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0

This seems to work for my own uses... $('.item').filter(function() { return $(this).parents('.item').length == 0; }); This returns only the #outer div. <div class="item" id="outer"> <div class="item" id="inner"></div> </div>


0

You can inject jQuery using (clientScripts or remoteScripts) into the page and select elements based on that in the page context (inside casper.evaluate()): var casper = require('casper').create({ remoteScripts: [ 'http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.2.min.js' ] }); casper.start(url, function(){ var text = this.evaluate(function(){ ...


0

James Padolsey created a wonderful filter that allows regex to be used for selection. jQuery.expr[':'].regex = function(elem, index, match) { var matchParams = match[3].split(','), validLabels = /^(data|css):/, attr = { method: matchParams[0].match(validLabels) ? matchParams[0].split(':')[0] : 'attr', ...


0

Another option to select multiple types: $('#btn-panel a, #btn-panel input[type="button"],[type="submit"]')


0

Use explicit $.parseHTML(). Quoting the docs: Most jQuery APIs that accept HTML strings will run scripts that are included in the HTML. jQuery.parseHTML does not run script in the parsed HTML unless keepScripts is explicitly true. However, even doing this is not secure. However, it is still possible in most environments to execute script ...


1

You are writing the css function wrong. Try the following: $( "#button" ).click(function() { $('tr#g2 select').css('pointer-events', 'none'); });


0

That selector checks if the style attribute is exactly that string, so it won't work if you have other things in the style attribute. It would be kind of inefficient, but you could loop through each element that you want to check, and for each one do: if(<my-element>.css("<style:attr>") == "<value") { //do stuff with the element }


0

I ended up using something similiar to billyonecan's answer: $(document).ready(function(){ function test(element) { var all = element.find('.b'); var exclude = element.find('.js-test .b'); var test = all.not(exclude); console.log(test.length); } console.clear(); test($('.js-1')); test($('.js-2')); ...


0

Personally, what I've done in the past is give them a common class id and used that to select them. It may not be ideal as they have a class specified that may not exist, but it makes the selection a hell of a lot easier. Just make sure you're unique in your classnames. i.e. for the example above I'd use your selection by class. Better still would be to ...


0

Might be you want this Check the manual here $( "input[name$='letter']" ); or $("input[name^='name[']");


1

Might be you want this $("input[name$=name]"); Select all elements with a name attribute value ending with name. Check Manual


0

Use jQuery's Attribute Ends With Selector ($=) to match things at the end of the attribute: $("input[name$='name']") Description: Selects elements that have the specified attribute with a value ending exactly with a given string. The comparison is case sensitive. If you want to match input elements whose name attribute ends in "[0]", you'd use: ...


1

The .selector property is deprecated and can only be used when the jQuery element set was created by passing a selector string directly. As you have seen, .selector stops representing a valid selector altogether once you start chaining traversal or filtering methods from the original set. Judging from the sort of values that .selector can have it would seem ...


0

I got it! function findTextAndReturnRemainder(target, variable){ var chopFront = target.substring(target.search(variable)+variable.length,target.length); var result = chopFront.substring(0,chopFront.search(";")); return result; } var text = $($('script')).text(); var findAndClean = findTextAndReturnRemainder(text,"var foo ="); var result = ...


1

var cheerio = require('cheerio'); $ = cheerio.load(html); Then you should have your text by $('script')[0].text() for instance. If it's always a "var foo = {"b":"bar","c":"cat"}" pattern that you parse then you could do something like this to get the object: var text = $('script')[0].text(); var str = text.substr(text.indexOf('{'), text.indexOf('}')); ...


1

The selector .b :not(.js-test .b) finds descendants of .b elements that are not .js-test .b elements. The problem with this selector is twofold: Every .b element is a descendant of a .js-test element. This includes the .b elements immediately nested within each context .js-test element that you are testing. The space between the first .b and the :not() ...


0

Try // descendant `.b` of `element`, // descendant `.b` of `element`, not `.b`, not `.js-test` var test2 = element.find("> .b, > :not(.b):not(.js-test) .b"); jsfiddle http://jsfiddle.net/ku2pdn2j/4/ $(document).ready(function(){ function test(element) { var test2 = element.find("> .b, > :not(.b):not(.js-test) ...


1

You'd have to do some filtering to only count occurrences of .b where the closest .js-test equals element: element.find('.b').filter(function() { return $(this).closest('.js-test').is(element); }).length; Here's a fiddle


0

Use the :not() selector to exclude nested .target. $('.container .target:not(.container .container .target)') Check out this example - http://jsbin.com/babiviziye/1/edit?html,js,output


0

I used this to sort a gallery of images where the sort array would be altered by an ajax call. Hopefully it can be useful to someone. var myArray = ['2', '3', '1']; var elArray = []; $('.imgs').each(function() { elArray[$(this).data('image-id')] = $(this); }); $.each(myArray,function(index,value){ $('#container').append(elArray[value]); ...


1

Updated, actually I tested your two jQuery selectors in your question, and those were working correctly based on my test :-) The length of how many elements are found based on the query are printed to the console. $("#firstInput").focus(); // set focus console.log($('tr:has(input:visible)').not('tr:has(input:focus)').length) // 2 ...


2

You could use .filter() to return tr elements with input elements that aren't focused. In this case, .is(':focus') is used to determine whether the child input is focused. If it isn't, then it is returned and added to the collection of tr elements. Example Here var tr = $('tr:has(input:visible)').filter(function () { return !$('input', ...


1

You can simply use .each() to achieve the goal here: $(".myLinks a").each(function(i){ this.id=i; }); Working Demo


2

Just change the selector : $('.field.typevisible').fadeIn('slow'); Only elements having both classes will fade in.


0

You can extend the selector capabilities in jQuery: $.extend($.expr[":"], { withAttrLike: function(elem, _, m) { var attrs = elem.attributes, pattern = new RegExp(m[3]); for (var i = 0; i < attrs.length; ++i) if (pattern.test(attrs[i].name)) return true; return false; } }); Now you can write: ...


1

All of the current answers assume that the .foo clicked on will be the only .foo with the class bar. ... if that is always the case, then great, but note that these answers aren't direct substitutions for what you've got (since you look for all .foo's with the class bar). The following would be a more direct substitution: var foos = $('.foo').on('click', ...


0

If you are using id for each parent element, you can use something like : $('.foo').on('click', function () { $('#'+this.id).removeClass('bar'); // it will remove child class bar )};


0

Use this simple logic: If X has a class Y, remove class Y from X. Here is the code: $('.foo').on('click', function () { $self = $(this); if($self.hasClass('bar')) $self.removeClass('bar'); }); Readup: .hasClass() | jQuery .removeClass() | jQuery


0

You could use is or hasClass to check to see if the current element also has the bar class: $('.foo').on('click', function () { $self = $(this); $self.is('.bar') && $self.removeClass('bar'); });


0

Method 1 hasClass() $self.hasClass("bar") && $self.removeClass('bar'); Method 2 is() $seld.is(".bar") && $self.removeClass('bar'); Method 3 filter() $seld.filter(".bar").removeClass('bar');


1

You need to find the input-field in your cloned div and set that to nothing. $(function () { $(".tag button").on("click", function () { var $tag = $(this).parent(".tag"); var $clone = $tag.clone(true); $tag.after($clone); $clone.find("input[type='text']").val(""); }); }); I set up the vars for your current ...


0

This works fine $('input[type="radio"][class="className"]:checked').val() Working Demo The :checked selector works for checkboxes, radio buttons, and select elements. For select elements only, use the :selected selector. API for :checked Selector


0

You should use this clone.html("<p>value</p>"); OR clone.text("value"); The .val() method is primarily used to get the values of form elements such as input, select and textarea. In the case of select elements, it returns null when no option is selected and an array containing the value of each selected option when there is at least one ...


0

If you use jQuery built-in after() with empty value it will create a dynamic object that will match your :after CSS selector. $('.active').after().click(function () { alert('clickable!'); }); See the jQuery documentation.


0

Given a list of elements, you can use jQuery.not to exclude those elements from another selector $(function(){ // I want to process every div containing attr 3 and 4 var divs = $('div[data-attr="3"], div[data-attr="4"]'); console.log(divs); // logs 2 var notDivs = $('div[data-attr]').not(divs); console.log(notDivs); ...


3

Make it steps by steps. First, select all div: var $div = $('div[data-attr]'); Then, select those you need: var $valid_div = $div.filter(function(){ return attrList.indexOf($(this).data('attr')) > -1; }); Now you can do your operation on matching div with your variable: $valid_div.operation_here(); To select remaining div, you can use ...


0

var $divs = $('div').filter(function() { // returns all divs with data-attr not equal 1 or 2 or 5 return [1, 2, 5].indexOf(this.data('attr')) == -1; }); HTML: <div data-attr="2">not matched</div> <div data-attr="5">not matched</div> <div data-attr="6">matched</div>


0

You need to use .filter() instead of .find() in statement. Use $photos.filter(".current"); instead of $photos.find(".current"); to test for the last item, so if the current item is last You can use .is() yourElement.is(':last')


0

Easiest way would be add a class to them, for example: <textarea class='foo'></textarea> <input type='checkbox' class='foo' /> <select class='foo'><option val='1'>1</option></select> Then query them using $('.foo') This way, you won't get/fetch something you don't want.. Alternatively, if you don't want to add a ...


1

Since you're using jQuery you can grab the nth-child of a specific selector using eq(). HTML <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"></div> <div class="col-sm-12"></div> <div class="col-sm-12"></div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"></div> <div ...


2

Just use $('section.subsection') and then either use .eq() or .each. See this fiddle for example: http://jsfiddle.net/0q3gk194/ Edit: For repeating every 4, use .each() and switch on the provided index modulo 4. Updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/0q3gk194/1/


0

You can use extremely simple selectors to do this. Select all <input> elements that aren't prepended by two others. $('div input:not(input+input+input)').click(function() { alert("x"); }); <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.0/jquery.min.js"></script> <div> <input type='checkbox' /> ...


0

Maybe it's a good idea to number the elements themselves, since it seems your program logic is dependent on the element position. CSS selectors are very powerful, but there might be an easier solution. For example: HTML: <div data-y="0"> <input type='checkbox' data-x="0"/> <input type='checkbox' data-x="1" /> <input ...


1

You need to use a selector like :nth-child(-n+2): $("body").on("click", "div input[type='checkbox']:nth-child(-n+2)", function() { alert("x"); }); This is because your :lt(2) selector was selecting all of the inputs, and then filtering to only the first 2. Here, we check if it's the first 2 children of its parent. $("body").on("click", "div ...


-2

test is javascript object. test.controlid is id of widget instance. test.value is the string you want to select. you don't need test object, you can use id and value directly. $("#" + test.controlid).parent().find("span").children("input").val(test.value); var newObject = new Object(); newObject.item = new Object(); newObject.item.option = $('#' + ...


0

document.getElementById('inputMail1').parentNode.parentNode.onclick = function(){ document.getElementById('firstName1').focus(); }; Somethink like this?


1

see code snippet. closest = search for first maching parent. siblings = search for sibling element. first = get the first matching element. find = get the first matching child element. val = get the value of the input element. (function($) { $('body').on('click', '.email', function() { var firstname = ...


0

You cna use it $('.signup-input.email').on('click',function(){<-trigger on click $(this).closest('.clearfix').find('.firstName'); <- get firstname of this clearfix });


0

How can I select the first input (firstName) on click the third element (email)? If you want to get the first input element when clicking on the third .form-text-field element: $('.form-group .form-text-field').eq(2).on('click', function () { $(this).closest('.form-group').find('.form-text-field:first input:first'); }); Example Here Or you ...


3

If you wanted to narrow the selector down further for performance reasons you could use the following: $('div.form-group > div:first > div > input:first') This would become: $(function() { $('#inputMail1 ').click(function(){ $('div.form-group > div:first > div > input:first').focus(); }); }); <script ...



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