Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

74

First understand that Jigsaw's primary use case is to modularise the JRE itself. As a secondary goal it will offer a module system that may be used by other Java libraries and applications. My position is that something like Jigsaw is probably necessary for the JRE only, but that it will create far more problems than it claims to solve if used by other Java ...


47

Jigsaw and OSGi are trying to solve the same problem: how to allow coarser-grained modules to interact while shielding their internals. In Jigsaw's case, the coarser-grained modules include Java classes, packages, and their dependencies. Here's an example: Spring and Hibernate. Both have a dependency on a 3rd party JAR CGLIB, but they use different, ...


18

AFAIK The plan is to make the JRE more modular. I.e. have smaller jars which are optional and/or you can download/upgrade only the functionality you need. Its to make it less bloated and give you the option of dropping legacy modules which perhaps most people don't use.


15

It's simple, if you want to do real component-based development in Java today then OSGi is the only game in town. In my opinion, Jigsaw is a combination of a compromise of what's doable in the JDK and previous bad relationship between SUN and the OSGi guys. Maybe it will ship with Java 8, but we have to wait and see. OSGi is no panacea if you are working ...


14

As written in the comments already, Java 8 will not ship with Jigsaw. Maybe Java 9. Also, at JavaOne 2013 I attended a talk by Mark Reinhold and it sounded that the way Jigsaw is heading to is not generally open for Java developers, i.e. Jigsaw will be used by the JRE to modularize the JRE (read: rt.jar) itself but it's not supposed to be used by Java ...


10

I love your use of the phrase "corner cases" to describe the current situation. there are shortcomings with the JAR file specification that can lead to namespace resolution and classloading issues in certain corner cases Anyhow, since many years I've been interested in tools and techniques that supports the creation of and, even better, enforce, code ...


8

Citing http://blogs.oracle.com/mr/entry/jigsaw: OSGi is not at all integrated with the Java language, however, having been built atop the Java SE Platform rather than from within it. This last problem can be fixed. Sun plans now to work directly with the OSGi Alliance so that a future version of the OSGi Framework may fully leverage the ...


5

The rationale behind project Jigsaw and how it relates to OSGi was outlined by the Jigsaw team in Java Posse Podcast 259. These projects do not entirely overlap and the introduction of Jigsaw does not sound the death knell for OSGi - the scope of OSGi goes beyond anything Jigsaw will attempt. There's much more to Jigsaw than the OSGi team is in a position ...


4

Excellent question. My understanding is that in some areas OSGi goes way beyond that which is necessary for JVM modules (with all the corresponding complexity that brings) whilst in other areas it doesn't go far enough. So there's a lot of overlap between them but perhaps not enough. See this blog entry


2

It was not included in Java 8, and is highly unlikely that it will even be considered for Java 9. According this JavaFX page, JavaFX is the replacement for Swing: Is JavaFX replacing Swing as the new client UI library for Java SE? Yes. However, Swing will remain part of the Java SE specification for the foreseeable future, and therefore ...


1

Check out the JavaPosse interview with Mark Reinhold on the subject.


1

One feature is missing in OSGi. It does not support modules that are subsets of packages. The export is done on the package level. Package subset modules are the only way to cut the Gordian knot of JDK dependencies. And a nice hint why you should keep your code clean of circular dependencies. Over the years, however, this style of development can lead ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible