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For me, <br/> didn't work and \n did. My configuration: jQuery.jqplot(element, configuration.series, { stackSeries: true, animate: false, captureRightClick: false, seriesColors: ['green', 'blue', 'yellow', 'orange', 'red'], seriesDefaults: { renderer: jQuery.jqplot.BarRenderer, ...


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For bar charts and line charts, use the following options: grid: { drawGridlines: false, background: 'transparent', borderColor: 'transparent', shadow: false } For Donut charts, use : grid: { borderWidth:0, shadow:false }


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The solution of Julien Grenier is nice but it's headache when you don't know the name of your series. For example automatically bounded from DB. There is no need to change the jqplot.highlighter.js. It's not documented but you have tooltipContentEditor highlighter: { // you can have anything here tooltipFormatString: '<b&...


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Just in case someone is looking for an answer. Add following lines to the core jqplot lib at line 9201. if ($(el).css('background-color') && $(el).css('width') && $(el).css('height')){ newContext.fillStyle = $(el).css('background-color'); newContext.fillRect(left, top, $(el).css('width'), $(el).css('height')); }


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What you have above is a mix of loops and linq, which can get confusing because you are mixing iterative with set based logic. If you expand the code out as just loops, you may find it easier to translate to linq. As all loops var seriesDataLineList = new List<SeriesDataPointArray>(); foreach (var tree in trees) { ...


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You can manipulate the jqplot-xaxis-tick divs after they are created, and assign them the y values from your s1 data array. $(document).ready(function() { var s1 = [ [1, 10], [2, 5] ]; plot1 = $.jqplot('chart1', [s1], { seriesColors: ["#EB2300", "#FFCC00"], seriesDefaults: { renderer: $.jqplot.BarRenderer, rendererOptions: {...



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