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21

SwingWorker is ideal for this. The example below performs a simple iteration in the background, while reporting progress and intermediate results in a window. You can pass whatever parameters you need in a suitable SwingWorker constructor. import java.awt.EventQueue; import java.awt.GridLayout; import java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent; import ...


17

If you don't want to replace the user's chosen Look & Feel, you can just replace the UI delegate with one derived from BasicProgressBarUI. import java.awt.Color; import java.awt.EventQueue; import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.Graphics2D; import java.awt.Rectangle; import java.awt.RenderingHints; import javax.swing.JComponent; import ...


17

You can use: Initialising: progressBar.setStringPainted(true); Updating: progressBar.setValue(newValue); progressBar.setString(newValue + "%");


16

I realize I'm resurrecting a very old thread here but I came across it in my googling today, so... If you want to monitor progress it's better as EJP suggests to let the system deal with the chunk size so it can optimize the transfer. The way to monitor is to write a wrapper class for ReadableByteChannel that you use to pass progress messages whenever its ...


16

Here is a basic example, this basically uses a SwingWorker to scan the root directory of your drive and lists all the files. Once that's completed, it will attempt to read each file, in it's own SwingWorker updating the table as it goes. Disclaimer: This is an example. I use a Thread.sleep to slow the reads down slightly, ignore the buffers and a few ...


16

Ah ha - looks like I can modify the UI: setUI(new BasicProgressBarUI() { protected Color getSelectionBackground() { return Color.black; } protected Color getSelectionForeground() { return Color.white; } }); This was a bit confusing, since the use of Foreground and Background weren't intuitive. Background is the color of the text when ...


14

For earlier versions, you might try addTab() with a suitable implementation of Icon used to indicate progress. import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import java.util.Random; import javax.swing.*; public class JTabbedTest { public static void main(String[] args) { EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() { private final ...


13

I think that these values are right for you UIManager.put("ProgressBar.background", Color.ORANGE); UIManager.put("ProgressBar.foreground", Color.BLUE); UIManager.put("ProgressBar.selectionBackground", Color.RED); UIManager.put("ProgressBar.selectionForeground", Color.GREEN);


13

You thread executes SwingUtilities.invokeLater. You're effectively running on Swing's Event Dispatch Thread. Not sure what are you trying to achieve. But it looks like you are blocking EDT and your while loop is not updated as MySetValue is not executed. Consider using SwingWorker for lengthy operations. How to Use Progress Bars demonstrates use of ...


11

The Swing tutorial about progress bars (and showing progress in general) is a very good place to start. It shows you how to perform long-lasting operations on a worker thread by using a SwingWorker, and updating your UI at certain intervals to show progress of the long-lasting operation to the user. There is another tutorial available for more information on ...


11

You might like to wait with style ;) Here's a WebStart demo app Here's a screen shot:


9

You've got a classic problem with concurrency and Swing. Your problem is that you're doing a long-running task on the main Swing thread, the EDT or Event Dispatch Thread, and this will lock the thread until the process is complete, preventing it from doing its tasks including interacting with the user and drawing GUI graphics. The solution is to do the ...


8

Call setIndeterminate(true). From the javadocs: To indicate that a task of unknown length is executing, you can put a progress bar into indeterminate mode. While the bar is in indeterminate mode, it animates constantly to show that work is occurring. As soon as you can determine the task's length and amount of progress, you should update the ...


8

I have just written this utility for you :) (It takes me about 3 hours): import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import java.awt.event.WindowAdapter; import java.awt.event.WindowEvent; import java.beans.PropertyChangeEvent; import java.beans.PropertyChangeListener; import ...


8

Gotta love code from the internet...oh... The code you have violates the singe thread rules of Swing and thus, is a bad example. You have a number of options with SwingWorker. You could publish the progress and use the process method to update the progress bar or you could use a PropertyChangeListener and monitor progress change events created by calling ...


8

Several things: There are four rules to follow with SwingWorker. You can refer to this diagram: . So, this code: @Override public String doInBackground() { //download here label.setText("test"); violates that rule. Your label.setText() should be moved to the constructor. To send "updates" to Swing components (like your progress bar) you want ...


7

The java code for a Windows native look-and-feel progress bar renders using PROGRESSCHUNKSIZE steps in the manner of the original windows progress bar. Please see the source for the Windows JProgressBar. It's just not rendering it smoothly. If you step the progress bar you can see the chunks. It may be customizable, but I don't know how you would ...


7

The main problem is, you are blocking the Event Dispatch Thread, by doing a long running task on the GUI EDT. Rather use SwingWorker. Here is a small example: import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.Cursor; import java.awt.Insets; import java.awt.Toolkit; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import ...


7

You'll need a TableCellRenderer that contains a JProgressBar, as shown here. You can update each file's progress from a SwingWorker, seen here.


7

You don't need this line: ClassA.progressBar.update(ClassA.progressBar.getGraphics()); Calling setValue() will update the progress bar UI. Otherwise there is nothing wrong with the code you posted here. The issue must lie elsewhere. Here's a SSCCE based on your code, which works as expected with no paint issues. public class ClassA { static ...


7

You should set the setStringPainted property to true: progressBar.setStringPainted(true); progressBar.setForeground(Color.blue); progressBar.setString("10%");


7

But it gives me hard time to achieve that because after JDialog appears it doesn't show any components (including JProgressBar) until the logic in main thread (SwingUtilities) is done. you have issue with Concurrency in Swing, Swing is single threaded and all updates must be done on EventDispatchThread, there are two ways easies to use ...


7

Sorry, I still could not find the motivation to actually read your code, but just threw together this example based on the question. See if it gives you some ideas. Note that it is an SSCCE and uses just 40 lines of code in all. import java.awt.event.*; import javax.swing.*; class CountDownProgressBar { Timer timer; JProgressBar progressBar; ...


7

Per the Java tutorial, How to Use Progress Bars: JProgressBar(int) JProgressBar(int, int, int) - Create a progress bar with the specified orientation, which can be either JProgressBar.HORIZONTAL or JProgressBar.VERTICAL. The optional second and third arguments specify minimum and maximum values.


7

import javax.swing.*; import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import java.awt.image.*; public class ImageOnTab { ImageOnTab() { final BufferedImage image = new BufferedImage( 32,32,BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB); final JTabbedPane pane = new JTabbedPane(); ImageIcon icon = new ImageIcon(image); ...


7

Your current code shows no creation of a background thread, but rather it shows you trying to queue code on the Swing thread from within the Swing thread which doesn't make sense for this problem (although there are occasional times when you may want to do this, but again, not here). The only way for this to succeed is to use a background thread. The ...


6

Something like one in every 30 questions tagged java here has the same solution as yours. You are doing all your work inside an event handler, which means that it's happening on the Event Dispatch Thread -- and blocks all further GUI updates until it's over. You must use a SwingWorker and delegate your work to it.


6

I need a very simple (skeletal) tutorial on progress bars for developing a GUI in Java. How to Use Progress Bars Concurrency in Swing Initial Threads Event Dispatch Thread SwingWorker examples here


6

Use a background thread (such as one provided by a SwingWorker) to run a for loop going from 1 to 10 with a Thread.sleep inside of the loop. Then if it is a determinate mode JProgressBar, you can update its value by passing 10 * the loop index to the progress bar (taking care to do so on the Swing thread, the EDT, of course). Edit: @James Poulson: If you're ...


6

Could I create the new thread when the action is performed and call the new functions in the thread, or should I do the threading within the actual function itself? You can start a SwingWorker from your button's handler, as shown here. A related example implementing Runnable is seen here.



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