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4

delegate is not recommended for use in newer jQuery, you should use on As of jQuery 1.7, .delegate() has been superseded by the .on() method. $('#table').on('mouseenter mouseleave', 'td.foo', function(e) { if(e.type === 'mouseenter') { //hover in } else { //hover out } });


4

Is this what you're looking for: jsFiddle example. jQuery $('div.trigger').on('click', '#trigger', function() { $('#panel').toggle('fast'); });​ Also, as of jQuery 1.7, .delegate() has been superseded by the .on() method.


3

As of jQuery 1.7, .delegate() has been superseded by the .on() method. For earlier versions, however, it remains the most effective means to use event delegation. More information on event binding and delegation is in the .on() method. In general, these are the equivalent templates for the two methods: $(elements).delegate(selector, events, data, handler); ...


3

Short answer: Yes Long answer: As of jQuery 1.7+ .on() is prefered before the two you have mentioned, they are deprecated. This is an example on .on(): $('#parent').on("click", "span.children", function() { if ( confirm("Are you sure?") ) { console.log(this); } });


3

You can use custom events:(it IS still an event, but YOUR event ) markup: <div id='mePlease'> <div id='noWay'>Hi</div> </div> $('#mePlease').on('wacky','#noWay',function(){ alert('wackyEnough'); }); $('#noWay').trigger('wacky'); but really, this could be done with a simple function call.


3

There is no need in quotes for document in the first selector: // v------v-------- 'document' should be an object, not a string $(document).delegate(".seeMore a", "click", function() { ... });


3

There are several problem to your code: You are using IDs in your "line" variable. ID must be unique within an HTML document. You'd better use name attributes, or create a new line differently so you can change the IDs. Why do you delegate the 'click' event for the 'Add' button ? Event delegation is used be able to automatically "bind" events to elements ...


2

The purpose of these functions is to delegate functionality to events; so no, you can't omit the events parameter from either of these function calls. I suspect what you want is to "do stuff" to some elements that are loaded after page-load (asynchronously), no? Maybe you also need to do this stuff to elements that already exist on page-load? In that case ...


2

jQuery Live() Method And Event Bubbling


2

.on() is different from .delegate() Correct syntax for .on() is - on( events [, selector ] [, data ], handler(eventObject) ) You need this : $("#content").on("click",".pagination a", function(event){ alert("asdasdasd") }) http://api.jquery.com/on/ http://api.jquery.com/delegate/


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$("#content").on("click",".pagination a", function(event){ alert("asdasdasd") }) Switch to the above definition


1

You could solve this by reinitialize the jscolor object in the append event. $("body").on('click', 'div .add', function(){ $("#some-id").append('<input type="text" name="color" class="color">'); new jscolor.init(); });


1

Your callback solution would work perfectly, except you're calling the callback in the wrong place: // function 1 function function_1(callback) { // replicating something that takes a while // alert("1"); setTimeout(function() { $("p").append("This should happen first."); callback(); // <=== Here, when the thing is done }, ...


1

First off, if your .reject buttons on all your dialogs all have the same behavior and class names, then you can just leave the one delegated event handler in place and you don't need to install it again or remove the prior one. The beauty of using delegated event handling is that the target objects can come and go and the event handler remains in place just ...


1

Since .live() is deprecated you better to use .on() like $('div.collapsed').on('mouseover', function () { or can use like $(document).on('mouseover','div.collapsed', function () { Because You can’t use .live() for reusable widgets. stopPropagation() doesn't work with live. live() is slower. live() is not chainable. and the .on() method provides all ...


1

You still have .bind(). Example $(".trash").bind('click', function(event) {


1

You'd be better delegating the event handler to $(document) rather than $(".trash') as it means you're not relying on it existing.


1

try $(document).delegate('.delete_gallery', 'click', function(event) {


1

Simply make the element no longer match the selector: http://jsfiddle.net/JcmpN/3/ $('#product-list').on('click.productRemoveOn', 'a.removeWithOn:not(.ignore)', function (e) { var $this = $(this).addClass("ignore"), ...


1

Use :first-child, it works $("#first").delegate(".ask div:first-child","click",function(e){ alert("hi"); }); $("#second").delegate(".ask div:first-child","click",function(e){ alert("hello"); }) ;​ And it works with .on


1

I have tried it and you are right, it's not working. This code worked though: $("#first").on("click",".ask div:nth-child(1)",function(e){ alert("hi"); }); $("#second").on("click",".ask div:nth-child(1)",function(e){ alert("hello"); });​


1

Since .on()s purpose it to attach event-handlers to a certain element, it makes absolutely no sense to use it without an event. That's why the event parameter is required. From the doc: Description: Attach an event handler function for one or more events to the selected elements.


1

Yes, you can, but both methods have been superseded in favour of on() on recent versions of jQuery. Also, live() always attaches the event handler to the (top of the) document, whilst delegate() allows you to choose where to attach the events, thus it can be more efficient if you know before hand where the element is going to be.


1

You should use .on(). And you should never use .live(). For a performance test between the three see: http://jsperf.com/jquery-live-vs-delegate-vs-on Besides the fact that .live() is deprecated it is also very slow compared to the other two. Basically what you are doing with .on() or .delegate() is add eventhandlers to elements within a container whether ...


1

Yes, you could do this, but you could use .on method instead, and don't use .live, it is deprecated. $(elements).delegate(selector, events, data, handler); // jQuery 1.4.3+ $(elements).on(events, selector, data, handler); // jQuery 1.7+


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jQuerys .live() and .delegate() method work on the principle that events may "bubble" up the DOM tree. That is the short story, sounds easy, well it indeed is pretty easy. Having a DOM structure like <html> <body> <div> <span>Foobar</span> </div> </body> </html> If a ...


1

First of all, the code you supplied is not very clear. What is what? However, if I understand it correctly, the problem is that the HTML generated by Picasa plugin is not ready before the lightBox plugin is instantiated. The code from the lightBox website: $(function() { $('#gallery a').lightBox({fixedNavigation:true}); }); So you need to do 2 things: ...


1

"...what is the purpose of what comes before the .delegate?" A delegate is bound to .some_element_class element. That delegate is triggered for every click that takes place inside .some_element_class That delegate tests what was clicked, so your handler function will only run if... the actual element clicked matches the "a" selector, or any ancestor ...


1

This reduces event binding. This basically sets an event on a tags ONLY within the elements with class .some_element_class without actually binding an event to a tags directly. http://api.jquery.com/delegate/ http://api.jquery.com/on/ As of jQuery 1.7, .delegate() has been superseded by the .on() method. For earlier versions, however, it remains the ...


1

it means delegate() is invoked on the .some_event_class. and the a is selector string, click is event type string & function() is eventhandler function. delegate() method is used to handle the "live event" and for static events bind() is used. I hope this helps. feel free to ask if you have any doubts Differences between bind() & delegate() ...



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