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5

The purpose of unit testing isn't to test statements but methods. The right thing to do is not to consider this line, but to consider the method that it appears in, and ask what you want that method to do: what sort of input does it take, and what sort of output should it produce? Then write tests that take some typical inputs, and check that they give ...


4

Just make the test itself throw the exception: public void testShouldReturnReversedStringOfBar() throws Exception { Bar bar = new Bar(); assertEquals("esnesnon", bar.getReversedString()); } If an exception is thrown then the test will be marked as an error; which is "a failure but not as we know it, Jim" -- that fails anyway. and by the ...


3

I don't know if there's anything equivalent for ScalaTest but in general this is a bad idea. It requires you to keep your test suite class up to date when you add new tests. Both your IDE and your build tool should let you be able to automatically discover and run all tests at once. If you're using maven or gradle, just placing all your tests under the ...


2

The Spock way is thrown. The GroovyTestCase way is shouldFail. You can't use the latter with Spock.


2

Using the built in equals for this kind of test is a bad idea for a couple of reasons: As you can see here, a test failure doesn't give you the diagnostics that you want to actually figure out why the objects are different If you're implementing equals purely for the test, if it changes later on (usually for a business reason) then your test might be ...


2

Multipart has a special format. If the server is expecting a multipart/form-data format, we can't just send it as a normal request. You can look at the preview window in Postman to see the format You can see that each part has a boundary. We don't really have to worry about setting this manually. Resteasy has an API for building multiform output. You ...


2

I'm really not a fan of your test anyway - what are you trying to prove by the error being null? That the list came back with something? Also, are you certain that your service will return the result you want in your test every single time? Don't think of tests in terms of coverage; this will lead to brittle tests and tests that give a false sense of ...


1

You need to verify that the service methods behave as per their contracts even if they are modified in the future. For e.g. The addCategory(Category c) method adds the category. This can be verified by verifying the categoryDao.addCategory() method is called with the category object that has the required properties set. In this case the id should be set to ...


1

You said that getRolesByRoleNameTenant returns a Role You said that the exception occurs on roleList = (List<Role>) roleFunctionService.getRolesByRoleNameTenant(...)); The class cast exception is telling you that you cannot cast a Role to a List<Role>. Basically, either your findRoleByRoleNameTenant method is buggy, or the declaration for ...


1

You don't need to create "stubs for files", you need to create "stub for reading from an InputStream". For read, search, and remove you're using Scanner, which accepts an InputStream as one of its overloaded constructors. If you add an InputStream parameter, you can use that to construct your Scanner. With normal use, you can pass a FileInputStream, while ...


1

Change the last line of your main method to: JUnitCore.runClasses(A.class);


1

I find that this code works as expected. $ ls path/ A.class $ echo $CLASSPATH .:/extra/JUnit/junit-4.12.jar:/extra/JUnit/hamcrest-core-1.3.jar $ java path.A xyz from main: xyz JUnit version 4.12 .xyz Time: 0.003 OK (1 test) Only changes made were package path; import org.junit.runner.JUnitCore; import org.junit.*; The proposed ...


1

assertEquals() calls equals() on your objects, and there is no way around that. What you can do is to implement something like public boolean like(MyClass b) in your class, in which you would compare whatever you want. Then, you could check the result using assertTrue(a.like(b)).


1

You will need to override the equals and for good practise hashCode method for your Class. After that assertEquals(obj expected, obj actual) will not check for reference but will use the logic that you have implemented inequals method.


1

Think about exactly what it is you're trying to achieve. Do you want to test object identity or verify that the two objects have exactly the same data? From your suggestion of assertEquals I am guessing you want to go field-by-field. If the objects are shallow you can use assertThat(actual, samePropertyValuesAs(expected)); This fails when the object is ...


1

Your @PrepareForTest annotation probably isn't being run, since you're using the Robolectric test runner and not the PowerMock runner. The example doesn't show any Android code -- if this really is a standalone test, then switch to the PowerMock runner. If you really do use Android code in the test you'll have to look into how to properly initialize ...


1

You didn't initialize and setup the environment in a way that is suitable for JSP use. It requires a bunch of extra work. You'll need to manipulate classloaders, setup some initializers, declare the javac implementation behavior, and even declare the jsp servlet handling. (missing any one of these and you'll be subject to the environment that you executed ...


1

I would separate cases when mathod should success from those when method should fail. Below sample using catch-exception, zohhak and assertj import static com.googlecode.catchexception.CatchException.caughtException; import static com.googlecode.catchexception.CatchException.verifyException; import static org.assertj.core.api.Assertions.assertThat; import ...


1

You can split your tests in two groups (by specifying the groups property within the @Test annotation) and annotate your initialization method with @BeforeGroups to make it run only once per group. To make your groups execute in a certain order, use dependsOnGroups in your @Test annotation. A more straight-forward approach to achieve the same is to split ...


1

It sounds like a disorganized project structure. Maven prescribes a standard way to segregate your source code, which is something that Gradle respects. One would typically have their source in src/main/java, and their test code in src/test/java, both of which would be followed by the typical package hierarchy. I would encourage you to move your test ...


1

The problem is, that eclipse doesn't understand the difference between test code and production code. As Makoto pointed out usually test code lays in src/main/java and test code in src/test/java. But even when following these conventions eclipse will pickup code from src/test/java when running your app. I see two options for you at the moment: exclude the ...


1

Short answer just don't ! The code that need to be unit tested is the client of the DAO, hence what need to be mocked are the DAOs. DAOs are the component that will integrate the app with an external system (here a database) so they have to be tested as integration tests (i.e. with a real database).



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