New answers tagged

-1

Your sending string data instead of int data to controller. var pageindex = 0; var pagesize = 10; $.ajax({ type: 'GET', url: '/Product/GetData', data: { pageIndex : pageindex , pageSize : pagesize}, dataType: 'json', . . }); hope this helps


0

Try method: "GET" on your javascript method instead of type: "GET"


1

In this situation, to keep your processing and memory footprints low, I think I would just concatenate the files one after the other even though it results in technically invalid JSON. To deserialize the combined file later, you can take advantage of the SupportMultipleContent setting on the JsonTextReader class and process the object collections through a ...


0

Try using this technique instead when serializing your data: string correctData = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(set, new JsonSerializerSettings { NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore }); Some more information if you need it: http://www.newtonsoft.com/json/help/html/T_Newtonsoft_Json_NullValueHandling.htm


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In order to successfully serialize and deserialize polymorphic types with Json.NET, you need to set TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.Auto, like so: public class ObjectPlus { // Replace with whatever file name is appropriate. My computer doesn't have a "c:\tmp" directory. static string JsonFileName { get { return Path.Combine(Path.GetTempPath(), ...


0

You will need to add methods that produce JSON from each node recursively. Check out the related post: Serializing a Tree into Json Object.


0

If you're still experiencing problems then go for the -Force option. Uninstall-Package Newtonsoft.Json -Force Install-Package Newtonsoft.Json


0

Try var variable = Convert.ToInt32(object) Iterate the Dictionary<string,object> once and rewrite its object with this Int32, or do the Int32 conversion each time you read the object.


2

If you want to convert a list of string values into a list of nullable boolean values with a JsonConverter class, I would recommend using a JArray inside the converter instead of trying to deal with the reader directly. This will allow you to simplify your code while also avoiding the error you encountered: class NullableBoolListDeSerializer : ...


1

Are your POCOs marked with a [Serializable] attribute? If so, this may be the cause of the issue. Web API apparently ships with a Json.Net DefaultContractResolver that is configured with IgnoreSerializableAttribute = false. One of the effects of this setting is that the names of auto properties will be serialized in the format ...


1

This should allow you to convert the JObect to your Remiza type. ObjectPlus.DeserializeDictionary(); List<Object> list = ObjectPlus.GetEkstensja(typeof(Remiza)); foreach (Object o in list) { Remiza r = o.ToObject<Remiza>(); listaRemiz.Add(r); } I got this from the stackoverflow answer at the link below. If what ...


2

If your class does not have a public parameterless constructor, but does have a single public constructor with parameters, Json.NET will call that constructor, matching the arguments to the JSON properties by name and using default values for missing properties. Thus if you simply do: public class Message { public string Text { get; private set; } ...


1

You could do something like this: public class CareTaker { ... [NotMapped] [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "certification"] public int? CertificationId { get { return Certification?.Id; } set { Certification = new Certification { Id = value; } } } [JsonIgnore] ...


0

To generate properly the classes, I would suggest copying the JSON and open the file where you want to store the classes and in visual studio go to EDIT->Paste Special->Paste JSON As Classes then you would do something like this: JavaScriptSerializer ser = new JavaScriptSerializer(); var jsonToClasses = ser.Deserialize<RootObject>(json);


1

I tested this using Newtonsoft 8.0.2 and it works fine. dynamic dyn = JObject.Parse(json); string value = dyn.Path.FirstPath; Value should equal /1/2/text().


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I like sticking with attributes on this one, here is the method I use when needing to deserialize a property but not serialize it or vice versa. STEP 1 - Create the custom attribute public class JsonIgnoreSerializationAttribute : Attribute { } STEP 2 - Create a custom Contract Reslover class JsonPropertiesResolver : DefaultContractResolver { ...


0

I cannot reproduce the problem. However, you could explicitly select the JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(String, JsonSerializerSettings) overload (which does what you want) via: DadosJSon^ dadosJSon = JsonConvert::DeserializeObject<DadosJSon^>(File::ReadAllText("c:/movie.json"), (JsonSerializerSettings ^)nullptr); Passing a nullptr value for the ...


0

You are dealing with 2 different issues. Right now, your controller method is not working - therefore you Angular code will not work as expected. On the server side, you are seeing an error when you try to serialize your object to JSON. It would help to add something like the Newtonsoft JSON serializer. The controller method would then look something ...


0

Use the .net javascript serializer like so: return new JavaScriptSerializer().Deserialize<List<Account_Info>>(db.Account_Info.ToList()); Deserialize takes a generic. Check your model type. I assumed it was a list of Account_Info.


0

So I found the answer in this post. Deserialize Dynamic Json string using Newtonsoft JSON.NET Making the anonymous Object in my model an System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject Type allows the deserializer to work properly. That was it!


2

Your JSON consists of an array containing a single object: [{"name1" : "value1", ..., "nameN" : "valueN"}] The brackets indicate an array, the nested braces indicate an object. If you are unsure whether your JSON object will be nested in an array, and just want to get the first object that appears in the JSON, you can do: var dtsRoot = ...


0

Make sure you target the proper framework in VS. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb398202(v=vs.110).aspx Also make sure you're getting it from NuGet to ensure you have the most up to date version https://www.nuget.org/packages/Newtonsoft.Json/


1

Try Below Code JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Users>(content);


0

my solution(works for arrays as well): usage: rebuildJsonDotNetObj(jsonDotNetResponse) The code: function rebuildJsonDotNetObj(obj) { var arr = []; buildRefArray(obj, arr); return setReferences(obj, arr) } function buildRefArray(obj, arr) { if (!obj || obj['$ref']) return; var objId = obj['$id']; if (!objId) { ...


0

You can get JsonOutputFormatter from the BindingContext.OutputFormatters inside of the code of your controller. It allows you dynamically change the SerializerSettings. Try to include using Newtonsoft.Json; in the controller code and to do the following inside of your controller action: var f = BindingContext.OutputFormatters.FirstOrDefault( ...


0

Your entities(models) look just fine. If you are using, or were to use ASP.NET Web API 2, and your client is using the http verb post for example, this setup would work as Web API takes care of the object deserialization: public HttpStatusCode Post(Item item) { Debug.Write(item.toString()); return HttpStatusCode.OK; } If you ...


1

Your Json string is good formatted and the entities are according to Json2Csharp good too. but your problem is with the instruction JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<Users>>(content); all that json that you have is only ONE User, and you are trying to get a list of them, there is the issue, you can try instead with: ...


2

The following is a JSON-object; in your case a User { ... } The following is a JSON-array; in your case an array of User [ { ... }, { ... } ] Thus if you want to deserialize the JSON you got into an array of Users this is not possible because you have no array in JSON. Therefore the right code to deserialize is: ...


1

Given your JSON, you would need a POCO object that contains a items member and a paging member. JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Users>(content); should work.


0

http://json2csharp.com/ I found the above link incredibly helpful as it corrected my C# classes by generating them from the JSON that was actually returned. Then I called : JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<RootObject>(jsonString); and everything worked as expected.


0

One option is to create custom Json result type, as described in this question: Using JSON.NET as the default JSON serializer in ASP.NET MVC 3 - is it possible?. Then you can have bool var on base controller and use it do disable null's when using custom Json result or even pass option directly: return Json(data, ignoreNulls: true);


0

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.registerModule(new JavaTimeModule()); mapper.configure(SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS, false); This works for me


3

If your xml variable is of type XElement, you can try to use it's RemoveAttributes method: var cleanXML = xml; cleanXML.RemoveAttributes(); JsonConvert.SerializeXNode(cleanXML, Newtonsoft.Json.Formatting.None, true);


1

Why do need JsonConvert in order to parse XMLwouldn't it be easier to use parse it as XML ?


0

string s = "[{\"name\":\"Person1\"},{\"name\":\"Person2\"}]"; var Json = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<object>>(s); string[] Jsonn = Json.Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray(); [] Jsonn returns string array instead of object array with JObject formatted. Hope this one help you.


1

delete :: from(::mySubject) your second ng-repeat <data-owl-carousel class="owl-carousel" data-options="{navigation: false, pagination: true, rewindNav : false}"> <div owl-carousel-item="" ng-repeat="item in **mySubject**" class="item"> <p>{{::item}}</p> </div> ...


2

You'll need to deserialize it, and then serialize each object independently. For example (using Newtonsoft.Json): string json = "[{\"name\":\"Person1\"},{\"name\":\"Person2\"}]"; var objects = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<object>>(json); var result = objects.Select(obj => JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj)).ToArray(); Yields (as a ...


0

i am doing the same thing and Its working fine in Latest Version ..Now You Can Serialize and Di-serialize Using Dynamic dynamic state = new JObject(); state.Add("Date", DateTime.Now); state.Sections = new JArray() as dynamic; var _strDJSON = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(state); var _strDDeserialize = ...


-2

Why don't you just use this string s = "[{\"name\":\"Person1\"},{\"name\":\"Person2\"}]"; string[] t = s.Split(','); I tried it. It simply gives you string array as you want it....


0

Previously JSchema was in JSON.NET Library but now its deprecated and they moved it to another library .. You Can Use Json.NET Schema ..It will easily Give You Schema of Any JSON String..even You Can Parse any JSON Using this Lib. ..like Suppose You Have JSON String ie _strJSON JSchema schema = JSchema.Parse(_strJSON);


0

For MVC 6.0.0-rc1-final Edit Startup.cs, In the ConfigureServices(IserviceCollection), modify services.AddMvc(); services.AddMvc(options => { var formatter = new JsonOutputFormatter { SerializerSettings = {ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver()} }; options.OutputFormatters.Insert(0, formatter); });


2

I've solved it. Once I added an empty constructor in my Tile class everything works as intended. public Tile() { } //for deserialization


0

Answering my own question. I've got it to work simply by doing DateTime.Parse on the JObject, then doing ToString to my desired format. Dim temp As String = myRequest("REQ_DATE").ToString Dim tempDateTime As DateTime = DateTime.Parse(temp.ToString) Dim myDesiredResult As String = tempDateTime.ToString("yyyy-MM-ddTHH:mm:ss") I used dbc's ...


2

case #1 and case #3 are the same, as case #3 has no items, null is a valid array - no problem there. The problem is case #2, but this can be solved with JSON.NET custom parsers. I will make the objects simpler, to make the whole code shorter. I am using JSON.NET, because it is everything you need. So here is my BigObject that contains zero, one, or more ...


2

INR is not in the base object, so you are looking for the INR property in a place where it doesn't exist. You would have to go about it in a two step fashion in order to access the property in . Modifiying your code above, it would look something like this: var obj = JObject.Parse(responseText); JObject rates = (JObject)obj["rates"]; string rte = ...


1

You can use the JsonExtensionDataAttribute that JSON.Net provides to put any properties that don't exist on the parent object in to the collection property. Here's an example taken from another SO post. JSON: { "X" : "value", "key1": "value1", "key2": "value2" } C# Data Object: public class Test { public string X { get; set; } ...


2

If you don't have the opportunity to update Json.Net to a newer (e.g. 8.0.2), you can use a Newtonsoft.Json.Linq. Example: open System open Newtonsoft.Json.Linq type Success = { ``odata.context``: string; Value: string; } let json = "{\"@odata.context\":\"OData\",\"Value\":\"token\"}" let p = JObject.Parse(json) {``odata.context`` = ...


1

You can wrap your current object being serialized in another collection so that it will be serialized the way you want: var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(new List<object>() { list }); This should put another "[" and "]" around your current serialized text.


0

Answer to my issue: Thanks to Oleg's response I was able to make it work -- however there were two hurdles. One was the "wrap" folder that was created for Newtonsoft.Json. In the root of my solution was a "wrap" folder that contained a folder called Newtonsoft.Json. Apparently(?) that folder shouldn't have been created (how it was created I have no idea). ...


1

I am not sure why you need your output to be like that. But if you want it that way, you can do something like this. List<List<List<string> > > arrayArrayList = new List<List<List<string>>>(); List<List<string>> arrayList = new List<List<string>>(); List<string> list = ...



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