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1

Th 8k limit probably just an outdated heuristic. Back in the days [TM], JITing was somewhat costly (especially when viewed from a responsiveness point-of-view). In fact, most interesting optimizations (think constant-folding, good register-allocation etc.) are super-linear. Hence you want to be extra careful not to stop the whole process for half a second to ...


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Just one additional Note. I can only observe this strange behavior if I use long for r and is. If I convert them to int then I get these timings: Static: 352 ms Dynamic: 353 ms Static: 348 ms Dynamic: 349 ms Static: 349 ms Dynamic: 348 ms Static: 349 ms Dynamic: 344 ms So one possible conclusion is to avoid long in those situations. At least with ...


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It looks like is the way Java is adding values to variable r. I've made a few changes, adding method run2(): public class TestPerformanceOfStaticVsDynamicCalls { private static final long RUNS = 1_000_000_000L; public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("Test run 1 ================================="); new ...


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Preamble: Writing microbenchmarks manually is almost always doomed to a failure. There are frameworks that have already solved the common benchmarking problems. JIT compilation unit is a method. Incorporating several benchmarks into a single method leads to unpredictable results. JIT heavily relies on the execution profile, i.e. the run-time statistics. If ...


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Update: as of 7/2014, LLVM has added a feature called "Patch Points", which are used to support Polymorphic Inline Caches in Safari's FTL JavaScript JIT. This covers exactly the use case complained about int Armin Rigo's comment in the original question.


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The compiler defaults to unchecked arithmetic; you have simply overflown and looped around, thanks to two's-complement storage. This fails at runtime: public static void Main() { int i = 2147483647; int j = checked((int)(i + 1)); // <==== note "checked" Console.WriteLine(j); Console.ReadKey(); } This can also be enabled globally as a ...


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As Christos says, the negative sign comes from integer overflow. The reason you do net get an error is because the compiler does not evaluate expressions for overflowing values. 0111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 2^31-1 +0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001 1 =1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 -2^31 The reason for this is that the leftmost ...


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Why I don't have a compilation or runtime error? Because compiler can determine that you have assigned a larger than int.MaxValue value to the variable. Since it is hard coded. But for i+1 compiler can't execute the code to determine that the result of this calculation would be greater than int.MaxValue What is the reason of the negative sign? It ...


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What is the reason of the negative sign? You have a negative sign, because you have exceeded the maximum integer value and the next integer is the lowest integer that can be represented. Why I don't have a compilation or runtime error? You don't have a complilation error, because this is not an error. Also, this is not a runtime error. You just ...


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Most of Linq extension methods from Linq for Collections are not working with IEnumerables on iOS since they require AOT runtime compiler which is not supported. However there is a Linq for iOS library on Asset Store that is similar to Linq but doesn't require a runtime compiler. So you can use it on iOS.


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20% of the byte code is used 80% of the time. The JIT compiler gets these stats and optimizes this 20% of the byte code to run faster by adding inline methods, removal of unused locks etc and also creating the bytecode specific to that machine. I am quoting from this article, I found it was handy. ...


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mono_mkbundle_init() is a function generated by mkbundle in host.c "initializing the JIT" should be mono function mono_jit_init() so the meaning is that, link the generated c file in your native application and invoke mono_mkbundle_init() before invoking mono_jit_init()


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You can also use hsdis plugin based on FCML library. It can be compiled for UNIX-like systems as well as for the Windows, but in case of Windows system instead of building your own binaries (as far as I know you are obligated to do so in case of binutils based projects due to license incompatibilities), you can use pre-built libraries available in the ...


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In Java 7 and 8, surely you should just use Integer.compare. Then you can totally avoid any boxing whatsoever. Simple!



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