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16

The System.Windows.Shell namespace is in the PresentationFramework.dll assembly. You can find that out on your own if you search for the namespace, the containing assembly will be displayed in the details.


8

You can do this with the Windows API Code Pack There is a sample in Samples\Shell\TaskbarDemo\CS which shows you how to customise the Jump List and icon.


6

You first need to edit your registry so that your solution file is associated with visual studio directly (i.e. not through the version selector) Article on how to do this. Once you do that then you can pin it to whatever version of VS you have.


6

Check out this link. Good info: http://windowsteamblog.com/blogs/developers/archive/2009/05/18/windows-7-managed-code-apis.aspx


6

Try the following jump-list traversing function. It steps successively from one jump-list location to another (using Ctrl+O or Ctrl+I depending on what values its back and forw arguments have) and stops if the current location is in the same buffer as that buffer it has started from. If it is not possible to find a jump-list location relating to the ...


5

An assembly reference to PresentationFramework is required. The namespace is only available in .NET 4. Use Project + Properties, verify the Target Framework setting. Using it in a Winforms app is fine, the classes don't require the WPF plumbing to work. They are wrappers for the Vista API extensions.


5

I asked the ClickOnce product lead if this was possible, and I regret to tell you that it's not.


4

I think its you who doesnt understand how JumpLists work. "It just lets you open other apps" Is exactly what it does, nothing else. Thats Windows 7 feature, not API Code Pack limitation. Key point to this is fact, that your application is not running, so WHERE it should execute your method? Correct implementation would be to make your JumpList run your ...


4

The Windows Team Blog has some articles about Jump Lists and other new Windows 7 Shell features: Developing for the Windows 7 Taskbar – Jump into Jump Lists – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 Those are geared towards C++ applications, there are also managed code APIs which package those in a way a little easier accessible to .NET developers.


4

%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\AutomaticDestinations There's a file per application inside there. As to how the filenames are mapped to application I don't know.


4

What Kate means by Tasks don't appear to be removable is that literally items that appear in the "Tasks" category cannot be removed. If you would like to remove the ability to pin or unpin items in the JumpList do not supply a CustomCategory. This will cause the items to appear in the "Tasks" category and will be unpinnable and unremovable.


4

From MSDN: An application must be a registered handler for a file type for an item of that type to appear in its Jump List. It does not, however, need to be the default handler for that file type So you must add register yourself with every filetype you care about, either by adding a verb to the ProgId or possibly just adding your ProgId or ...


4

Found the answer I was looking for here: This can be done. open regedit navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Taskband right-click on the empty space in the right-hand pane and create new DWORD value set the name to NumThumbnails double-click the value and set it to the maximum number of ...


3

Your Jump list files are located in %AppData%\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\CustomDestinations and %AppData%\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\AutomaticDestinations. If the files are copied in the folder, the jump list items will appear again. Powershell can, indeed, be used to copy the files to a backup destination and then be copied back when desirable. If you wish ...


3

You are not supposed to do that. Pinning, unpinning, and removing are all supposed to be in the user's control. If you would like to add certain items (like blank starting points, or templates) independent of what the user has opened recently/frequently then I suggest adding a custom category and adding the items to that.


3

I figured one way to do it (if you don't want to mess with the registry), but ultimately I went with the other answer. I had to drag the solution file to the taskbar itself. The OS knows to add VSLauncher to the taskbar and pin it to it. The problem I was having was I was trying to drag it onto the visual studio 2008 application icon I had pinned to the ...


3

The word "natively" is overstating the case a bit. WPF provides jump list support. That's not the same as C# providing it. (For Windows Forms people there's the Code Pack which is a set of managed wrappers.) And MFC provides jump list support which is also not the same as C++ providing it. Anyway, there are two things going on here. One is adding files you ...


3

A SortedDictionary would fill the job. Just use TryGetValue() to conditionally find the list.


3

Maybe you should use Dictionary<int,List<object>> public void Add(int priority,object data) { if(dictionary.ContainsKey(priority)) dictionary[priority].Add(data); else dictionary.Add(priority,new List<object>{data}); }


3

Hm, what's wrong with Dictionary as the underlying container? You get O(1) access/insertion time on average, instead of O(log n) with rb-trees. Just wrap Dictionary according to your needs, for example: internal public class PriorityQueue<TValue> { private Dictionary<int, List<TValue>> mDict; // only Add, TryGetValue shown... ...


3

System.Windows.Application is WPF. Since you are using WinForms you won't have one of these at hand and I suggest you stick to the tried and tested Windows API Code Pack.


2

Yes, using an icon hack is really the only way to accomplish what you are trying to do. For the frequent/MRU lists, you won't even have icons as a option. You can defined the icons for items that are considered custom Tasks. When clicked, it will pass a command line argument to your application, and you will need to read and stored that information. When ...


2

I just tested a JumpList with .NET 4, Windows 7, and ClickOnce. It worked perfectly on the first try.


2

Why does having <TAB> mapped affect <C-I>? The short answer is, "historical reasons", dating from even before the original 'vi'. The ASCII code for <TAB> is 9, same as <CTRL-I>. Since terminals receive their input encoded in ASCII, they can't tell whether that "TAB" signal came from the actual <TAB> key, or from the user ...


2

There is a Java library providing the new Windows 7 features for Java. It's called J7Goodies by Strix Code. You can create your own jump lists with it. Of course it supports "users tasks" too.


2

right click task bar. select properties. The option you are looking for is labeled taskbar buttons (see picture) and has a drop down box to the right of it. The options are: always combine, hide labels combine when taskbar is full never combine


2

Figured it out. IShellItems are just a representation of a file, so they only will provide that file's information (no custom title, etc.) An IShellLink is essentially a shortcut, and is much more flexible in terms of display and actions taken when launched, so are more appropriate in this situation. Here's my new code: void AddRecentApp(const wchar_t* ...


2

That is provided by the system, so you don't need to do anything to add it to your application's Jump List. Even if you don't initialize a custom Jump List for your application, it should always be there in the default Jump List that the system uses. Note that the system seems to be finicky with Jump Lists when running your application in debug mode ...


2

You need to use Microsofts Windows API Code Pack. For an example on the exact way to implement it in your case, this tutorial will guide you through all the steps! The tutorial will show you how to do make the same thing Skype and windows media player use very quickly. Hope this helps!



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