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2

You can access object window.__karma__ which has property files. You can iterate over it. I just entered this code into my test-main.js: for (var file in window.__karma__.files) { console.log(file) } All served files would be printed to console among other messages. Here is sample from my output: ... Firefox 32.0.0 (Ubuntu) LOG: ...


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A common pattern is usually to check whether the exports variable is defined: (function(){ ... var Bar; if (typeof exports !== 'undefined') { Bar = exports; } else { Bar = window.Bar = {}; } })(); This pattern is used in Backbone as example - well, it's technically bit more complicated in the source code because it does support also AMD, ...


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In JavaScript you don't need to escape single quotes in a double quoted string. "'" produces a string with an apostrophe. "\'" is invalid, because \' is an invalid escape sequence. If you want to produce a string with a backslash before an apostrophe you'll need to do "\\'", escaping the backslash.


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This seems like a duplicate of this SO question, where karma is actually installed but the karma-cli package needs to be installed globally as well using npm install -g karma-cli


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You need to let karma access your source files, so they can instantiate your util.main files: [ 'vendor/angular/angular.js', 'vendor/angular-mocks/angular-mocks.js', 'src/**/*spec.js' // add path to your source files here ],


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Normally, the watch is triggered from a digest cycle, either at initialization time or as a result of some event. From tests, you need to run a digest cycle manually after changing something that should affect, or be affected by, the scope: $scope.$digest();


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You have a mismatch in the version of angular and angular-mock . See here: jasmine test fails with undefined is not a function(evaluating $browser.$$checkUrlChange())


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Based on your Karma config, it looks like you are running this from the root level of your project. But your application is in app/, and your templates are relative to that path... that is, you are accessing /views/nav/offline.html, not /app/views/nav/offline.html. Karma doesn't know what to do with this. Try a proxy: proxies = { '/views/': ...


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What makes it not working is the fact that you're spying the $on function. It works fine when not sying it: http://plnkr.co/edit/hNEj7MmDDKJcJ7b298OB?p=info. And the reason is actually simple. When an event is brodcasted, what is called is not the $on() function. What is called is the callback function passed as argument to $on() previously: the listener. ...


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coverageReporter: { reporters: [ { type: 'html', dir: '/' }, { type: 'cobertura', dir: '...' } ] } Should work


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One problem is the line: callback: window.__karma__.start() This calls start right away instead of passing it as callback. This line should have been callback: window.__karma__.start See karma-requirejs README.


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A karma launcher is just a bunch of scripts (in JS, bash or Windows shell) to launch a program - effectively a browser - with some arguments in order to have a clean instance to use. The HTML5 capability is something related to the browser itself and not to the script that is invoking it - as far as I know you cannot invoke a browser with a --no-html5 flag. ...


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For production, yes, you should not publish the /test folder. Tests are for you and your development team, not for your end users.


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Post.cached is an instance of Cache, while your {} is just a boring ol' Object. Jasmine considers having a different constructor a valid reason to fail a toEquals comparison. If you want to check equality as above, you can do something like: var mockCache = new Cache(); expect(Post.cached).toEqual(mockCache); Alternatively, you could just check if it's ...


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The directive A's template URL is /views/partials/directivea.html. This doesn't cause an HTTP GET to be executed because the template is stored in the cache by the preprocessor: ngHtml2JsPreprocessor: { stripPrefix: "app", moduleName: "template-module" } But there is a GET request executed for views/partials/directiveb.html. Note the ...


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The promises resolution in angular is made in the digest cycle, you can trigger this cycle by calling scope.$apply(); in your test. You can read more here.


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There is much to learn about how modules work in Angular, especially under testing with ngMocks. I'll try to be brief. One always begins by calling module (from ngMocks) one (or more times) to build up the module "cookbook" for a test run. In any of these module calls you have an opportunity to access and stash away a previously defined provider. The ...


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.find only searches descendants so the answer will be 0. From http://api.jquery.com/find/ Given a jQuery object that represents a set of DOM elements, the .find() method allows us to search through the descendants of these elements in the DOM tree and construct a new jQuery object from the matching elements. The .find() and .children() methods are ...


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You have myApp variable that is not defined in your spec. Define it: describe("Unit Testing Examples", function () { var myApp; beforeEach(function () { myApp = angular.module('myApp'); }); it('should have a View1Ctrl controller', function () { expect(myApp).toBeDefined(); ...


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I would need to see your test file entirely because I can't follow your question at all. On the one hand, you shouldn't load modules in that way, load them all at the beginning or you will get that injector already created which means that you can't use inject() and after that module(). On the other hand, $rootScope is never going to carry values between ...


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Fixed by adding this to the jshint options in my Gruntfile.coffee: predef: [ "jasmine" "describe" "xdescribe" "before" "beforeEach" "after" "afterEach" "it" "xit" "it" ...



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