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58

With cProfile you can also profile existing programs, without making any separate profiling script. Just run program with profiler python -m cProfile -o profile_data.pyprof script_to_profile.py and open profile data in kcachegrind with pyprof2calltree, whose -k switch automatically opens data in kcachegrind pyprof2calltree -i profile_data.pyprof -k For ...


29

"self" means the time taken by that function, but not from any functions that it calls. If "self" is low and "incl." is high, then the best place to optimise is probably in one of the children (eg. called functions). In this case, it looks like the mysql-query takes most of the time, so you'd probably want to optimise the query (If possible). The reason why ...


16

The calls (of course) happen after each other. The graph splits because each of the top two functions are called by main(). The graph shows calls, not execution order. Yes, that's exactly what it means. main() called Zend_Application->bootstrap twice and ->run once.


15

You could use profilestats.profile decorator ($ pip install profilestats) -- a simple wrapper for pyprof2calltree module (rebranding of lsprofcalltree.py): from profilestats import profile @profile def func(): # do something here Script can be run as usual. profilestats creates two files: cachegrind.out.profilestats and profilestats.prof in ...


13

It is heuristic cycle detection. You can turn it off from toolbar or from menu "View->Detect cycles" or "View->Do cycle detection". Cycle is something like recursion, both direct ( f() -> f() -> f() where -> means call ) and indirect ( f()->g()->f()->g()->f()) Callgring format (used in kcachegrind) is not saving full call stack, it ...


12

Oops... I was calling valgrind --tool=cachegrind instead of valgrind --tool=callgrind.


8

Although @osgx mentions that you can turn off Cycle Detection, I just wanted to point out here that if you feel that <cycle 1> is hiding something of interest to you, that you probably should turn off cycle detection as he explains. As soon as I turned off cycle detection, everything was much more easy to read and locating the bottlenecks in my code ...


7

Self means the time spent in the function excluding any functions it calls. For example: function foo() { bar(); } function bar { sleep(1); } foo(); This would give you: Incl Self Func 1 0 foo 1 0 bar 1 1 sleep <- Here's the bottleneck!


7

You might want to check out WebGrind Webgrind is an Xdebug profiling web frontend in PHP5. It implements a subset of the features of kcachegrind and installs in seconds and works on all platforms.


7

You can get basic information and annotations from callgrind output file (created by valgrind --tool=callgrind) with the command-line utility callgrind_annotate. (manual page section in docs). For files, generated by cachegrind (valgrind --tool=cachegrind), you can use a cg_annotate (section in docs). These utilities are build by default with valgrind ...


6

You can install KCacheGrind using MacPorts: sudo port install valgrind kcachegrind There are also some alternatives like: MacCallGrind (semi-commercial alternative, free version which is limited to 3MB grind files) WebGrind qcachegrind (brew install qcachegrind) XHProf: A Hierarchical Profiler for PHP (pecl install xhprof) See also: do you have ...


5

gprof is actually quite primitive. Here's what it does. 1) It samples the program counter at a constant rate and records how many samples land in each function (exclusive time). 2) It counts how many times any function A calls any function B. From that it can find out how many times each function was called in total, and what it's average exclusive time was. ...


5

Use SSHFS to mount the remote directory that you're working in (see e.g. SSHFS installation instructions for Ubuntu). Then just ssh in and run valgrind --tool=callgrind with whatever options you want in the remote directory. Since you have that directory mounted locally, it's as easy to open the data files with KCacheGrind as if you were debugging locally.


5

If what you're actually trying to do is see what parts of your code could be optimized for speed, and you can randomly pause it in the debugger, this method works. It may be surprising, but you don't need very many stackshots.


5

It can be done using an external module called lscallproftree This article explains how: CherryPy - CacheGrind With my resulting code looking like so: ... if profile: import cProfile import lsprofcalltree profileFileName = 'Profiles/pythonray_' + time.strftime('%Y%m%d_%H%M%S') + '.profile' profile = cProfile.Profile() ...


5

Increasing memory limit is not going to be enough. When importing files like that, you buffer the reading. $f = fopen('yourfile'); while ($data = fread($f, '4096') != 0) { // Do your stuff using the read $data } fclose($f); Update : When working with an ORM, you have to understand that nothing is actually inserted in the database until the flush ...


5

Self = Time spend inside the code of that function itself. Cum. = Time spend in functions Self calls with it's self time (short for Cumulative). Avg vs. Total: Average is average time per call, Total is the total time spend in all calls.


5

Combine all files into one: cat cachegrind.out.* > cachegrind.combined Open the cachegrind.combined and select "Parts" tab on bottom right of the window. You will see multiple parts of profile listed there. Select them all (CTRL+a or use mouse) and you will see summed data of all these profile files.


4

Add this line to your php.ini xdebug.profiler_enable = 1 Then, if you happen to run PHP through a webserver you need to restart the webserver, otherwise the conf change is not picked up. If you are running PHP through cli, then of course no restart is necessary. Now, when you run your PHP script, a cachegrind.out.PID file is created in the directory ...


4

If i remember correctly that should mean (more or less) that function gtk_moz_embed_new() was executing 15.61% of the time the the app was running. You see, that function returns an inline call to other functions (or classes or whatever) that also take time to execute. When they are all done it's then that the function gtk_moz_embed_new() acutally returns a ...


4

For a little while now, I've been using webGrind. http://code.google.com/p/webgrind/ It's fantastic for debugging a server where you don't have easy/fast access to the files, as it is all read/interpreted remotely, then viewed online. The platform independence has been great for me, as I develop on 3 computers and a laptop. As long as I can view a webpage ...


3

Just figured it out... On Ubuntu :- Edit this file : ~/.kde/share/config/kcachegrindrc Change MaxListCount=499 to MaxListCount=2499 or any value you like... make sure your system can support the UI. If the app crashes then reduce that number...


3

Take a look at WebGrind (http://code.google.com/p/webgrind/)


3

Finally that's an XDebug problem with the profile. It looks like Kcachegrind have changed their format, but XDebug have not been updated yet: http://bugs.xdebug.org/view.php?id=639


3

use config directive xdebug.profiler_append instead When this setting is set to 1, profiler files will not be overwritten when a new request would map to the same file (depending on the xdebug.profiler_output_name setting. Instead the file will be appended to with the new profile. (http://xdebug.org/docs/profiler)


3

Have you tried to unroll the loop? I wouldn't worry about L1 misses right now. Also one L2 miss out of 1224 times is ok, the cpu has to load the values into the cache at some point. What percentage of L2 misses does this code cost compared to the rest of the program? Use calloc(), if the array size is always the same and you use constants for the size, ...


3

i am not sure if that is possible in PHP, but can try http://sourceforge.net/projects/precompiledbin/, if you just want to read cachegrind files, KCacheGrind actually works on linux but someone has ported it to run on windows Reference: Windows Callgrind results browser, alternative to KCacheGrind


2

Valgrind/Callgrind doesn't allow this behaviour. Neither kcachegrind does, but I think it will be a good improvement. Maybe some answers could be found on their mailing-list. A working but really boring way could be to use option --separate-thread=no, and update your code to use for each thread a different function name or class name. Depending your code ...


2

gprof's timing data is statistical (read about it in details of profiling docs). On the other hand, KCacheGrind uses valgrind which actually interprets all the code. So KCacheGrind can be "more accurate" (at the expense of more overhead) if the CPU modeled by valgrind is close to your real CPU. Which one to choose also depends on what type of overhead you ...


2

Not necessarily. main is not the "real" entry point of your program, there is lot of stuff going on before and after, for example loading/unloading DLLs and the construction/destruction of globals (those which are dynamically initialized). Those things take time, although normally negligible. Note that there are flags for callgrind that allow to start the ...



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