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2

Your expected result is not meaningful as a JSON! On a JSON object, the property keys must be unique. When property keys are repeated, JSON parsers will usually only keep the last one's value, disregarding the rest. You can, however, obtain something like this: { "num_of_vulns": 2, "lib": "libxml2", "license": "permissive", "vulns": ...


0

Command: $ jq -cn --stream 'fromstream(1|truncate_stream(inputs))' array_of_objects.json | jq 'select(.batters.batter[].type == "Chocolate") | .id' Output: "0001" "0003" The first invocation of jq converts the array of objects into a stream of objects. The second is based on your invocation and can be tailored further to your needs. Of course the ...


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A hacky workaround with less backslashing could be: jq -r ".[] | \"Result is: \" + (.a|tojson)" [REVISED to reflect OP goal.]


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Since you're trying to output double quotes in a double quoted string, you need to escape the inner quotes. And to escape the inner quotes, you need to also escape the escaping backslashes. So a literal double quote would have to be entered as \\\". You can do this a little cleaner by using string interpolation instead of regular string concatenation. jq ...


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You need to escape the slashes to escape a " $ echo [{"a" : "b"}] | jq-win64.exe --raw-output ".[] | \"Result is: \\\"\" + .a + \"\\\".\"" Result is: "b".


1

Select those who do not have target; that way, you do not use del: jq -r 'select(has("target") | not)'


2

Building on your approach, you could, for example, simply write: jq '[.events[]|.severity|contains("WARNING")] | any' Or more succinctly: jq 'any(.events[].severity; contains("WARNING"))' If you want to test for the condition in ANY object, no matter where it is, then consider using walk/1.


3

You can use the raw output (-r) that will unescape characters: jq -r .c myfile.json | jq .id ADDENDUM: This has the advantage that it works in jq 1.3 and up; indeed, it should work in every version of jq that has the -r option.


2

jq has the fromjson builtin for this: jq '.c | fromjson | .id' myFile.json fromjson was added in version 1.4.


1

Taking Santiago's answer one step further, you could write: $ jq -r '.[] | "port_script.sh \"\(.name)\" \"\(.port1)\" \"\(.port2)\" \"\(.port3)\""' With your input, this produces: port_script.sh "jms1" "24000" "25000" "26000" port_script.sh "jms2" "24001" "25000" "26001" Or better yet perhaps: $ jq -r --arg command port_script.sh '.[] | $command + ...


0

What you're trying to attempt is pretty much unclear, but here's some possibly helpful pointers: To get the values your script needs, just refer to them with the .foo syntax. For example, running jq -r '.[].name' over the given input file would produce the following output: jms1 jms2 Similarly, you can refer to all of them: jq -r '.[] | .name, .port1, ...


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I know in JavaScript you could do this array.forEach(function(a) { console.log(Object.keys(a)); }); Object.keys is particularly handy because it lets you get keys of an object. Then just iterate over an array and log to console https://jsfiddle.net/f8rbdn85/


1

echo 'asw|uduu|sssdd' | jq -Rc 'split("|")' produces: ["asw","uduu","sssdd"] The "-c" option is inessential here - it just compacts the output. echo 'A:1|B:1|C:1' | jq -Rc 'split("|") | map( split(":") | {(.[0]): .[1]} ) | add' produces: {"A":"1","B":"1","C":"1"} To understand how the last one works, run the leftmost part of the pipeline first, ...


3

@csv only works on a flat array, so you could add '| .[] | @csv' to your pipeline.


1

The original tag for this question was jq so here is a jq solution: .[] | keys[] For example, with the input as shown in the question: $ jq '.[] | keys[]' input.json "identifier1" "identifier2"


0

The good news is that there's a simple solution to the problem: map( if .url | test("http://otherdomain.com.*filenameB.*") then .url |= sub( "http://otherdomain.com.*filenameB.*"; "http://yetanotherdomain.com/new/path/to/filenameC.tar.gz") else . end) The not-so-good news is that it's not so easy to explain unless you ...


0

you'll use a foreach loop on your JSON object. for(var i=0;i<JSONARRAY.length;i++){ var obj = JSONARRAY[i]; for(var key in obj){ var attrName = key; var attrValue = obj[key]; } }


0

The double-quotes in the original (i.e., the interior double-quotes) must be escaped, as discussed in the Windows section of the jq FAQ. Thus your example would become: jq -r ".\"FOO-BAR\"[] | .foo+ \" \" + .bar[]"


2

The problem is that jq is still just outputting lines of text; you can't necessarily preserve each array element as a single unit. That said, as long as a newline is not a valid character in any object, you can still output each object on a separate line. get_json_array | jq -c '.[]' | while read object; do api_call "$object" done Of course, under ...


0

(1) Slightly briefer than the accepted answer: jq -r '[.object] + (.attributes[] | [.type, .description, .value]) | @csv' (2) If you don't want the quotation marks, then one possibility would be: jq -r '"\(.object)," + (.attributes[] | "\(.type),\(.description),\(.value)")'


3

It looks like you're building up CSV data, the @csv filter was made for this. You just need to collect an array of the values you want to write out and pass it in to the filter. You could do this: $ jq -r '.attributes[] as $attr | [.object, $attr.type, $attr.description, $attr.value] | @csv' input.json Which produces this: ...


1

The following approach using index/1 is similar to what was originally sought (".b in [1, 7]"), and might be noticeably faster than using .[] within select if the whitelist is large. If your jq supports --argjson: jq --argjson w '[1,7]' '. as $in | select($w | index($in.b))' Otherwise: jq --arg w '[1,7]' '. as $in | ($w|fromjson) as $w | select($w | ...


2

First of all, .foo.bar is just shorthand syntax for .["foo"]["bar"]. Use the latter for non-alphanumeric values such as api-client. Secondly, you should never compose jq scripts by interpolating shell variables into them. Instead, pass values to them using --arg. That is, instead of doing this: ${JQ} -r ".projects.\"${PROJECT}\"" ${CACHE} You should ...


2

Doing $value in $collection could be achieved using the pattern select($value == $collection[]). So your filter should be this: [1, 7] as $whitelist | select(.b == $whitelist[]) Having the array in a variable has its benefits as it lets you change the whitelist easily using arguments. $ jq --argjson whitelist '[2, 7]' 'select(.b == $whitelist[])'


1

There was a bug/misfeature in jq 1.5 that explains the anomaly you evidently found (it has to do with the fact that your first invocation does not have an explicit filter). Using a more recent version (available via github): $ jq --version jq-1.5rc2-146-gd228490 $ echo "{}" | jq -scaM --unbuffered | jq [ {} ]


1

The simplest complete jq query is this: echo "{}" | jq . Do you want to append the periods and see how it'd go?


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Use the jq -C (colorize) option, with more -r or less -r.


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You can use jq '.[] | .login, .id' to obtain each login followed by its id.


1

Apart from not using jq at all, you have two main options: (1) pre-processing the non-JSON to make it JSON (2) using the -R command-line option, e.g. echo "X-RateLimit-Reset: 1452786798" | jq -R 'split(:)' [ "X-RateLimit-Reset", " 1452786798" ] Thus, if you know the value is going to be numeric: echo "X-RateLimit-Reset: 1452786798" | jq -Rc ...


1

Rather than trying to use two invocations of jq, just use one. Also, it's generally best to quote your jq filters when they're given on the command line. You're dumping the values in the ids property, so: jq ".ids[]" [EDIT: using double-quotes works here for both Windows and many other platforms, but on non-Windows platforms, single-quotes are usually ...


0

Try this script and see if it does what you want. Rather than depending on cURL to fetch the JSON, it uses an XMLHTTPRequest. Rather than depending on jq to deserialize the JSON, it uses the JavaScript JSON parser. And unlike Aacini's solution, it works the same regardless of whether the JSON is minified, beautified, whatever. Save it with a .bat ...


1

Perhaps this may help you? @echo off for /F "tokens=2 delims=[]" %%a in (input.txt) do ( for %%b in (%%a) do ( echo %%b ) ) Output example: C:\> type input.txt {"ids":[80001]} C:\> test.bat 80001 C:\> type input.txt {"ids":[12001,12002,12003,43120]} C:\> test.bat 12001 12002 12003 43120


1

The answer to the question is essentially "yes". Commands such as "jq --slurp . FILE ...." store the parsed input as an array in memory. This will often require more memory than the size of the input itself -- consider for example that JSON objects are stored as hash tables. With jq 1.5 there are often better alternatives than "slurping" the input. Most ...



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