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4

No, this does not imply that using register keyword in kernel-mode C code is a bad idea: the keyword is only a hint, not an order, to the compiler*. In the end, it is the compiler who picks what storage to use for what variables. When you tell the compiler that you are compiling kernel-mode code by passing an appropriate flag (on Windows that would be ...


3

See: ARM memory.txt and Linux managing less than 1GB . The situation is typical, but not set in stone. The PAGE_OFFSET (0xc0000000) is the start of RAM and the 'ATAGS' are usually placed here. After the atags are copied, the memory is freed for general use; Ie kmalloc() or other allocations.


1

One small mistake though. You have given idxr++ in both as message[idxr++]=buffer[idxr++]. This will increment idxr twice, so you won't get your result even if it doesn't run into an infinite loop. Create a new variable say count=0 and try and return count.


0

Driver code should not sleep while holding a spin lock. In Linux Device Drivers, Third Edition, the "Spinlocks and Atomic Context" section in Chapter 5 states: Therefore, the core rule that applies to spinlocks is that any code must, while holding a spinlock, be atomic. It cannot sleep; in fact, it cannot relinquish the processor for any reason except to ...


0

Finally I corrected complete code. It is very much immature, illogical for few logics still it works the I would like to do it. @Nathan Hutton helped a lot in improving it and making it work. I thank him for that. Though there are many things I still have one major doubt, if you could trace it in kernel logs, an extra line feed character is added every time ...


0

Only in a very backwards way - /proc/cmdline has the current kernel command line which you can parse to get the parameters the kernel was booted with, including isolcpus


0

Looks like it was an unnecessary duplicate inode->i_blksize == (1 << inode->i_blkbits) Check-out this mailing thread


0

I pinpointed where this functionality was added. Only very new versions of the Android branch of the linux kernel have tgid info available, and no vanilla Linux kernel versions (that I'm aware of). If you apply the patch from https://android.googlesource.com/kernel/common/+/d34f20303f234fb6eae16548055766916cae7c2b%5E!/ to the kernel source tree and build, ...


0

Pretty straightforward, 2GB isn't enough RAM. Give at least 4.


0

This U-Boot is a bootloader. So, if you want to properly boot Linux probably you need it. You can look for other bootloader (e.g. barebox). In order to communicate over the serial port, you need some software on the other side that will receive, store and boot your software (Linux kernel in your case) initramfs can be optional. Depends of booting option. ...


2

Though your module would compile with warnings with "-WFrame-larger-than=len", it would still cause the stack overrun and could corrupt the in-core data structures, leading the system to an inconsistency state. The Linux kernel stack size was limited to the 8KiB (in kernel versions earlier before 3.18), and now 16KiB (for the versions later than 3.18). ...


0

finally i found we should find the addreess of scheduler() in system.map then count the number of reading that part of memory but how i can get prmission to access system.map and how i can count the number of reading special part of memory


1

Yes, this happens. Inter-process race conditions are present, and can create weird behavior when IO is buffered. Generally though, input isn't buffered that much (usually only a line at a time) so it isn't that bad. There are ways to get around it though through a function called mmap. In some cases, you want multiple process to communicate so we use ...


1

module_{init,exit}() adds the necessary boilerplate to initialize / cleanup the module and run the entry / exit code, when the module file is loaded / unloaded into or from the kernel space. __init is telling kernel that this function is executed once and never come back mainly for built-in drivers while module_init() is to initialize the module when it is ...


0

There are many ways of fillings data into 'struct timespec', I am just keeping it simple: $ sudo insmod .ko hh=2 mm=50 ss=10 nn=600 /* ========================================================= Execute : sudo insmod <MODULENAME>.ko hh=2 mm=50 ss=10 nn=600 Output : dmesg ========================================================= */ #include ...


-2

Too often, you can hear some telling : C language is synonym of speed and Ada, not. That's not true. Ada adds some checks that slow down execution. That's true but for debugging purpose or safety. They can hence, be deleted by configuration at compile-time. So, you can generate ADa programs without overhead. On the other hand, note that the gnu compiler ...


0

In user space there are couple functions: gettimeofday and settimeofday. May be do_settimeofday ?


1

I just wrote my own module and I suspect that your issue is that the process calling dev_write expects dev_write to return the number of bytes written. If you don't return the correct number (I see you are returning count - 1), dev_write will be called again and again. dev_read I have found to be similar - until it returns 0, the process will repeatedly ...


0

Just set O_DIRECTORY in filp_open flags.


0

The best way I know how is to use: mkdir("your/directory", 0700); David Heffernan's comment shows the specifics. Edit: This page will show you the different mode parameters you can give for your directory and what they do. http://osdir.com/ml/linux.c-programming/2002-06/msg00069.html


0

This email from David Miller answer this question. I tested using another network device driver and it worked very well. The way to test tx_timeout is so simple. If you don't send the packages that are stored in a buffer (or a queue) to the hardware itself. So, those packages will be accumulated until the buffer or queue fill. The next packet may not be ...


1

Yes, all these three tensors can be written as the outer product * of three vectors a*b*c. ker1 = [ 1,1] * [-1,1] * [ 1,1] ker2 = [ 1,1] * [ 1,1] * [-1,1] ker3 = [-1,1] * [ 1,1] * [ 1,1] (This of course is not Matlab syntax. You can think of the first vector as column-vector, the second as row vector and the third as 'top'-vector.)


2

Its standard to use pr_{debug,warn,err}() with [drivername] prefixed. ex: pr_debug("kvm: matched tsc offset for %llu\n", data); Alternatively you can use dev_warn() ex: dev_warn(&adap->dev, "Bus may be unreliable\n"); Is there another way to filter dmesg by driver? Not unless you want to run dmesg -c to clear the logs, before getting ...


1

If I make assumptions about your question, I think you mean the CFS (completely fair scheduler), put in place around 2007-9. It may be easier for you to find the answer to your questions by navigating the code. (http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/kernel/sched/fair.c), that's the fair scheduler, and ...


0

The problem is that Linux has a lot of schedulers: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain_Fuck_Scheduler http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Completely_Fair_Scheduler http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O%281%29_scheduler to name a few.


3

The kmalloc() function returns physically contiguous memory which also is virtually contiguous. Allocating physically contiguous memory has one downside: Due to fragmention it is often hard to find physically contiguous blocks of memory, especially for large allocations. Allocating memory that is only virtually contiguous has a much larger chance of ...


1

man pread on my Linux system says: The file referenced by fd must be capable of seeking. So if a file descriptor is not seekable (e.g. a socket or stdin), you will not be able to pread it.


1

Although the calculation referenced in the question is not used as-is (the kernel uses only integer math with few or no exceptions), the nice syscall is implemented here. After some sanity and security checking, it ultimately calls set_user_nice() which uses macros to convert the user-specified nice value to a kernel priority value. void ...


0

The solution for this problem is that i forgot to add the driver structure in the board file. After adding that i am getting call to the probe


0

Let's say I compile a C program. it's gets translated into bytecode, now what happens to that bytecode, does it immediately run on the processor, or does it get processed by the kernel first and then runs on processor after the kernel has manipulated it and handled the memory allocation & etc.... The kernel is the core of an operating ...


0

Sorry, seriously stupid mistake, that's what happens when rookies do things. I just needed to grant the read and write permissions for my miscellaneous char device driver. sudo chmod a+r+w /dev/MyDevice


1

You should look into the version of the kernel in both cases, check with uname -r. This was initially exported in the earlier versions of the kernel 2.4.x. This initially had "EXPORT_SYMBOL(sys_call_table);" line from linux/kernel/ksyms.c for sys_call_table from being exported properly and later was made static and removed IMU. Now this has been exported ...


0

Since you said that you can run a process as root, then the thing to do is, open the file, then call setuid to change to the unpriv'd user and do everything you need to do. I've done this under BSD, but there's no guarantee that whatever device driver you're messing with isn't going to look at your process' user ID and freak out because it's no longer root.


0

In linux sys_call_table contains function pointers for all system calls. This table was initially exported back in the days of 2.4 , then it was made static , then again it was exported in of some of latest kernels.Lets take example of two cases. Case 1. sys_call_table exported. Use following line in your kernel module. sys_call_table[AVAILABLE_INDEX] = ...


0

Unix provides the stat command or the fstat() function to fetch the last access time of a file. eos$ stat file File: `file' Size: 280486 Blocks: 548 IO Block: 4096 regular file Device: 12h/18d Inode: 1963857568 Links: 1 Access: (0600/-rw-------) Uid: (83991/ vshesha) Gid: ( 108/ abcd) Access: 2014-09-16 15:39:09.000000000 -0400 ...


0

I'm not sure what you can do in your module. If you are working on the shell, you may be able to use the dd command. dd if=/dev/sda of=outfile If you cannot use user-space commands, you may have to work on the disk block device directly. You need to open the device using `open(2)ยด system call (see "man 2 open" for details). int fd; fd = open("/dev/sda", ...


0

Well, you just hinted the solution: in spinlock(), preemption is disabled. so in spin_unlock(), it is reenabled back. Now, problem is you have spin_unlocked on a different variable than before, and immediately upon spin_unlocked, preemption enabled, and normal CPU scheduling will then schedule the kernel threads to another CPU to continue the execution. ...


0

Yes, setrlimit() can do this. Refer to man page and read up on RLIMIT_NPROC The maximum number of processes (or, more precisely on Linux, threads) that > can be created for the real user ID of the calling process. Upon encountering this limit, fork(2) fails with the error EAGAIN. Alternatively, you can set a hard ...


0

This is a feature of a filesystem/OS. In case of Windows and it's default file system NTFS, you need to enable the feature first: http://www.groovypost.com/howto/microsoft/enable-last-access-time-stamp-to-files-folder-windows-7/ In the cmd prompt, Type in "fsutil behavior set disablelastaccess 0" and press enter. Restart your PC for changes to take affect


0

Usually all file systems save the file access time. For example, take a look at NTFS for Windows. Or ext2, and older version of the file system commonly used in linux.


0

I can suggest you something on similar line, but i am not sure if this is what you need: i have developed this on PowerPC. limit your memory that kernel can see (say 2MB less than earlier) i.e. if original memory was 1GB, new memory is 1022MB, with the help of mem=1022M in bootargs now create this structure at 1022MB by ioremap(start address=0x3FE00000 ...


1

It is pretty easy, there is a quick and small tutorial at https://arvindsraj.wordpress.com/2012/10/05/adding-hello-world-system-call-to-linux/


0

I found the solution to the problem. Sometimes Segmentation Faults when inserting the kernel module will occur if the MODULE_LISCENSE is missing. Mine was not exactly missing, however after editing it, it worked and now I do not have Segmentation Fault and my module works fine.


0

I found the answer by clearing the cache memory from the command prompt by the following command. sync; echo 1 /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches Thanks !!!


0

The pread system call is actually calling vfs_read(), so you can use vfs_read() in the kernel space. vfs_read is an exported symbol and you don't need to include any header file.


0

PEM is more or less a wrapper format. It uses header and footers to indicate start and end of base 64 x509 (DER) encoded certificates. So if you can add an X509 certificate it should be very easy to add one that is "PEM encoded". PEM is adding an ASCII armor, i.e. it can be interpreted as text. You can use openssl command line to convert a certificate from ...


0

After a lot of research and messing around with gcc and ld for a few hours, I've solved my problem. I build kernel.c using the following commands: gcc -Wall -pedantic-errors -nostdlib kernel.c -o kernel.exe ld -nostdlib -Ttext 0x1000 -o kernel.tmp kernel_entry.o kernel.exe objcopy -O binary -j .text kernel.tmp kernel.bin I am not entirely sure why this ...


0

When you declare your code and data segments in gdt.asm, you have the following lines. CODE_SEG equ gdt_code - gdt_start -10;-10 so it is withing memory limits DATA_SEG equ gdt_data - gdt_start -10; I have no idea as to why you would think you need to subtract 10 to stay within memory. This step is not necessary, and you should have this: CODE_SEG equ ...


0

It may not be the way you've been thinking, but if you're in the kernel space, then I assume you're writing a kernel extension (kext). With a kernel extension, you can monitor Vnodes for executing applications. You may be able to use the File Scope instead. In conjunction with a user-level application (daemon), the kext notifies the daemon that a process ...


3

You didn't initialize your variable: int offset = 0; Notice that the first use of offset was this: offset += 2*col; which means that either you should have initialized offset to 0, or you should change that line to this: offset = 2*col;



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