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3

When adding a component to a JLayeredPane, you're essentially adding the component to a null layout using container. This means that you must fully specify both the component's size and its position, often solving both with a setBounds(...) call. Call this on panel1 and panel2, for example: panel1.setBounds(10, 10, 100, 100); panel2.setBounds(70, 70, 100, ...


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Components are added to a ContentPane of a JFrame rather than the RootPane. You're seeing null displayed to the console as you probably havent set the name property of the component for (Component c : getContentPane().getComponents()) {


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You could consider taking a look at JXLayer/JLayer, which would allow you to paint an overlay on top the component. import java.awt.AlphaComposite; import java.awt.Dimension; import java.awt.EventQueue; import java.awt.Graphics2D; import java.awt.GridBagLayout; import java.awt.RenderingHints; import java.awt.event.MouseAdapter; import ...


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You may use a GridBagLayout and ComponentListener, For example: (inspired from: https://community.oracle.com/thread/1265752?start=0&tstart=0) public class AspectRatio { public static void main(String[] args) { final JPanel innerPanel = new JPanel(); innerPanel.setBackground(Color.YELLOW); final JPanel container = new ...


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import java.awt.*; import javax.swing.*; import javax.swing.border.EmptyBorder; public class YouAreSoSquare { private static JPanel createPanel() { // GBL is important for the next step.. JPanel gui = new JPanel(new GridBagLayout()); JPanel squareComponent = new JPanel() { private static final long ...


2

I don't know much about TableLayout because I've didn't ever use it. If it is your first experience with Swing, try the common Swing Layouts. For your case, you can simple try body.setLayout(new BoxLayout(body, BoxLayout.Y_AXIS)); // instead of TableLayout When U'll understand how layouts work in Swing, use GridBagLayout, because it is the most ...


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The problem stems from you using size values between 0.00 and 1.00. These are interpreted as relative sizes/percentages, in this case 5%. That's why it's showing 20 rows only (0 to 19 inclusive). Try using "50.0" instead and the problem goes away. Or use TableLayout.PREFERRED.


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I can't tell why you're seeing null, and I'm not sure in what way you're seeing it, a NullPointerException perhaps, but I do know that you appear to be removing the JFrame's contentPane, glassPane and rootPane inadvertently, a dangerous thing to do. Instead just use a CardLayout that should allow you to easily and simply swap your GUI views as this is ...


2

Do all your file loading and data manipulation in a background thread that is created using a SwingWorker. Then before executing the SwingWorker, add a PropertyChangeListener. When the PropertyChangeEvents newValue is SwingWorker.StateValue.DONE, then you know all background work is done and you can display your GUI. Please have a look at the Concurrency in ...


2

I don't see where you're adding anything to a JScrollPane in the code you've posted, but I do see an awful lot of setBounds(...) calls as well as setLayout(null), meaning you're setting an absolute size of a component, and this will prevent components from expanding properly when inside of a JScrollPane. Solution: don't do this. Use the layout managers, ...


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The basic code for adding (or removing) a component to a visible GUI is: panel.add(...); panel.revalidate(); // to invoke the layout manager panel.repaint(); // to repaint components with new size/location


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I'm guessing this is a bad practice but I just want to try giving it a shot. Yes because either: Swing components are created outside the Event Dispatch Thread (EDT). A database call (typically a time consuming task) is being performed in the EDT to create the labels and this thread might be blocked causing your GUI become unresponsive. Instead of ...


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Instead of just adding the JLabels to a panel, you need to store them in class level members. When you click a button, you need to change the text in the existing labels. Near this: public static int STR = 0, aPower = 0, sPower = 0, INT = 0, STA = 0, DEF = 0; Add private JLabel strLabel; Then panel.add(new JLabel("Strength " + STR)); ...


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Two quick things... Call setVisible(true); last, after you have established the basic UI. Use lblBoard[i].setText("" + i); instead of (or as well as) lblBoard[i].setName("" + i);


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Find extreme points (the most left one etc) coordinates MinNegativeX, MinNegativeY, MaxPositiveX, MaxPositiveY (for example, -3000, -2000, 1500, 4000) Define MaxX = Math.Max(Abs(MinNegativeX), Abs(MaxPositiveX)) MaxY = Math.Max(Abs(MinNegativeYX), Abs(MaxPositiveY)) Then calculate coefficients CoeffX = 300 / MaxX CoeffY = 300 / MaxY Coeff = ...


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You are overriding the first one with the second statement scrollPane.getViewport().setView(body); scrollPane.getViewport().setView(body2); You should add both JPanels to some parent component, and set that component as view. Something like this: Container cont = new Container(); cont.add(body); cont.add(body2); scrollPane.getViewport().setView(cont); ...


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Here you go, JFrame is set with BorderLayout and you can call it ribbon on bottom, as user interface shown green/red. public class SampleClass extends JFrame{ JPanel centerPanel; JPanel topPanel; JButton btn; boolean check=true; SampleClass(){ centerPanel = new JPanel(); topPanel = new JPanel(); btn=new ...



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