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25

It took me a while, but here is a readable, fully-commented program that changes the vertex size and color in a graph. Enjoy! public class SimpleGraphView { public SimpleGraphView() { // Create a graph with Integer vertices and String edges Graph<Integer, String> g = new SparseGraph<Integer, String>(); for(int i = 0; ...


10

On repo1 : <dependency> <groupId>net.sf.jung</groupId> <artifactId>jung2</artifactId> <version>2.0.1</version> </dependency> Resources : mvnrepository.com - Jung 2


8

I finally found the solution to my problem, using a VisualizationImageServer. Here is an example of how to create an image from a whole JUNG graph, for others struggling with it: import edu.uci.ics.jung.visualization.VisualizationImageServer; ... // Create the VisualizationImageServer // vv is the VisualizationViewer containing my graph ...


7

Code below with generics, so you should replace V and E with String for your Graph<String, String>. Graph<V, E> src; Graph<V, E> dest; for (V v : src.getVertices()) dest.addVertex(v); for (E e : src.getEdges()) dest.addEdge(e, src.getIncidentVertices(e));


6

Thank's, and here is working example: private Transformer<String, Paint> edgePaint = new Transformer<String, Paint>() { public Paint transform(String s) { return Color.RED; } }; private Transformer<String, Stroke> edgeStroke = new Transformer<String, Stroke>() { float dash[] = { 10.0f }; public Stroke ...


6

You need to call a label transformer for your vertex/edge: vv.getRenderContext().setVertexLabelTransformer(new ToStringLabeller()); This is something you'd find pretty often in the samples. It uses the toString() method of your vertex class to specify the label. A slightly more involved example: ...


6

My colleague and I have actually worked with JUNG extensively developing a graph visualization application. I'll be posting a few tutorials on my blog; mainly catering to the GraphML save and load functionalities, and other JUNG aspects not really documented well anywhere. My advice to you would be: Use a good IDE: We used Netbeans and it really took the ...


5

My guess based on the symptoms that you have posted is that your startup command in Eclipse is pointed to the wrong main class. First off, your main method needs to look like this: public static void main(String[] args) { //stuff here } Then you can right-click on the file (either in the editor or in the explorer view) and choose "Run As -> Java ...


5

In JUNG 2.0 it is edu.uci.ics.jung.algorithms.filters.KNeighborhoodFilter: A filter used to extract the k-neighborhood around one or more root node(s). The k-neighborhood is defined as the subgraph induced by the set of vertices that are k or fewer hops (unweighted shortest-path distance) away from the root node. Here's how you'd use it (assuming ...


5

(1) To do this you'd have to hack the rendering code; I don't believe that we support this at the moment. UPDATE: I took a closer look. Actually JUNG does support this without hacking the existing libraries; the easiest way is perhaps to subclass BasicRenderer and then override the render() method so that things happen in the order that you want. (I ...


5

Thanks for the suggestions but I have managed to get FreeHEP Vector Graphics library working the way I want to. I am sharing the code below in case anyone runs into the same questions. The above-named library has a very nice built-in export menu, which handles the export to a bunch of different formats. Code excerpt from the modified ┬┤ModelGraphMouse┬┤ ...


5

For layout of type jung.algorithms.layout.AbstractLayout or any subclass, you can call layout.getX(vertex) and layout.getY(vertex). vertex is your vertex, whatever type you have chosen.


4

This layout works fine for me: http://code.google.com/p/daglayout/ I had to make a modification to the code that I couldn't check in : line 275 should be "continue" instead of "return". Other than that, the algorithm seems to work if you give it enough space for your particular graph. I have a heuristic I use based on total nodes and total tree depth.


4

Download the Stanford Parser zip: Add jars to the build path of your project (include the model files): Use the following snippet to parse sentences and return the constituency trees:(dependency trees can be built by inspecting the structure of the tree) import java.io.StringReader; import java.util.List; import edu.stanford.nlp.ling.CoreLabel; import ...


4

This is nicely explained on http://kahdev.wordpress.com/2010/02/20/detecting-selection-of-vertices-in-jung/ Just add a listener on the PickedVertexState of your VisualizationViewer: Graph<Integer, String> basis = new SparseMultigraph<Integer, String>(); final Layout<Integer, String> layout = new CircleLayout<Integer, String>( ...


4

Since you have defined the generics of SparseMultigraph<V, E> as SparseMultigraph<Integer, String> where the generic V for vertex as Integer and the generic E for edge as String, hence each vertex's label value is in Integer and each edge's label in String. So, if you want each vertex by names like q1, v2, etc., use String for generic V, so you ...


4

You have to Initialize the TreeLayout after adding the Vertexes to the graph, I tried that and it worked for me. You have to do something like the following: (please note that this is a 1 year old code that i had, you might find it to be a little out dated) Layout<GraphVertex, GraphEdge> layout; //create a layout layout = new ...


4

If you want to pin the locations of specific vertices, do the following for each one after creating the Layout and before adding it to the VisualizationViewer/VisualizationImageServer: layout.setLocation(v, location); layout.lock(v, true); http://jung.sourceforge.net/doc/api/edu/uci/ics/jung/algorithms/layout/Layout.html


4

I recently solved this problem by writing my own rendering Layout for JUNG. As base for my derived layout I used the Circle Layout, which is pretty simple. In there you will see that JUNG does a setLocation(Dimension d) for every Vertex, which is pretty much what you are looking for, I guess. Just take a look at the source of the CircleLayout. Then you ...


3

I'm one of the creators and maintainers of JUNG, so bear that in mind for the responses below. First, though, I should say that the author of Prefuse is a friend of a friend (and yes, we've met) and he's done a great job. I am not experienced with Prefuse, but I've seen some beautiful visualizations created with it. Here are the answers to those questions ...


3

There are not so many tutorials around about that framework in addition to the ones you can find through their website. The best way I found to understand the framework has been to browse the examples that you can find inside jung-samples-x.y.z.jar. You can start from them also by copying and then try to adapt a specific example to your need..


3

The method setVertexFillPaintTransformer takes in a transformer that converts a vertice into a colour. So to have different colours for different vertices, you need to make it inspect the vertex. The parameter, i in the method public Paint transform(Integer i) is the vertex, so you can provide a colour that is based on the vertices (or i). For example, if I ...


3

All you need is to add another Transformer that provides the vertex shape when it is selected. The Transformer should choose the shape based on the whether the vertex is "picked" or not. To get the picked state, you need to obtain a PickedState object from the visualization. When the selection is changed, the transformer will be asked for the shape and the ...


3

I had some tasks in which i required all paths from vertex A to B. Here, I took the ShortestPathDemo.java and modified it a bit to call it PathDemo.java. One can find both shortest and full path in a graph. /****************************** PathDemo.java ******************************/ /* * Created on Jan 2, 2004 */ package exasym; import ...


3

You could make MonitorInfo and ThreadInfo implement a common interface. For example, they could both implement Info. Now, you can declare the graph as type Graph<Info, Edges>. Of course, JUNG doesn't come with the functionality to isolate just the MonitorInfo vertices or just the ThreadInfo vertices, but at least it will work with some type safety (as ...


3

Probably the easiest way to solve your problem would be to hack WeakComponentClusterer so that it kept track of the component sizes (or of which one was the largest, since that's what you're interested in) as it was constructing them, and then exposed that information to the user. This is a modification we might make at some point but it's easy enough for ...


3

Check out this similar question. It would be very nice to have a GWT presentation layer for JUNG. The approach we've been taking is to use RaphaelGWT (wrapper for RaphaelJS) for drawing and JUNG for layout on the server side. We tried to port JUNG to the client side (where everything is translated into Javascript) but reliance on concurrent libraries and ...


3

@Rohan: JUNG 2.0 Framework contains both binary and source form of jars. To use the binary jars from JUNG, you need to add them as Referenced Libraries in a project. Create a new project. Then, add required JUNG jars somewhere inside project directory. Refresh project tree. Right-click on each JUNG jar to add it to Build Path > Add to Build Path in ...


3

Have a look at: matplotlib - Here are some graphs made with it. networkx igraph


3

This may not be what you want at all, but you could try JenaJung, which presents a jena model as a Jung graph. From the README file: Model model = FileManager.get().loadModel("http://example.com/data.rdf"); Graph<RDFNode, Statement> g = new JenaJungGraph(model); Layout<RDFNode, Statement> layout = new FRLayout(g); layout.setSize(new ...



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