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4

You're using FlowLayout, which will only give your JTextArea the size that it needs. You can either try fiddling with the min, max, and preferred size of the JTextArea, or you can just use a layout that will give your JTextArea as much room as possible. BorderLayout is one option. The default layout of a JFrame is BorderLayout, so really all you need to do ...


4

The JPanelInformations in the constructor creates a local instance JPanel PanelInformation = new JPanel(); which is not added to main panel. You should either add it to this or get rid of it at all and add all the labels to this directly. The same with JPanelVentes


3

You state: File f = new File(capture.jpg); // ****this compiles without quotes????? f.exists(); //this is returning false image = ImageIO.read(f); It's likely false because your path is wrong. Remember that when using Files, the path is relative to the user.dir path. To check to see what the user directory is, simply print out: ...


3

Presuming the Client is using a MouseListener (or MouseMotionListener): the MouseListener can only fire as fast as a certain interval. For example when the mouse is constantly moved your listener will receive a MouseEvent for every interval rather than every pixel. As a result, moving the mouse fast may result in drawing items that are not adjacent to each ...


3

You might be able to use a FlowLayout: FlowLayout: Set to a negative value in a horizontal gap. Override JRadioButton#contains(int, int) Override JPanel#isOptimizedDrawingEnabled() import java.awt.*; import java.awt.geom.*; import java.io.Serializable; import java.util.*; import java.util.List; import javax.swing.*; public final class ...


2

Use BorderLayout and put your panel in the BorderLayout.SOUTH of it


2

Don't try to manage the sizes yourself: //titleButton.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(getSize().width, titleButton.getPreferredSize().height)); titleButton.setToolTipText(tooltip); setLayout(new BoxLayout(this, BoxLayout.Y_AXIS)); //setPreferredSize(new Dimension(childComponent.getPreferredSize().width, titleButton.getPreferredSize().height)); ...


2

Remove all the setSize/setPreferredSize calls and let the LayoutManager do its thing. To allow the JButtons to fill the width of the panel, you can use a BorderLayout (for instance, add the button to CENTER, and the child container to SOUTH and remove all those setSize values to let the LayoutManager handle it).


2

You should not be overriding paint, you should be overriding paintComponent. If your components have already been added to the panel, they will update themselves: public void paintComponent(Graphics g) { super.paintComponent(g); //...paint the rest of the elements... //undoButton.update(g); BAD! //pause.update(g); BAD! } You ...


2

You first need to create a List containing all the Polygons you want to paint: Shape circle = new Ellipse2D.Double(0, 0, 30, 30); List<Shape> shapes = new ArrayList<Shape>(); shapes.add( circle ); Then in your paintComponent() method you iterate through all the shapes in the List: Graphics2D g2d = (Graphics2D)g.create(); for (Shape shape : ...


2

If you are displaying a single column of data from your ResultSet, then easiest would be to use a JList. You'd create a JList with a DefaultListModel<String>, and then in your while loop above, populate the JList with data by calling .addElement(element) on the model. Something like: Declared in class: private DefaultListModel<String> ...


2

class MouseLis extends MouseAdapter{ public void MouseClicked(MouseEvent mev){ int x = mev.getX(); int y = mev.getY(); Place p = new Place(x,y); mp.add(p); mp.repaint(); mp.validate(); } } Note that mouseClicked != MouseClicked. Lesson: ALWAYS use @Override when overriding methods as this would show ...


2

The main problem with the triangles is that the two components need to overlap each other, while the standard Java layouts are designed to prevent overlaps. You have 3 options: You will either need to "fake" the overlap by having one component draw the triangle for the component to the left. Or you can create a component to go inbetween two rectangular ...


1

Here is an example that continually updates a JLabel with an image: import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import java.awt.image.*; import java.io.*; import java.util.*; import javax.imageio.*; import javax.swing.*; import java.net.*; public class ImageReload extends JPanel implements ActionListener { JLabel timeLabel; JLabel imageLabel; ...


1

Inside JPanelInformations class you are creating new JPanel class PanelInformation and adding other elements in it. You should just call add() as JPanelInformations already extends JPanel and you are creating instance of JPanelVentes class. So follow same JPanel logic you have used in JPanelProduit class. Same goes for JPanelVentes as well. Also take ...


1

A panel with no content has a default size of 0x0, so the only way you might see such a panel is if the layout stretches it in both height and width. It is best to override the getPreferredSize() method of a custom painted panel to return a sensible size, then pack() the top level container.


1

You need to "import" classes in each file in order to use them. You have imported JPanel but not JComponent. Under your import JPanel line add another one that looks the same but has JComponent at the end instead of JPanel.


1

I believe you could use BorderFactory panel.setBorder(BorderFactory.createStrokeBorder(new BasicStroke(5.0f)); See BorderFactory BasicStroke


1

BorderFactory has a method that accepts two parameters - the Color and thickness border = BorderFactory.creatLineBorder(Color.RED, thickness); Alternatively, you can use the LineBorder class to generate a thicker line border LineBorder border = new LineBorder(Color.RED, thickness) panel.setBorder(border);


1

The question is not duplicate of another question because that question refers to a line border for one side Yes, it is a duplicate, because the API shows you how to use an MatteBorder with an Icon on a single side. So all you need to do is create a "Dashed Line Icon". See the example posted in my code below. Or a second option, not listed in the ...


1

You're accessing the JFrame's JRootPane, a component that holds a JLayeredPane, a component which holds the contentPane, a component which holds your JPanels: * Reference I suggest that you not do what you're trying to do since your method of getting references is very brittle and will break if you change the structure of your GUI. Instead use fields to ...


1

You should probably use something more like... for (Component comp: menuMealsBar.getComponents()) { if (comp instanceof JToggleButton) { JToggleButton jtb = (JToggleButton)comp; As you shouldn't make assumptions about what a container actually contains (you'd be surprised a lot of the time ;)) Another solution might be to do something ...


1

@Override public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) { //jtb.setBorder(BorderFactory.createMatteBorder(0, 0, 5, 0, Color.white)); } You can get the component from the MouseEvent: @Override public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) { JToggleButton button = (JToggleButton)e.getSource(); ...


1

You wouldn't use individual JPanels to draw each Polygon. You would use a single class that extends JPanel, then overrides the paintComponent() method to draw the Polygons. More info here. Once you've drawn your Polygons to the JPanel, you can use the Polygon.contains() method to test whether the mouse was inside a JPanel. More info on that in the API.



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