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3

You would need to include angular.js as well, then only angular.mocks will work else window.angular will be undefined. files: [ 'dom_munger.data.appjs', 'path/to/angular.js', //<-- include angularjs 'bower_components/angular-mocks/angular-mocks.js', 'tests/spec/*.js' ],


2

There is a couple of things: Use respond instead of response in $httpBackend.expectPOST data argument gets hidden in $http.success handler - rename it to postData. Also pass expected object to success callback. var _postData = function(url, params, data, successFunction /* ... */) { //... $http( { method: 'POST', url: url, ...


2

If I understood the task correctly then here is a working example: angular.module('translateApp', []) .controller('translateCtrl', function ($scope, $translate) { $scope.translate = function(message) { return $translate.translate(message); }; }) .provider({ $translate: function() { this.$get = ...


2

You have two mistakes in your test code. First of all you use wrong module function. The angular.module() function provides a real framework module while simple module() is an alias for angular.mock.module() which you should use in tests. So you ought to write your beforeEach function as follows: beforeEach(module('SSLApp')); Besides, you defined the ...


2

Assuming your mock returns a promise, something like the below one:- var MyHttpMock = jasmine.createSpyObj('MyHttpMock', ['get']); MyHttpMock.get.and.returnValue($q.when({pending:20})); In your test before setting the expectation and after making the specific call you need to manually perform a digest cycle to resolve the promise. it('First test', ...


2

As suggested, by calling window.actionUrl = 'whatever'; Or maybe it'd make sense to invent some structure for mock-objects unit-tests | mocks - | - module1.js ... | - moduleN.js | - globals.js and then put all global objects in globals.js and load it inside karma.config.js


2

This might be a result of some component having a dependency on $state in which case $state will be instantiated and default route will be executed. This is why a template of one of your controllers main.html is being fetched. To bypass this, replace go() and transitionTo() of $state methods with dummies: beforeEach( inject( function ( _$state_ ) { ...


1

To give you cleaner tests that you have more control over the ngMock module extends various core services so they can be inspected and controlled in a synchronous manner. Promise callbacks are executed during the digest loop, which in your testing environment you need to start manually. For example: describe('submitNote Test', function () { it('should ...


1

Instead of setting string green set it on the scope bound when the directive element is compiled in your startup of the test. Otherwise it will look for the value of scope property with the name green on the bound scope, and which of course is not defined in your case. i.e scope.buttonRating = 'green'; and angular.element('<rating-button ...


1

When you fire karma up, what karma does is: It does some pre-process job It creates a webpage where your web assets are loaded (css, js, etc...) It creates a webserver to serve your assets The webserver needs to know where you have your own assets and if you want to serve them straight from the page or load them later. In your karma config file you have ...


1

Here's an alternate solution that doesn't nuke ui-router's transitionTo function. First, the failing scenario can be reproduced by following these steps: npm install yo generator-angular-fullstack; yo angular-fullstack Inject $state service by adding this line to client/app/app.js: angular.module("yoAppName").run(function($state) {}); At this point, ...


1

The coverage plugin preprocess your source code and produces a version of it suitable to track the coverage - that's why all those lines have counters (random-variable++) everywhere in it. Moving the files in another directory not mapped by the coverage plugin leaves your source code as is. If you want to debug your source code while testing disable the ...


1

The 3rd option. Create a separate table. This is a many-to-many relationship, its good be normalized into a separate table just like you described in your 3rd option. You may not need to store positive/negaive sign in that table, just keep the current karma score of a comment in the comment table. For anonymous users... Its hard to keep track on them. I ...


1

I fixed this in Gruntfile.js adding jasmine: true to the options of the jshint task: jshint: { options: { ... node: true, jasmine: true, ... }, ... }, Like the OP, I'm not using a .jshintrc file either.


1

In addition to using the karma runner. You need to add something like the following to your config: files: [ 'bower_components/angular/angular.js', 'bower_components/angular-mocks/angular-mocks.js', 'js/**/*.js', '../../specs/*.js' ], with appropriate list of files. You need to include all specs as well as any files you need loaded for your app, ...


1

You should look into ng-html2js-preprocessor: https://github.com/karma-runner/karma-ng-html2js-preprocessor It will batch up all your templates into a template cache module (that uses $templateCache under the hood) that you can use: describe('SOMETHING', function() { beforeEach(module('templates'));


1

What you are missing is to add the module in the beforeEach hook for test setup. Otherwise the controller will not be found. So add beforeEach(module('myModule')). describe('MainCtrl', function() { var scope, $state, createController; beforeEach(module('myModule')); //<--- Hook module beforeEach(inject(function ($rootScope, $controller) { ...


1

You could try using some headless frameworks like Zombie (http://zombie.labnotes.org/) or PhantomJS (http://phantomjs.org/)


1

You could use to.include or .match: var chai = require("chai"); var expect = chai.expect; var option1 = '/my/url?arg1=value1&arg2=value2'; var option2 = '/my/url?arg2=value2&arg1=value1'; var possible = [option1, option2]; var re = /^\/my\/url\?arg1=value1&arg2=value2|\/my\/url\?arg2=value2&arg1=value1$/; it('1', function () { var ...


1

1) Your test is failing because ui-router-extras is making an unexpected http GET request to app/main/main.html therefore test fails. 2) Actually there are a lot of suggestions in the issue that you linked to. I assume extra call is made to load the template for the default route, ie. otherwise. So overriding it might fix the problem: ...


1

Read your question again: "How to unit test ui-route in angular js" Why would you do that? That behavior you want to test out is already tested in ui-router so you don't need to re-test something that is already tested somewhere else. Focus on what you directive has to provide and test it.


1

This is the reference link that details a solution for your query: http://karma-runner.github.io/0.8/plus/RequireJS.html


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is there any way to "reset" (clear) module in requirejs? You can use requirejs.undef(), but the documentation mention some gotchas. And to my knowledge there is no call you can use to say "unload this module and everything it depends on", which in a complex application is probably what is needed. is there any better approach to run karma ...


1

There are different flavors of BDD. In my opinion the strengths of BDD is to define the requirements collaboratively. Thus, I prefer the name Specification by Example (SbE) instead of Behavior Driven Development (BDD), as it indicates that this technique can be used to ask the right questions and to work out the details together with different stakeholders. ...


1

Any given promise can only be used to return one outcome (be it resolved or rejected), so trying to reject a promise subsequent to resolving it will not work. The simplest way to test your method would be to split your test into two, with one for each outcome: it('should resolve to currency codes on success', function() { scope.findCurrencyCodes(); ...


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Please try enabling 'Toggle Auto-test' button in testing results window toolbar.


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Think of Jasmine suite/spec as your application that is dependent on this module. We do our specs as RequireJS modules that require the appropriate module, instantiate it - sometimes on module level, sometimes on suite (describe) level, sometimes on spec (it) level. At this point, due to you (in it) having an access to an actual instance of the class, you ...


1

Short Answer I believe your issue is that you are using angular.module instead of either just module or angular.mock.module. Long Answer The Angular mock library creates a mock module and inject function. It must do this as the non-mocked version of module and inject must still be able to function normally so you can actually run and test your Angular ...


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I haven't used grunt-karma before, but the easiest option is probably to configure your watch task, so that it runs it's tasks at startup. This can be done via options.atBegin. So if you take the example from the grunt-karma documentation, you would write: watch: { karma: { files: ['app/js/**/*.js', 'test/browser/**/*.js'], tasks: ...



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