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39

I'm a manager with the jMonkeyEngine project. I apologize for the late response, but StackOverflow posts got such an excellent search ranking that people are still coming to our site via pages like this one, so I figured I'd best bring this topic up to speed. In short, yes you can use jMonkeyEngine 3 on Android. Not the older 1.0 and 2.0 versions. However ...


13

Glad that you interesting in JME3. I’m also working for a project that target making education programs (youngs and adults) in gaming enviroment. If you going to let your children learn programming via game developing, it’s a good idea. But both JME3 and Unity are far more complicated to start with ( I assume your children are still young )… There are also ...


12

http://jmonkeyengine.org/wiki/doku.php/jme3 has a complete series of tutorials for jME3. They just haven't been accessible via google until now.. http://jmonkeyengine.org/wiki/doku.php/jme2:jme2 has a series of tutorials for the now community-supported old jME2


9

Updated: jMonkeyEngine 3 Beginner's Guide jMonkeyEngine 3 Cookbook I am in the jMonkey Core Team, albeit not as a programmer. For starters, if you're considering JOGL, I hope you're looking at JOGL2 by JogAmp, and not the old abandoned one over at Java.net. In terms of use, JOGL and jME are two different things. JOGL, like LWJGL that jME (and ...


6

You can create a primitive plane, using a Quad shape. http://www.jmonkeyengine.com/doc/com/jme/scene/shape/Quad.html This is always perfectly flat. You can use other techniques for texturing. Also note: the Z-height of this Quad is always 0. (It's really flat!)


6

Update In the most recent version of Jmonkey a Line class exists which makes this process far simpler. This is detailed here. Original answer Lines in JMonkey are created with custom meshes to which you give the vertices as a position buffer of floats and the indices (which vertices connect to which) as a buffer of shorts. This answer is loosly based upon ...


5

I have found the answer, here. The solution to the problem is this : Create a CollisionShape. Create a PhysicsControl by supplying the CollisionShape and mass. E.g. com.jme3.bullet.control.RigidBodyControl Add the PhysicsControl to the Spatial. Add the PhysicsControl to the physicsSpace object. Attach the Spatial to the rootNode, as usual. ...


5

Have a look at this: material.getAdditionalRenderState().setFaceCullMode(FaceCullMode.Off); This should show the texture on both sides. If you need the material only on the inside of your mesh, use FaceCullMode.Front, although in that case you should probably redefine your mesh instead so that its normals are pointing inwards.


4

Although XNA doesn't have built in primitives you can use. The XNA shader series is an example which has a bunch of primitives you could reuse from it.


4

If you want to make it a little more robust, you could make it invariant to the position of the corners: if (a.x <= p.x && p.x <= b.x || b.x <= p.x && p.x <= a.x) { // similar to the y- and z-axes. } A more intutive (but slightliy slower) variant would be to use min/max on each axis: if (Math.min(a.x, b.x) <= p.x ...


4

According to their blog Android support is coming with the upcoming jMonkeyEngine3, so it looks like you will have to wait for their next official release.


4

jME 3 can be used on Android, and the Android support is a relatively new feature as of 2011, but a previous version of jME cannot be used. Mostly this was due to architectural issues with an inflexible pipeline under the hood that wouldn't easily be able to support the mobile GL API. Edited post because information was no longer accurate and was receving ...


4

Reading through the tutorial you provided, it seems you might have a typo. You have: cameraNode.setControlDir(ControlDirection.CameraToSpatial); However, the tutorial has: //This mode means that camera copies the movements of the target: camNode.setControlDir(ControlDirection.SpatialToCamera); Lower down in the tutorial it defines the difference ...


4

Ok, found out the problem. The converter was still not finding the texture, even though it had stopped reporting the error about it. I had to rename the texture to match the model's filename exactly (except for the extension, of course), so "dwarf.jpg" became "dwarf1.jpg". Note also that it has to be in the same exact folder: in my case, I put it in the ...


4

I'd suggest jMonkeyEngine for this. It uses LWJGL under the hood but provides some higher level constructs that will make your life much easier - in particular it implements a scene graph that you can use to build your world / models. LWJGL could also be a good choice, but it's more low-level (effectively a thin wrapper over OpenGL). So you would need to ...


4

So sorry.... You can batch all Geometries in a scene (or a subnode) that remains static. Batching means that all Geometries with the same Material are combined into one mesh. This optimization only has an effect if you use only few (roughly up to 32) Materials total. The pay-off is that batching takes extra time when the game is initialized The change in ...


4

Found a convenient solution on the jmonkeyengine documentation: Monkey canvas + Swing GUI here is the code quote: final JMenuItem itemSwitchTab = new JMenuItem("Switch to tab #2"); menuTortureMethods.add(itemSwitchTab); itemSwitchTab.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){ public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){ if ...


4

To do this you change the value of the max slope: setMaxSlope() From the jmonkey site: "How steep the slopes and steps are that the character can climb without considering them an obstacle. Higher obstacles need to be jumped. Vertical height in world units." Reading this I believe it works in a way similar to, when moving 1 unit in the world what ...


4

The variable control is null, and you attempt to call method output() on it. You'll probably want to check it for null in an if statement before attempting to call methods on it. If you're not expecting it to ever be null, try looking at why the previous line is returning null. final ConsoleControl control = ...


4

I wasn't able to get Java 8 to work within the JMonkey IDE. However I was able to do it the other way round; add JMonkey libraries to Netbeans 8. Install Netbeans 8 Then you follow the instructions for adding JMonkey as a library to annother IDE. The instructions are for eclipse (as JMonkey IDE is based on Netbeans it would normally make no sense to do ...


3

I don't think you will find something like that. Floodfill is somewhat bound to pixel based graphics, and that doesn't go along well with OpenGl / 3d. If you have some kind of pixel concept for 3d, I think adapting a 2d algorithm shouldn't be rocket science. I just doubt anyone found it useful so far. Perhaps something like octrees is worth further ...


3

I'd recommend reading about Euler Angles, yaw/pitch/roll, and quaternion orientation. These topics will help you understand everything involved. If I understand correctly, you're trying to construct Euler angles from a specified orientation. See this code for some algorithms for working with Euler angles. In particular, I believe what you want is the ...


3

Actually, the best I found is this one: http://www.theprogrammersweblog.com/2008/12/3d-game-programming-in-java-using.html It's incomplete (but maybe it will be completed someday), but 11 parts are already available. The aim is to create a complete Asteroid game.


3

You could look into Unity3D


3

Java3D isn't really designed for huge point clouds. It's designed for managed scene graphs, whereas for big point clouds you typically want to do some pretty direct OpenGL calls. You are better off going with jMonkeyEngine (which has it's own point cloud/particle effect subsystem) or LWJGL (which is what jMonkeyEngine uses under the hood and will give you ...


3

Looks like your normals are pointing in opposite directions. Either check your rendering engine to see if you have reverse normals function, or you need to provide the vertices in reverse order. Or try this method Box wall = new Box(new Vector3f(i, 0.0f, 0.0f), 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f);


3

In your example you have about 100+ bricks - just imagine how many of them you'll need for full dungeon and how it will kill your physics performance :). It's almost impossible do create playable game with this approach. You should create some static mesh and divide it into corridors, rooms, etc. so you could draw only visible part of your level. If you ...


3

The law of gravitation says F = G (m1 * m2) / r^2 where m1 and m2 are the masses of the two bodies, and r is the distance. G is the gravitational constant. Newton's second law says F = m * a, so if we put them together, the body with mass m1 would experience an acceleration of a = G * m2 / r^2 from gravitational pull from the body with mass m2. Now, what ...


3

You're probably using an old Nifty version. Your first panel with the id="panel" uses childLayout="center" and it has two child elements (an image and another panel). This was not supported in Nifty versions prior to 1.3.1. Here is a quote from the Nifty Manual PDF: Another thing that has been improved in Nifty 1.3.1 is that childLayout=“center“ now ...


3

You can use look at method to rotate your spatial to a target point. Below sample makes a spatial look at camera with up vector 1,0,0 spatial_x.lookAt(cam.getLocation(),new Vector3f(1,0,0)); If you just want to rotate about x axis for 0.2 radians: spatial_x.rotate(0.2,0,0); Y axis for 1 radian and Z axis for 3 radians: spatial_x.rotate(0,1,3);



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