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17

For some magical reason chrome works very badly with GWT DevMode. Random null pointer exception while parsing JSON, JSNI return types errors when working with GXT, remote death exceptions are a very common problems. It is known problem and that's why most people are not using GWT DevMode with Chrome.


14

Yes, it does: private static native void doThingWithCallback() /*-{ var self = this; var callbackFn = $entry(function(val) { self.@com.your.package.AClass.aMethod(Ljava/lang/String;)(val); }); $wnd.someApiThatTakesACallback(callbackFn); }-*/; Two things to remember: $entry() reminds GWT to keep track of the code when using the debugger. var ...


13

If you want to scroll to the top of a page just do: Window.scrollTo (0 ,0); Just be sure that you are importing the correct package com.google.gwt.user.client.Window


13

Let me explain a bit more about exporting GWT stuff to the JS world. You have several options to do that, but I will focus on three methods. 1- JSNI: The first one is to write your own jsni, in this case you have to be aware about the possible mistakes you could make. Basically these mistakes are because you have to know how to deal with types. In your case ...


12

I would try to define a callback function in the hostpage and call it from GWT at the end of the onModuleLoad() method. Hostpage function: <script type="text/javascript"> function onGwtReady() { loadGallery('blargh'); }; </script> GWT: public void onModuleLoad() { FacebookGallery facebookGallery = new ...


11

What you are trying to do does not work because GWT compiler renames all identifier names to minimize produced code size: so myFunction() exists, but it's called something else. You were looking at old version of documentation. In the latest version this is all explained: Calling a Java Method from Handwritten JavaScript The solution - add an additional ...


9

$entry is not about calling java, it's about ensuring a few things go well in GWT: exceptions are routed to the GWT.UncaughtExceptionHandler, and commands scheduled via Scheduler#scheduleEntry and Scheduler#scheduleFinally are correctly called. Your problem is the this. When the function is called, this is not your MyModule class (it's most probably the ...


9

If you want the JS script to be injected in a way that the global variables it defines are accessible through $wnd, you have to setWindow(ScriptInjector.TOP_WINDOW).


8

Since I have not received any answers, I had to have more investigation of this issue, so I performed a deeper code analysis of gwtupload project in order to understand how GWT FileUpload (which gets transformed into ) can be decorated. It turned out that element.click() will only work in browsers which support #click() method (IE, Chrome, Safari). ...


8

I have put together a short example of how to integrate d3 into GWT: https://github.com/lgrammel/d3_gwt Basically, you convert your Java objects into JavaScript objects using JSNI and pass them into the JavaScript method that contains the d3 code: https://github.com/lgrammel/d3_gwt/blob/master/src/de/larsgrammel/d3_gwt/client/D3_gwt.java ...


7

It's very easy. You need to "export" your function written in GWT (or it can be another JSNI) function. Here is the relevant documentation: http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/doc/latest/DevGuideCodingBasicsJSNI.html#calling So in your case: In your GWT code: public static void Caller() /*-{ ... }-*/ public static native void exportStaticMethod() ...


7

Pre-post edit: I wrote up this answer without actually trying to see why you were trying to do this thing, under the assumption that you were using some non-browser event, which is already wrapped up pretty nicely, and if you want more data from the NativeEvent instance, you can write JSNI methods in your own classes to get access to it, or further subclass ...


7

this is out of scope when a function defined within your javascript within the JSNI block is actually executed. Add a closure around this: public native void getCoordinates() /*-{ var that = this; function onPositionUpdate(position) { var lat = position.Wecoords.latitude; var lng = position.coords.longitude; var alt = ...


7

helloMethod is an instance method, and as such it requires the this reference to be set, when it is called. Your first example doesn't do this at call time. Your second example attempts to do this, but there's a little mistake, which one can make easily in JavaScript: The this reference in $wnd.setText = function(from) { ...


7

private native void publish(EntryPoint p) /*-{ $wnd.setText = function(from) { alert(from); p.@com.example.my.Class::helloMethod(Ljava/lang/String;)(from); } }-*/; Could you give this code a try?


7

The code of your GWT app runs in a (hidden) iframe, so document references that iframe's document (and window the iframe's browsing context). GWT thus initializes the variables $doc and $wnd to let you easily reference the document and browsing context (window) of the "host page" that loads the GWT app. Note that linkers decide how the compiled code is ...


6

If you need to invoke function by name, you need to do something like this: private static native String execute(String functionName,JavaScriptObject data)/*-{ $wnd[functionName](data); }-*/; To get reference to a function you will need to use JSNI like this: private static native JavaScriptObject getFunction(String functionName)/*-{ return ...


6

new Button(constants.print(), new ClickHandler() { @Override public void onClick(final ClickEvent event) { print(); } private native boolean print( ) /*-{ if ($wnd.print) { $wnd.print(); return true; } else { return false; ...


6

You can declare a javascript function, which will fire the non-static method. For example: package com.example; public class Layout extends VLayout() { private String nonStaticVar = "nonStaticVar"; public Layout() { declareMethod(this); } //Method which declares non-static method in javascript public native void ...


6

As outlined in the JSNI documentation on calling GWT Java from handwritten Javascript, you need to expose the showMyWindow function so your other javascript can be called. Sometime before you want to actually call showMyWindow in JS, run a function like this. public static native void exportShowMe() /*-{ $wnd.showMyWindow = ...


6

Those JSNI references do not work except in JSNI code in your java files. References to Java methods and fields in JSNI are not actually valid JavaScript, but part of the JSNI language to enable those native methods to both use Java and JavaScript. The JSNI string @com.smartgwt.client.Version::getVersion()() will be rewritten as something like $getVersion1() ...


6

Three solutions for this question: 1- Your Jsni code looks fine except that you have to enclose it in the corresponding native function and return a double (or any other number type if you want gwt to make the casting). native double getTop(String profileId) /*-{ return $wnd.$("#" + profileId).offset().top; }-*/; If you wanted to see errors through ...


6

You have to refer to the jQuery object $ as $wnd.$. When accessing the browser's window and document objects from JSNI, you must reference them as $wnd and $doc, respectively. Your compiled script runs in a nested frame, and $wnd and $doc are automatically initialized to correctly refer to the host page's window and document. ...


5

Use constructor JSONObject(JavaScriptObject jsValue) to create a new JSONObject from the supplied JavaScript value.


5

For converting your List to javascript list you can use this piece of code: private JavaScriptObject convertListToJsList(List<String> list){ JavaScriptObject jsListObject = createJsListObject(); for (String stringToAdd : list){ addStringElement(jsListObject, stringToAdd); } return jsListObject; } private native ...


5

Your test() is not static. Therefore you will need to make it static or specify an instance or make the purchase non-static. (This error is the GWT version of "Cannot make a static reference to the non-static method methodName() from the type TypeName") public native void purchase(String token) /*-{ var instance = this; var successHandler = ...


5

/*@cc_on!@*/ is not a regular expression, but a multi-line JavaScript comment (/* .. comment .. */). In Internet Explorer, this is more than a comment. The code is parsed and evaluated (this feature is called conditional compilation). The */ in your code ends the GWT-specific /*-{ section, causing the error to show up. The solution is to use a different ...


5

If I have correctly understood the question, I'd use an overlay type, something like: public class ProductJso extends JavaScriptObject { protected ProductJso() {} public final native int getId() /*-{ return this.id; }-*/; public final native int getCategoryId() /*-{ return this.categoryid; }-*/; public final native String getName() /*-{ ...


5

If you are using 2.5.x, configure and run your project in superdev mode. Enable your chrome browser to use source maps. Finally you will be brought to the exception line in the debug console of your browser.


5

Try referring to it as $doc instead of document Ref: http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/doc/latest/DevGuideCodingBasicsJSNI.html



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