextDeployer was replaced with a ContextProvider and a more powerful deployment lifecycle in Jetty 7/8. In Jetty 9 ...


3

Your tag says you are using jetty-8 but your proxy servlet class indicates jetty-6 (the org.mortbay.servlet.ProxyServlet). On jetty-8 the ProxyServlet you should be using is org.eclipse.jetty.servlets.ProxyServlet and yes, this all sounds like a perfectly normal use case.


2

That is not a leak per se. Please read this: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/javase/finalization-137655.html about finalisation mechanism in JVM. Finalizers can become a problem, if too many finalazble objects are created, in your case FileInputStream. You can try to decrease your heap size somewhat in order for Garbage Collector to run more ...


2

Bob, The bug tracker and all doco for jetty-7,8 and 9 is found over at Eclipse, here: http://www.eclipse.org/jetty/ IIRC, in jetty-6, despite having extractWar set to false, under-the-covers jetty was extracting and copying the WEB-INF directory to overcome issues under windows with hot redeployment. So even if you thought you weren't extracting the full ...


2

A "Context XML File" (as outlined in Configuring Security Realms) refers Webapp deployment using the ContextProvider (enabled by default on jetty-distribution). This deploys webapps by using a XML file, usually found in ${jetty.home}/contexts/ with a description of where that webapp is located on disk, and some details on how you want that webapp deployed. ...


2

Based on my testing and this thread http://forum.springsource.org/showthread.php?127152-WebApplicationInitializer-not-loaded-with-embedded-Jetty I don't think it works at the moment. If you look in AnnotationConfiguration.configure: parseContainerPath(context, parser); // snip comment parseWebInfClasses(context, parser); parseWebInfLib (context, ...


2

In our tests, QueuedThreadPool has shown to be faster than ExecutorThreadPool for usage with a connector. I would use QueuedThreadPool and experiment with ExecutorThreadPool only if you have performance problems caused by the thread pool (unlikely in our experience).


2

"Too many open files" usually means that your java process is not allowed to open any more file descriptors. However if this happens at startup of jetty w/o any big amount of connections opened something weird is going on. First of all you can check the configured soft limit of allowed open files (or filedescriptors) by executing: $ ulimit -a on your ...


2

Instead of implementing your own jetty handler you can try Jadler (http://jadler.net), an http stubbing/mocking library I've been working on for a while.


2

Looking at the information on Maven Central, it appears that the first time Jetty8 is used by cometd itself first shows up in the metadata for Cometd 2.7.0. However, it lists version 8.1.13.v20130916 as the one it uses itself, not version 8.1.11. For completeness sake, here's the metadata for Cometd 2.6.0, notice it has no jetty8 reference.


2

CometD 1.x is not maintained anymore; CometD 2.x is out since July 2010. I strongly recommend you to upgrade to CometD 2.x (current version 2.7.0), which will work fine with every Jetty 8 version, although I recommend you to use the latest Jetty 8, currently 8.1.14.v20131031.


1

Here's how to define custom error pages - http://wiki.eclipse.org/Jetty/Howto/Custom_Error_Pages


1

try naming it root.xml and your war file root.war


1

Afaik jetty is not an AS but a simple web server with a servlet container. Writing multithreaded code in a servlet container is ok. Futher reading: Difference between each instance of servlet and each thread of servlet in servlets? http://balusc.blogspot.co.uk/2010/06/servlet-lifecycle-and-multithreading.html


1

The code below did the trick in my maven project: public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { Server server = new Server(); ServerConnector scc = new ServerConnector(server); scc.setPort(Integer.parseInt(System.getProperty("jetty.port", "8080"))); server.setConnectors(new Connector[] { scc }); WebAppContext context = new ...


1

So this seems most easily solved without binding myself to Jetty too much by <error-page> in web.xml <servlet> <servlet-name>ErrorHandler</servlet-name> <servlet-class>device.webapp.ErrorHandler</servlet-class> </servlet> <servlet-mapping> <servlet-name>ErrorHandler</servlet-name> ...


1

EndPoint.flush() returns false if it couldn't write the whole buffers. Thus the caller knows it has to call flush again until all data has been written to the EndPoint. Have a look at WriteFlusher.write() and WriteFlusher.completeWrite() and read the javadocs there to get a feel of how it is used. Regarding the line: flushed|=super.flush(b); ...


1

The status messages are printed because of the line <statusListener class="ch.qos.logback.core.status.OnConsoleStatusListener" /> in logback-access.xml (etc/logbackAccess.xml in your case). By adapting OnConsoleStatusListener and OnPrintStreamStatusListenerBase, you should be able able to create a custom StatusListener which prints status messages ...


1

Simple enough HttpClient client = new HttpClient(); client.registerListener(RedirectListener.class.getName()); client.start(); // do your exchange here ContentExchange get = new ContentExchange(); get.setMethod(HttpMethods.GET); get.setURL(requestURL); client.send(get); int state = get.waitForDone(); int status = get.getResponseStatus(); if(status != ...


1

Yes, the defaults should be generally fine for what you describe. A quick tweak you can make is to set the number of acceptors to the number of cpu's you have. Aside from that you can always enable jmx and see how things look memory wise using jconsole to see something else might need to be tweaked. We have some OS related things mentioned on this link as ...



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