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13

The conflict comes fundamentally from these two rules: sentence: sentence '[' Text ']' | sentence '[' sentenceList ']' The reason is that after seeing a sentence and a [ and looking at the next token being Text, the parser doesn't known whether to shift the Text, matching the first rule, or to treat that Text as the beginning of a sentenceList ...


12

I'm not too familiar with Jison's inner workings, so I don't know any method that would do it. But in case you're interested in a little bruteforce to solve this problem, try this: First, create an object to hold the AST function jisonAST(name, x) { this.name = name; this.x = x; } // return the indented AST jisonAST.prototype.get = function(indent){ // ...


8

What am I supposed to make of this debug message? A grammar conflict means the parser can reach a state where it could follow multiple rules, but it doesn't have enough information to determine which one to follow (or worse, the grammar is ambiguous). You'll have to tweak the grammar to eliminate the conflicts. Often, this just takes practice to get ...


7

I discovered a way which is far easier than the one arlimus described. This post is divided into 2 parts: General way: Read how to implement my way. Actual answer: An implementation of the previously described way specific to OP's request. General way Add a return statement to your start rule. Example: start : xyz EOF {return $1;} ; ...


6

I created a language using Jison which uses python-style indentation. It's an automated white-box algorithm testing language called Bianca. Bianca only has two dependencies - one is Jison and the other one is Lexer. Jison supports custom scanners and Lexer is one such scanner. In C-style programming languages blocks of code are delimited by curly braces. ...


6

Unfortunately no one provided an answer to my question :) I had to reverse engineering Jison Lexer code to find out the right syntax. As I suppose it may help others, here after the answer :) Jison's lexical conditions work fine under JSON syntax, but they should be predeclared in an array named "startConditions" as in following example. grammar = { ...


5

I'm not entirely familiar with Jison, but it looks like you're defining a rule that looks like this: expression ::= number; expression ::= expression binary expression; Consider the expression 1 - 2 - 3. That could be interpreted as (1 - 2) - 3 or 1 - (2 - 3). Which is it? Your grammar is ambiguous. Normal mathematical rules say it should be ...


4

The only thing you get automatically are syntax errors. In other words, if you don't provide actions, the bison-generated code will verify that the input corresponds to the grammar, and nothing else.


4

I was able to inject the line number into my AST nodes by monkey-patching the generated parser in my compiler. This was suggested by Zach. facepalms // load in your generated parser var parser = require('./parser'); // store the current performAction function parser._performAction = parser.performAction; // override performAction parser.performAction = ...


4

The classic scanner/parser model (originally from lex/yacc, and implemented by jison as well) puts the scanner before the parser. In other words, the scanner is expected to tokenize the input stream without regard to parsing context. Most lexical scanner generators, including jison, provide a mechanism for the scanner to adapt to context (see "start ...


4

Is my idea to just concentrate on parsing function and ignoring everything else (i.e. dumping them back) inherently flawed? It's not inherently flawed. In fact, it is a common approach [Note 1]. However, your solution requires more work. First, you need to make your lexer more robust. It should correctly identify comments and string literals. ...


3

You should use $n (where n is a number) to get the nth token in an expression: e : '{{' e '}}' {$$ = $2;} | STR ; The only required change from your original code is to use the action $$ = $2; for '{{' e '}}'. I've not put any action for STR because the default action is $$ = $1, which is what you want there.


3

The problem is in your second production for program: program : expression { $$ = $1; } | program expression { $$ = $1; } What the second production is saying, basically, is "a program can be a (shorter) program followed by an expression, but its semantic value is the value of the shorter program." You evidently want the ...


3

The %lex and /lex markers only delimit the section of the grammar that pertain to the scanner generator. The %lex marker marks the start and /lex marks the end. When using bison and flex you'd put the lexer's definitions (the "scanner generator" in Jison parlance) in a .l file and the grammar in a .y file. I do not think there exist a way using bison and ...


3

Good question. jison's lexer generator has two modes: the default mode, and a slightly more flex-compatible mode. You select the latter by placing %options flex after the %lex line. In default mode: The first matching pattern wins, even if a later pattern would match a longer token; and Patterns which end with a letter or digit have an implicit \b added ...


3

The problem is your grammar is ambiguous -- a nodes consists of a sequence of one or mode node with no separators. A node is a text which consists of one or more text_element again with no separators. So there's no way to tell when one node ends and the next on begins. As an example, if you have a sequence of 3 text_elements in you input, it might be a ...


3

The problem here is that the Jison parser expects a single expression to parse, and it tries to evaluate whether the ENTIRE text is valid as a whole. What you've given it in this case is TWO separate expressions that don't evaluate correctly together, which is why it fails. If, for example, you evaluate 5*PI^2 + 23+56 Then it has no problems. This is ...


3

The main problem in your code is the premature use of return. Using return will end the parsing right there. So if you use it in a rule that is not meant to terminate parsing, you're in trouble. I like to have one rule which is the entry point of the whole system and whose job is only to call return with something sensible. Here's something that works more ...


3

To call a function defined under your productions (such as fact), you can use the mod-brace notation %{ and %} for multiline semantic actions: e : e '+' e ... | e '!' %{ // the %{ tells jison this is a multi-line js eval statement $$ = fact($1); %} ; As a final solution, try this: /* lexical ...


2

The precedence is the result of the operands of ADD and SUB being factors, and only factors contain MUL and DIV operators. ADD does not compete with MUL, because the MUL is encapsulated in a term. Thinking about this from the point of view of the parser: the term expression must be reduced before the parser considers its relation to the ADD operator, and ...


2

The reason this has an "implicit" precedence (rather than explicit) is indeed just as the text says, due to the factored grammar (separate nonterminals). Work through your example of 1 + 3 * 2, imagining yourself as the computer doing the parsing, following each instruction "to the letter" as it were. In order to find an "exp" (expression) you must first ...


2

The reason for this is because %prec will only set the precedence of the rule, not on all the individual tokens. So, the individual precedence of the tokens on the RHS of the rule still matters. So, setting %prec on your multiplication rule will not alter the precedence of the '*' symbol. When precedence tries to resolve conflicts it will compare the reduce ...


2

I'll assume that tags all match the pattern for variables, whatever pattern that might be. (\a\w*, maybe). Define a dictionary whose keys are tags; the value can be whatever you want to associate with the tag. As I understand it, you can make this dictionary available to both the parser and the lexer by putting it inside the object parser.yy. The lexer rule ...


2

Because that's a Jison grammar tokenization rule not an exact regex. In Jison a token is surrounded in ". In the compiled rules you can see the rule converted to a regex: ["[0-9]+(?:\\.[0-9]+)?\\b", "return 'NUMBER';"],


2

I think there are more than one problem with your code. The first (and this explains the 1 output) is that [].push returns the new length of the list, so what you want is probably push, and then define the value: template : template TOPTEXT { $template.push($TOPTEXT); $$ = $template; } | template dynamic { $template.push($dynamic); $$ = $template; ...


2

In this line, instead of returning the sum of the operands in $$, : e '+' e {$$ = $1+$3;} would it work to return the desired object? : e '+' e {$$ = ["+", $1, $3];}


2

The string {} could be parsed either as a block, or as an objectExpression. You have a few choices. In Javascript parsers, if there is an ambiguity between block and objectExpression, it will choose the one that comes first in the parent rule. In the following expression, the empty block will be preferred over the empty object. expression: : block ...


2

The recursion isn't interpreted or rejected. You have to split it into 2 elements to make it work: Array : '[' Element ']' {{ $$ = ['ArrayList', $2]; }} ; Element : Element "," Expr {{ $$ = $1 + ',' + $3 }} | Expr {{ $$ = $1 }}; This returns an Array as expected: ["ArrayList","1,2,3,4"]


2

The lexer object is available in a parser action as yy.lexer, so you can change the start condition with yy.lexer.begin('expression'); and go back to the old one with yy.lexer.popState(). That part is not problematic. However, you need to think about when the new start condition will take effect. An LALR(1) parser, such as the one implemented by jison (or ...


2

Most of the work parsing troff is lexical, although you could make use of a parser to evaluate arithmetic expressions. The "grammar" is otherwise just a question of identifying control lines and splitting them into arguments (again, essentially lexical). If you intend to implement the controls which modify control and escape characters (.cc, .c2, .ec and ...



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