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4

As stated in the documentation of @BeforeAll: Denotes that the annotated method should be executed before all @Test methods in the current class; analogous to JUnit 4’s @BeforeClass. Such methods must be static and are inherited. The above is true for both Kotlin and Java. Keep in mind that by default Junit will create a separate instance of a test ...


3

Do you have to use Mockito annotations to setup dependencies for the class under test? If that is not the main constraint why not just do the plain simple setup and introduce a constructor or a setter in ServiceIWantToTestImpl class for the ComplicatedDependency field and set the dependency in your test setup directly to whatever impl of ...


3

You are thinking in assertTrue and assertFalse. Those one checks if the parameter is true or false when running a JUnit. Check the API assert in java, as you are using it, it's only taken into consideration when compiling with an special option, not when running the test


2

The test uses two different mock libraries and tries to make them collaborate with each other. But they just don't work in that way. The problem is in this piece of code public void testExpireContract() { Mockito.doNothing().when(c).expireTime(); ... } Object 'c' is not a Mockito mock, it's a PowerMock mock object. That's two different mock ...


2

Coding test code is not different from coding production code. The same good patterns and habits used for production code should be present in testing code. Using static reference as the main approach to structure all your suits seems to me a bad decision. You should check it out Jake Wharton's talk about how to structure your testing code. ...


2

There's an issue with the IntelliJ Platform that causes the tests for the entire class to be executed if you try to run a single test method and have an existing run configuration for the entire class. To run a single method, you need to delete the configuration for the entire class using the Run | Edit Configurations... action.


2

assert is a Java keyword: junit doesn't care about it (and it will only be considered by the JVM if you run with the -ea option). If you want to run a junit test, you should use assertTrue(false); which is a junit method. That will give you a red bar.


2

Debug it and verify that variables have the values you expect. The problem at the moment is one of the variables going out of the bounds of the array. Remember that array indexes go from 0 to length minus one. Both int destinationPit = theBoard[pitChoice] + pitChoice; and int destinationPit = theBoard[pitChoice] + pitChoice; could go out of bounds depending ...


2

Yes, I don't think that there's anything built in to JUnit to let you "nest" @Rule objects like you're doing. I think the most obvious options would be: In your custom @Rule, call the various methods on your child @Rule at the appropriate times. (Essentially, pretend that you are the JUnit library, using the @Rule per its interface.) I haven't dug into ...


2

I guess your problem is that Logger.error() is actually a call to a static method. And "normal" Mokito doesn't allow you to mock calls to static methods. Thus, there are two choices: a) you could turn to PowerMokito ... which enables you to mock such calls; and thereby you can simply specify: "I expect that Logger.error() should be called with this kind ...


2

For a purely JUnit solution, use the ErrorCollector TestRule to handle your asserstions. The ErrorCollector Rule does not report back until the test execution completes. import org.hamcrest.core.IsEqual; import org.hamcrest.core.IsNull; import org.hamcrest.text.IsEmptyString; import org.junit.Rule; import org.junit.Test; import org.junit.rules....


1

getContext() returns a Context pointing to resources from your androidTest/ source set. Use getTargetContext() if the resources are in the actual app itself (e.g., main/ source set).


1

You can find what the classpath is when you run your application by using System.getProperty("java.class.path"); Then, modify "cp" in your ProcessBuilder() statement accordingly.


1

The feature you are looking for is called Soft Assertion, Try assertj SoftAssertions soft = new SoftAssertions(); soft.assertThat(<things>).isEqualTo(<other_thing>); soft.assertAll(); Soft assert will allow execution to next step without throwing exception at failure. At the end assertAll() method with throw all collected error at ...


1

you should add: PowerMockito.mockStatic(DHLUtil.class); and the you can use this method like any other mock: when(DHLUtil.getSizeTypeOfAsset()).thenReturn(whatever);


1

I think you already have the right answer in mind but couldn't follow it or act upon it. The idea you have in mind is this: You cannot use one set of operations for production code and test code. So to speak: you need two independent sets of operations where the one you use for your test code is already proven to work correctly. Independent Sets of ...


1

Apparently, the solution was to add the resolution exclusion to the POM (making the final dependency as follows <dependency> <groupId>com.google.firebase</groupId> <artifactId>firebase-server-sdk</artifactId> <version>[3.0.0,)</version> <exclusions> <exclusion> <...


1

You can achieve this through dataprovider as such, as such your data IS different implementations of the interface. Just so happens instead of actual data, code is your data :). You can look at testng Factory - achieves the same thing but probably you will get the feeling you are looking for - "test different units on the same data set"


1

Here is what I found: SpringJUnit4ClassRunner is not compatible with multithread mode https://jira.spring.io/browse/SPR-12421 I solved it by setting parallel=classes for sunfire <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> ...


1

With this call when(LocalTime.now()).thenReturn(LocalTime.of(15, 0)); you're kind of fitting under: 3: you are stubbing the behaviour of another mock inside before 'thenReturn' instruction if completed. Basically you've mocked statically the LocalTime class but you're also invoking the static LocalTime.of(15, 0) method while defining the behavior of ...


1

The problem is that you call a static method on LocalDate in your when and thenReturn Try something like that: LocalTime time = LocalTime.of(15,0); mockStatic(LocalTime.class); when(LocalTime.now()).thenReturn(time);


1

Keep adding those values to a Set. At the end if Set has more than one value (check the size) then print the values. This means all the values are not same. If the size is 1 then all values are same.


1

There is currently no built-in way to verify an expected Exception with google-truth. You can do one of the following: Use one of the JUnit approaches, such as expected=, as you mentioned Write tests the "ugly" way by surrounding the exercise/act/when portion of your test with a try...catch, as @c0der mentioned, which is what the unit tests for guava do ...


1

Depending on the contents of your collections, you could use either the Arrays.equals(...) or Arrays.deepEquals(...); methods. That way in your unit test you can do one of the following to compare them: assertThat("Custom message for failure.", Arrays.equals(expected.toArray(), actual.toArray()), is(true)); assertThat("Custom message for failure.", Arrays....


1

One way to compare lists is to convert them to arrays and compare those with assertArrayEquals: assertArrayEquals(expected.toArray(), actual.toArray()); To make it work well, your items in your list must provide a correct equals() method.


1

Looking at the API and decompiled signature for the init method which throws the NPE, it shows as final, which basic Mockito.mock() can not handle. On the other hand, the javadoc for PowerMockito.mock() reads: org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito public static T mock(Class type) Creates a mock object that supports mocking of final and ...


1

The latest Idea 2016.2 supports JUnit 5 framework now. You can directly run JUnit5 test without junit-gradle-plugin any more. Please see WHAT'S NEW IN INTELLIJ IDEA. After you upgraded your Idea to this new version, You can create a gradle project and do following steps to test how to run JUnit 5 test. build.gradle apply plugin: 'java' compileTestJava { ...


1

Check what kind of test do you use. InstrumentationRegistry used for Instrumented tests that use emulator or device and they are placed in src/androidTest and use config androidTestCompile. If you use Local unit tests for JVM from folder src/test you should use config testCompile testCompile 'com.android.support.test:runner:0.2' After that you can ...



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