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64

Use %d in your PatternLayout. Also %d can take a format pattern as in %d{dd MMM yyyy HH:mm:ss,SSS} you can pick and choose the elements that you want. When the format pattern is omitted the date will be in ISO8601 format.


60

The answer is explained here. To quote: A class is free to implement comparison any way it chooses, and it can choose to make comparison against None mean something (which actually makes sense; if someone told you to implement the None object from scratch, how else would you get it to compare True against itself?). Practically-speaking, ...


48

The best current techniques for distributing your Python files in a jar are detailed in this article on Jython's wiki: http://wiki.python.org/jython/JythonFaq/DistributingJythonScripts For your case, I think you would want to take the jython.jar file that you get when you install Jython and zip the Jython Lib directory into it, then zip your .py files in, ...


37

You can use the -D option to set python.path: jython -Dpython.path=FOO:BAR:BAZ argyle.py


34

You can use psutil (http://code.google.com/p/psutil) which works on Windows and UNIX: import psutil PROCNAME = "python.exe" for proc in psutil.process_iter(): if proc.name() == PROCNAME: print proc The code above on my machines prints: psutil.Process (PID:2908; PPID:3944; NAME:'python.exe'; PATH:'C:\Python26'; CMDL ...


33

I've done pretty extensive development in Ruby and Groovy (as well as a little Jython using Grinder as a load testing tool). Of the 3, I prefer Groovy the most. I like the closure syntax the best and I think that it has the tightest integration in how it works with other java classes on the JVM. It's been a little while since I last used JRuby, but ...


33

You can easily call python functions from Java code with Jython. That is as long as your python code itself runs under jython, i.e. doesn't use some c-extensions that aren't supported. If that works for you, it's certainly the simplest solution you can get. Otherwise you can use org.python.util.PythonInterpreter from the new Java6 interpreter support. A ...


31

A quick example (from http://coreygoldberg.blogspot.com/2008/09/python-vs-java-http-get-request.html) : You have a back end in Java, and you need to perform HTTP GET resquests. Natively : import java.net.*; import java.io.*; public class JGet { public static void main (String[] args) throws IOException { try { URL url = new ...


30

You can add a comment #@UnresolvedImport #@UnusedVariable So your import becomes: import com.work.project.component.client.Interface.ISubInterface as ISubInterface #@UnresolvedImport That should remove the error/warning. There are other comments you can add as well.


28

Java is a much, much more mature platform, with a lot of existing class libraries that could be "dropped in" and used, than, say, Ruby or Python (or even Perl, for that matter). So for people who like using existing code, rather than writing everything themselves, Java is a huge win. For example, recently I've been looking for something like JAXB for Python ...


27

I recently went down this path as well; though it sounds like my application was slightly different. I was interested in approximating set operations on a large number of strings. You do make the key observation that a fast bit vector is required. Depending on what you want to put in your bloom filter, you may also need to give some thought to the speed of ...


25

You can reference exceptions using the sys module. sys.exc_info is a tuple of the type, the instance and the traceback. import sys try: # some call to a java lib that raises an exception here except: instance = sys.exc_info()[1]


23

In this case, they are the same. None is a singleton object (there only ever exists one None). is checks to see if the object is the same object, while == just checks if they are equivalent. For example: p = [1] q = [1] p is q # False because they are not the same actual object p == q # True because they are equivalent But since there is only one None, ...


23

class Foo: def __eq__(self,other): return True foo=Foo() print(foo==None) # True print(foo is None) # False


23

Some Python modules, like lxml, have required components in C. These won't work in Jython. Most Python packages will work fine, and you can install them using the same tools as you use in CPython. This is described in Appendix A of Jython Book: To get setuptools, download ez_setup.py from http://peak.telecommunity.com/dist/ez_setup.py. Then, go to ...


22

Sorry to ressurect the thread, but there was no accepted answer... You could also use Py4J. There is an example on the frontpage and lots of documentation, but essentially, you just call Java methods from your python code as if they were python methods: >>> from py4j.java_gateway import JavaGateway >>> gateway = JavaGateway() ...


22

In reaction to Parand, saying "common practice seems to be using something like SHA1 and split up the bits to form multiple hashes", while that may be true in the sense that it's common practice (PyBloom also uses it), it still doesn't mean it's the right thing to do ;-) For a Bloom filter, the only requirement a hash function has is that its output space ...


22

Jython doesn't compile to "pure java", it compiles to java bytecode - ie, to *.class files. To develop for Android, one further compiles java bytecode to Dalvik bytecode. This means that, yes, Jython can let you use Python for developing Android, subject to you getting it to play nice with the Android SDK (I haven't personally tried this, so I don't know how ...


21

I'm aware of the Jython project, but it looks like this represents a way to use Java and its libraries from within Python, rather than the other way round - am I wrong about this? Yes, you are wrong. You can either use jythonc to compile python code to java .class files or call the python interpreter directly from Java.


20

The header value tells you this: =?gb2312?B?uLGxvmhlbrixsb5nLnhscw==?= "=?" introduces an encoded value "gb2312" denotes the character encoding of the original value "B" denotes that B-encoding (equal to Base64) was used (the alternative is "Q", which refers to something close to quoted-printable) "?" functions as a separator ...


20

The quote you found was indeed a joke, here is a demo of Jython's implementation of the GIL: Jython 2.5.0 (trunk:6550M, Jul 20 2009, 08:40:15) [Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (Apple Inc.)] on java1.5.0_19 Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> from __future__ import GIL File "<stdin>", line 1 SyntaxError: ...


19

Add the hash character # at the end of the line then with the cursor on the flagged error, press Ctrl-1. One of the options in the menu will be something like @UndefinedVariable. Adding this comment will cause PyDev to ignore the error.


19

Just add your jar to sys.path, like this: ~ $ jython Jython 2.5.0+ (trunk:6691, Aug 17 2009, 17:09:38) [Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (Apple Computer, Inc.)] on java1.6.0-dp Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> from org.thobe.somepackage import SomeClass # not possible to import yet Traceback (most recent call ...


19

Jython roadmap is definitely outdated. However, on Frank Wierzbicki's Weblog (one of Jython's main developers) you can get an update, telling that Python 3 is definitely on the radar. Unfortunately, it is not yet clear when, as it is stated in a comment in that same blog: Jython will reach 2.6 and later a 3.x, but it's hard to give a solid time ...


18

Given that you can use all Java classes from within Jython, it is also possible to use SWT. For the example, adapted from an SWT snippet, make sure you have the SWT jar on your CLASSPATH: import org.eclipse.swt as swt import org.eclipse.swt.widgets as widgets import org.eclipse.swt.layout as layout result = None display = widgets.Display() shell = ...


18

No, it does not. It's a part of the VM implementation, not the language. See also: from __future__ import braces


18

To install Jython with super user privileges: sudo java -jar jython_installer-2.5.2.jar Select '/usr/local/lib/jython', then create a symbol link of Jython to /usr/local/bin: sudo ln -s /usr/local/lib/jython/bin/jython /usr/local/bin/


16

Learning Ruby or Python (and Scala to a lesser extent) means you'll have very transferrable skills - you could use the Java version, the native version or the .NET version (IronRuby/IronPython). Groovy is nice but JVM-specific. Being "better prepared for the future" is tricky unless you envisage specific scenarios. What kind of thing do you want to work on? ...


16

As sunqiang pointed out import platform platform.system() works for Jython 2.5, but this doesn't work on Jython 2.2 (the previous Jython release). Also, there has been some discussion about returning more operating system specific details for calls like these in Jython 3.x. Nothing has been decided there, but to be safely backwards and forwards ...


16

So as nobody replied, I investigated a bit more and it seems like my problem might have to do with VirtualBox. Using different server OSes (Debian Squeeze, Ubuntu Server), I had similar problems. For example, with simple static file serving, I got this result from the Apache web server (on Debian): > ab -c50 -n1000 http://ip.of.my.vm/some/static/file.css ...



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