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0

You could use an aggregator with appropriate correlation and release strategies (and a group timeout).


1

It depends on what property(or properties) ActiveMQ indexes messages. I would expect messages to be indexed on message identifier and correlation identifier because these are the two properties on which messages are searched frequently. Indexing messages on application specific properties is highly unlikely. So JMSCorrelationID would be your best choice.


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As an example for SOAP format, w3c requires using JMS property named "SOAPJMS_contentType" (http://www.w3.org/TR/soapjms/). It looks that there is nothing about JSON format in the standards, but you can use name like that. Such name will be processed correctly by IBM JMS libraries.


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I think, in the producer, you are starting the connection before setting the destination. Try it starting afterwards.... // Create a ConnectionFactory ActiveMQConnectionFactory connectionFactory = new ActiveMQConnectionFactory("tcp://localhost:61616"); // Create a Connection connection = ...


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You say "another program". If it's really another program then they are different myChannels. I think what you want to do is send a message to JMS so the first program's myChannel will get the message from JMS. You need to use an outbound channel adapter in the second program to send the message to the JMS queue.


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The property name "Content-Type" has a '-' character. According to JMS specifications a property name can contain any character for which the Java Character.isJavaIdentifierPart method returns a true. For '-' character isJavaIdentifierPart method returns false. Hence the setStringProperty("Content-Type", "application/json") method call fails with the ...


2

I would have expected the consumer not to consume/print anything becauses the messages he is interested at are blocked by the messages 0,1,2 that are not being pulled by any consumer This assumption is incorrect. When you use a selector in JMS, the messages that do not satisfy the selector expression will not be delivered to the QueueReceiver. The ...


0

It looks like you are trying to just connect and send any old thing over to ActiveMQ, at least in the examples you've given. This of course will never work as you need to communicate using the correct protocol (currently STOMP and MQTT are supported). There are several implementations out there for client side communication inside Node for STOMP based ...


2

cf.setStringProperty(WMQConstants.WMQ_CHANNEL, "SYSTEM.DEF.SVRCONN"); You should not be using a SYSTEM channel. Ask your MQAdmin to create one for your application. connection = cf.createConnection(); Change it to: connection = cf.createConnection("myUser","myPswd"); Ask your MQAdmin if the authentication is targeted to either Local OS or LDAP and ...


2

MQ maintains a Topic Tree for managing publish/subscribe. By default access for non-admin users to the topic tree is not allowed. The root of the topic tree resolves attributes from SYSTEM.BASE.TOPIC. When an application attempts to create a publisher with a topic, MQ makes authority checks using the topic string specified. MQ searches the topic tree for a ...


1

qpid does not have a websphere-MQ like monitor trigger feature. I know ActiveMQ doesn't either, and I suspect this may be true of other JMS providers as well. However, it is possible to roll out your own monitor-trigger. A homebrew monitor-trigger would then become an application process(albeit light-lightweight) that you will have to manage though, would ...


0

After a few hours trying to solve this, I think I found a way to stop an asynchronous message consumer (MessageListener). The solution involves using Java locks (synchronized statements, and wait/notify methods). First, on your main thread you need to lock the message listener after starting your JMS connection and invoke the message listener “wait” method. ...


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Are you looking for way to stop and and start delivery of messages? If so, then JMS defines connection.Stop method to pause delivery of messages. Message delivery can be resumed with connection.Start method. So HornetQ JMS client would have these methods implemented. You will need to use these methods.


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You need user id and password (depending on version of MQ) to connect to queue manager. This user id would typically exist on the machine where the queue manager is running. You will need to pass the user id and password as below in your code. Replace with your user and password. cf.setStringProperty(WMQConstants.USERID,"userid"); ...


0

It's really not your consumer code that's the problem, but that something's wrong when sending the message to the output channel. Focus there and see why messages take so long to write to ActiveMQ. First I'd try making it non-persistent (but still durable) and see if that behaves differently. It could be that the ActiveMQ server is configured incorrectly ...


0

I suggest you turn on debug logging for org.springframework follow the message through the flow, as well as logs from the JmsTemplate used within the adapter.


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You should use a JMS bridge : https://docs.jboss.org/author/display/WFLY8/Messaging+configuration#Messagingconfiguration-JMSBridge


3

You can use the ActiveMQ broker Camel component to interceptor messages within the broker and route them using Camel routes http://activemq.apache.org/broker-camel-component.html


0

It seems to me that you had a simple case issue about the connection factory name. It should be an upper case Q like this: connectionFactoryName = QueueConnectionFactory instead of "queueConnectionFactory".


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reading your description, I presume you are trying to queue the incoming messages. Have a new inner class, that implements MessageListener. Write a method that accepts some parameter and does some validation. In the onMessage method, you can invoke the method passing appropriate parameter and if condition satisfies, queue the message, In the parent ...


0

page.db is used to store persistent messages that comes into a queue, they will be removed once they are consumed by a consumer. if you want to limit the maximum size of the page.db its not possible, however a workaround would be to analyse your traffic (see how much space a message takes [page.db size / no of messages in all queues at a time]) and then ...


0

Swap is used to store non-persistent messages when the queue cache is full. if you go to sys$queuemanager swiftlet's queues properties you can see how many messages are configured to store in cache. (default is 500) if the producer produces over 500 non-persistent messages and the consumer has not consumed, the messages will be written to the .swp file, if ...


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Today I ran into a Flex Session Problem as well and encountered this SO question. Well, the question is quite old, so I guess the original poster probably does not require any help any more, but for whoever stumbles across this post, I maybe the following info could help you. A Flex App requires a valid session ID from the web app container (here tomcat), ...


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jms:selector expression="putOnQueueTime > ABC " can use the above expression in jms inbound.


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The timeout comes from the vm endpoint, see (vm extends seda) http://camel.apache.org/seda You can set a higher timeout there, or configure it to not wait for task to complete.


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I think here is your answer given :- Using an expression in a JMS Selector in Mule 3 And one more thing, you cannot use #[flowVars.reqId] for getting the jms:selector value dynamically since flow variable scope is limited to a flow ... instead use a session variable like #[sessionVars.reqId].. and your flow will be modified as follow :- <flow ...


0

I found a solution: This is all tutorial, step to step. http://www.mastertheboss.com/jboss-server/jboss-jms/how-to-code-a-remote-jms-client-for-wildfly-8 And very importand: to pom.xml must add: <properties> <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding> ...


1

Adding factoryName="org.apache.activemq.jndi.ActiveMQInitialContextFactory" to the JMS element solved the problem. The final JMS element in the log4j2.xml looks like this: <JMS name="jmsQueue" destinationBindingName="logQueue" factoryName="org.apache.activemq.jndi.ActiveMQInitialContextFactory" factoryBindingName="ConnectionFactory" ...


0

Above answer is correct but will not work until you don't add schedulePeriodForDestinationPurge="10000" at broker level. Every 10 seconds broker checks for inactive queues where no active consumer is connected and number of pending messages are zero. you can set it at higher value as well.


0

I've found a solution. The issue is related to the white spaces in the path; indeed, Files\Apache in the exception message refers to a part of the path c:\Program Files\Apache Software Foundation\apache-activemq-5.9.0>bin\activemq. I've quickly solved it moving the ActiveMQ folder to a "whitespace-free" path and now it works.


1

When you create the domain using WLST, what do you set the JNDI name of the connection factory to? Typically you will see something like this in your domain setup script (.py): cf = create('ConnectionFactoryName', "ConnectionFactory") cf.setName('ConnectionFactoryName') cf.setJNDIName('ConnectionFactoryJNDIName') In this case you would simply use ...


0

The solution is actually using the server IP address instead of localhost in the configuration.


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In spring-boot I'm configuring JMS like this @Configuration @EnableJms public class JmsConfiguration implements JmsListenerConfigurer { ... // register here your jms listners @Override public void configureJmsListeners{ ... } } An then do whatever you want when you receive a message @Override @JmsListener(destination = ...


0

Message segmentation is a Messaging Provider specific feature and is not defined in JMS specification. Hence you have to use provider specific APIs, MQ base Java classes for example, to get segmented messages.


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JMS is a client side API, not a protocol. Using the ActiveMQ JMS client, you will use OpenWire, which cannot be sent over websocket (without a major coding exercise). What you can do is to proxy one of the transports that actually work well with websockets - MQTT or STOMP. I would recommend using some lightweight reverse proxy in front of both your web app ...


0

Compare the 3 different JREs (Windows, Solaris & mainframe) that you are using - maybe the Windows JRE, by default, is using a newer compress method. Hence, you may need to force it to use a compression method that is supported by the mainframe JRE. Also, are you using an Oracle or IBM JRE on Windows? I would strongly suggest that you use an IBM JRE ...


3

Why not use a Queue instead of a Topic? Then your instances will compete for messages rather than all get a copy. EDIT rabbitmq might be a better fit for you - publish to a fanout exchange and have any number of queues bound to it, with each queue having any number of competing consumers. I have also seen JMS topics used where competing clients connect ...


0

One common issue that Java EE 6 developers meet is the use of the @Resource annotation which conflicts with the JDK built-in @javax.annotation.Resource. Here we will show how to solve the compilation issue in Eclipse and Maven. If you have a look at the @Resource annotation included in Java EE 6, it includes the lookup attribute. Unfortunately, as we ...


0

amqsput QueueName QueueManagerName Press Enter. Enter your message followed by Enter/Return key.


1

That would be a Message-driven Bean-like in the plain Java EE world. Have a look here. By the way, the attribute is destination="queue.name"; there is no such a thing like <jms:listener-destination="order.queue"... destination: The destination name for this listener (in other words: the queue where the listener will "listen" to; named as destination in ...


0

Did you even try? Yes, it works pretty much as you expect it to. MQTT msgs gets converted to JMS if you try read it with JMS (OpenWire). From web site: Message transformations MQTT messages are transformed into an JMS ByteMessage. Conversely, the body of any JMS Message is converted to a byte buffer to be the payload of an MQTT message.


2

Concurrent consumers on a queue compete for messages in the queue. Exactly one consumer receives each message. Concurrent consumers in a container are usually used to improve performance, as long as message order is not important. Competing Consumers is when more than one consumer competes for messages in a queue. This could be multiple containers or ...


3

No, you are no supposed to set the JMSRedelivered property while publishing a message. This property will be set by the messaging provider when it delivers a message more than once. According to JMS specification If a client receives a message with the JMSRedelivered indicator set, it is likely, but not guaranteed, that this message was delivered but not ...


0

There are two types of redelivery. The typical one is the redelivery policy you bind to the ConnectionFactory client side. The broker is not aware of the redelivery in this setup since it's handled by the client, and the message is actually on the client waiting for redelivery. However, since the message is not committed (or Acknowledged) by the client, the ...


0

CORBA, which is not hot nowdays, allows objects to be used remotely by different systems. It is more similar to RMI. JMS is the Java API that allows building applications that send and receive messages. IBM MQ or ActiveMQ are samples of JMS vendors that implements this API.


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Are you using asynchronous consumer i.e. do you have onMessage method to receive messages? The reason for calling connection.start after consumers have been created is that connection.start call tells the messaging provider to start message delivery. Your application must be ready to receive messages. If you are using a message listener (onMessage method), ...


0

In that case you could choose synchronous receive call i.e. consumer.receive(timeout) instead of message listener. You can make the receive call only when you want. I am also wondering a bit as the onMessage method should be invoked by SQS messaging provider only when there is a message in the queue. There should be no polling involved here. Update: SQS ...


0

Well I found out that the previously stored messages are showing up every time I run the ProducerDemo class. This code is fine.


0

As I've written in a comment, Nicholas was right. The transaction attribute had to be set to TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRES_NEW. This way the messaging bean can send the JMS message instantly, without waiting for the processing bean.


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Why don't you fork off the long running process to a separate object ? > If there's a way to control the pool size of these separate objects, it could be a way. Do you want to try an answer? :-) You do not want an uncontrolled object growth over time ? Hmmm...I can see where you are going with that. The only thing I can think of is use a FixedThreadPool ...



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