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Trust me, it isn't something you can do. I wouldn't touch the thing with a pole long various meters... http://ijg.org/ Here there is the site of: IJG is an informal group that writes and distributes a widely used free library for JPEG image compression. The first version was released on 7-Oct-1991. There is the source code for libjpeg. if you just ...


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One faster alternative to ImageIO is ImageMagick, there are various wrappers for interfacing ImageMagick via Java such as JMagick To get a BufferedImage from JMagick you must first get an instance of MagickImage which can be done like so: ImageInfo info = new ImageInfo(pathToImage); MagickImage image = new MagickImage(info); Now you can use the method ...


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The jpeg uses a lossy compression method to achieve smaller file sizes. Unfortunately, that very method directly affects the value of (some) pixels, thereby destroying the information the way you have embedded it. You need to save the file in a lossless format to avoid this problem, such as bmp or png. Jpeg steganography is somewhat more complex to code, ...


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Progressive JPG is a image format, that contains low quality snapshots No, that’s not true¹. It is only one image – but saved in a way, that some ”broad”, lower-detail information is encoded first, and then more detailed data is coming later on, so that rendering can start early in lower quality, and as more details become available, the rendering can ...


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No, you can't do this purely with PHP. You can only output a single image, and you explicitly state 'I do not want multiple rectangles in the same canvas'. You would need to create multiple references in your HTML, probably passing parameters to be used by PHP in creating the image: <img src="/path/to/php?width=100&height=200"> <img ...


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iText doesn't change a singe byte of a JPG image. It just takes the bytes it receives and puts them inside the PDF in a stream defining the /Filter as /DCTDecode, so there should be no problem importing JPG images. However, looking at your code, I see that you expect the Image object to load the file from an URL: new java.net.URL(url1) and I remember people ...


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Look at http://www.romeolight.com/products/bpgconv/ for nice Windows converter. 2 things to mention: Currently there is options menu in top right of window. And all BPG pictures are saved into folder on your desktop called bpg_encoded. Martin


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I took a look at the JPEG format, and to my understanding a final EOI (end-of-image) segment of two bytes (FF D9) should be last. boolean jpegEnded(String path) throws IOException { try (RandomAccessFile fh = new RandomAccessFile(path, "r")) { long length = fh.length(); if (length < 10L) { // Or whatever return false; ...


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The only way to tell for certain if a JPEG image is corrupted is to decompress it. You ask if there is a quick way. You could certainty trade off speed for accuracy. The simplest way would be to check to see if the stream has an SOI marker at the front and an EOI marker at the end. Next up, you could try parsing the markers to ensure they have valid ...


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Probably not the best of answers, but... The jpeginfo program you mentioned is in C. So that brings back memories of when I wanted to use code written by the Navy (That was in C++) in a Java application that I was developing. I had two options: Link my java code to the C++ (C in your case) library using JNI (Java Native Interface). Translate the C++ ...


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First of all, it is generally recommended to use route helpers, rather than specify controllers and actions. So your code could be <%= button_to "Print Bill[PDF]", bill_print_path(@bill, format: :pdf) %> <%= button_to "Print Bill[JPG]", bill_print_path(@bill, format: :jpeg) %> and in your controller def print # insert here code to find ...



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