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5

If you want to avoid problems and learn Java Swing correctly, go check out their tutorials here. There are too many problems to discuss here, so I'll try to keep it simple. You're using a null layout. null layouts are avoided for the most part because there is usually a layout that does exactly what you want. It takes some time to get it working, but ...


5

Don't use a null layout Don't create components in a painting method. The paint() method is for custom painting only. There is no need for you to override the paint() method. Read the section from the Swing tutorial How to Use FlowLayout for a simple example that uses buttons and a layout manager.


5

The default layout manager for the content pane of a JFrame is a BorderLayout. By default when you add a component to the frame is will be added to the CENTER of the BorderLayout. The problem is only one component can be added so only the last one added is displayed. You can try something like: add(p1, BorderLayout.NORTH); Or you can create a JPanel add ...


5

Issue one: The Square sometimes bounces off an edge. Other times it sinks, and I can't figure out why. You'll hate yourself for this, but } else if (yPosit > height - SQUARE_SIZE) { xPosit = height - SQUARE_SIZE; xSpeed = -SPEED_OF_SQUARE; } Should be... } else if (yPosit > height - SQUARE_SIZE) { yPosit = height - SQUARE_SIZE; ...


4

1- Ensure that your code runs in EDT 2- @Flight2039 is correct, it seems that BorderLayout where location is not the CENTER uses preferredSize to determinate the size. So you could override getPreferredSize() 3- When you override paintComponent(..) you have to call super.paintComponent(..) to follow painting method chaining. More information here. 4- ...


4

The text is hidden by the menu bar because last parameter of drawString() is the text baseline, and not the upper bound: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/awt/Graphics2D.html#drawString(java.lang.String,%20int,%20int) So you need to use something like: g.drawString("TEST", 1, 50); Or better, use Font.getStringBounds() to compute your text ...


4

You have a few problems you need to deal with You've created two sets of variable. One set in your frame, and one set in your panel. With your Keyalistener, you are only changing the values of the ones in the frame, which will have no affect on the ones in the panel. Updates to the UI should be done on the Event Dispatch Thread. Don't use a new thread with ...


3

Instead of trying to remove and add entire panels, a better, less problem prone approach would be to use a CardLayout that will allow to swap views. You can see more at How to use Cardlayout Also, by the looks of your method signature, it seems you're using the Netbeans builder too. You may also want to take a look at How to Use CardLayout with Netbeans Gui ...


3

You don't have to declare a listener class for each button, you can just use the same one and add if statement to determine from which button the action come from. if (e.getSource() == blueButton) {// e is the ActionEvent blueButton.getParent().setBackground(Color.BLUE); } else if(e.getSource() == redButton) { ...


3

The line JLabel fiveByFiveLabels[][] = new JLabel[5][5]; creates an emtpy array that can hold 5x5 labels. But there are no labels inside. All array entries are null. Insert this line for(int i = 0, k = 0; i <= 4; i++, k = k + 80) { for(int j = 0, l = 0; j <= 4; j++, l = l + 80) { fiveByFiveLabels[i][j] = new JLabel(); // <--- This ...


3

You state: I'm having trouble figuring out how to move and image to a different place in the window. You will want to tell us the details of your problem. Where is your image now? What do you want your GUI to look like? Details matter. I read about BorderLayout but I'm not sure how to implement it. What confuses you about the tutorial? I ...


3

You need to override getPreferredSize() for your custom JPanels so that layout managers know how big to make them. The center position will size your panels to use all the available space, but the other positions will not. See this example which also removes your setSize() and setLocation() as well and replaces it with a call to pack(). import ...


3

class Game extends JFrame { /* Type your variable declarations here */ // Score of game int score = 0; // Get board size int width = this.gameboard.getWidth(); int height = this.gameboard.getHeight(); /** The panel where all of the game's images are rendered */ GameBoard gameboard = null; Based on this you will have a ...


2

myFrame.add(control_buttons); myFrame.add(lights); By default a JFrame uses a BorderLayout. Also, by default components get added to the CENTER of the BorderLayout. However the CENTER can only contain a single component so only the last component added is displayed. Try: myFrame.add(control_buttons, BorderLayout.NORTH); Now the two components should ...


2

Start by adding you buttons to another JPanel... JPanel buttons = new JPanel(); buttons.setLayout(...); // add buttons... Set the Border of this panel... buttons.setBorder(BorderFactory.createLineBorder(Color.black)); Add this to you main container... welcomePanel.add(buttons); Pixel perfect layouts are an illusion in modern UI design, you don't ...


2

Use a CardLayout to change views, instead of trying to remove and add panels. What you're trying to do can easily be accomplished by calling the next() and previous() methods of the CardLayout. All you really need to do is set the layout of your panelCombination to CardLayout, add all you panels to the panelCombination and use those methods CardLayout ...


2

You would need an additional JPanel with a border layout. To that container you would add the icon to the North and the scroll pane to the center like this. JPanel contents = new JPanel(new BorderLayout()); JLabel carImage = new JLabel(icon); contents.add(carImage, BorderLayout.NORTH); contents.add(scrollPane, BorderLayout.CENTER); ...


2

p1.add(l1,0,0); This is not how to position things in panels. Use a border for white space. import java.awt.*; import javax.swing.*; import javax.swing.border.*; /* <applet code=TwoPanel width=400 height=300></applet> */ public class TwoPanel extends JApplet { JPanel p1,p2; JLabel l1,l2; @Override public void init() { ...


2

The border layout feature is what you want to use IF you want to position the picture in different sections. You can have things like CENTER, NORTH, SOUTH, WEST, EAST, etc. Here's how you would implement it: setLayout(new BorderLayout()); JPanel southPanel = new JPanel(); southPanel.add(PICTUREGOESHERE); add(southPanel, BorderLayout.SOUTH); First, you ...


2

Any solutions? As you have already stated, "I can simply make many buttons". This is probably the easiest solution (without knowing your exact requirment) and there is no reason you can't do this as you can always share an ActionListener between all buttons so you don't have to create multiple listeners. Or for something completely different you can ...


2

Your main problem: You should only call setVisible(true) after adding components to your GUI. You don't do this and so the GUI gets drawn without its components. Also: You should avoid setting the sizes or preferred sizes of anything. Instead let the components and layout managers size themselves. And don't forget to call pack() after adding all ...


2

Looking an image 2.png from resources folder Image image= ImageIO.read(new File("resources/2.png")); OR Try this one if the image is in the same package(folder) where the class is present Image image = ImageIO.read(getClass().getResourceAsStream("2.png")); Here is the project structure -- EDIT- Try in this way EventQueue.invokeLater(new ...


2

You are only adding the rightPanels to the frame, you never add leftPanel The rightPanel is using X_AXIS which is horizontal. You want Y_AXIS When you do add the leftPanel, you're going to want to set your frame's layout to GridLayout(1, 2). See GridLayout setVisible after adding all your components. Follow Java namingConvention. variables begin with lower ...


1

It sounds like you want a parent JPanel with a BorderLayout. That parent JPanel contains two other panels, on the east and west side of it. The west side can contain your progress panel, and the east side contains another JPanel, which has a GridLayout of 1 column and 2 rows, or alternatively, a BorderLayout. From there you can add the other two JPanels to ...


1

In case anyone else has this issue in the future: the code that I used after reading through the javadoc and links peeskillet provided: public class ResultsFrame extends javax.swing.JFrame { public static CardLayout switchPanels; /** * Creates new form ResultsFrame */ public ResultsFrame() { initComponents(); switchPanels = new CardLayout(); ...


1

Try using a GridLayout instead. public void GUI() { DogUI = new JFrame("Dog UI"); DogUI.setSize(800, 600); DogUI.setResizable(false); DogUI.setLayout(new GridLayout(1,2));//1row 2col leftPanel = new JPanel(); leftPanel.setBackground(Color.green); topPanel = new JPanel(); topPanel.setBackground(Color.white); bottomPanel ...


1

"But jButtons doesnt stack according to grid. it seems that all of them adds into one place" Since you never answered my question/comment asking what Board is, I'll make an assumption. (Correct me if I'm wrong) Look at your GridLayout construction new GridLayout(board.getHeight(), board.getWidth(), 0, 0) Assuming Board is some kind of container, ...


1

An enum is used as a sort of pseudo-type. You do need the enumerated class because 1. it's part of your assignment and 2. it makes it just clearer to anyone reading your code (including yourself) what certain values mean. If you have some enum Day and some variable day1, it's easy to see what you're doing when you write if (day1.toString.equals("MONDAY")) ...


1

That's a lot of code. I'm not very clear on what you are asking about ArrayLists. In general this is how you put data in an ArrayList List<String> aList = new ArrayList<String>(); aList.add("Hello World"); If you are not familiar with generics and don't recognize the <String> part, you can just leave it off. The ArrayList a list will ...


1

Don't call your class Image. There is a Java Interface by that name which makes your code confusing. If you want to paint multiple images at different locations then the common solution is to keep track of the Images in an ArrayList and then create a custom component that loops through the ArrayList to paint the images at the specified location. Check out ...



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