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1

Your Applet most likely does not have the input focus.Try adding this.requestFocus () to your init method. Also note that a JApplet is a part of the Swing framework and thus not threadsafe as mentioned in the documentation


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To echo @Thijs Wouters' answer, (a) this is always a great way to figure out what key codes are associated with what keys in Java, and (b), this key code for the context menu, 525, is 20D in hexadecimal, and is defined in Java (since 1.5) as KeyEvent.VK_CONTEXT_MENU for ease of code reading.


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You have to extend OnQueryTextListener, attach the listener and implement onQueryTextSubmit. Example: @Override public boolean onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu) { getMenuInflater().inflate(R.menu.main, menu); searchView = (SearchView) menu.findItem(R.id.mActionSearch).getActionView(); searchView.setOnQueryTextListener(this); return true; } ...


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For ordinary characters you should use the character field of the KeyEvent: if (e.character == '<') The SWT class contains key code constants for things that are not characters. Such as SWT.F1, SWT.ARROW_UP, SWT.HOME.


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Firstly I would not have a subclass implement from you main program. I am not exactly sure what you want to do in your program, but you probably just need to implement a key listener like this : public class Test extends JFrame { static int x = 30; public static void main(String[] args) { final Test frame = new Test(); ...


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Change your code this way: package de.swisslife.muellerj.test; import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.event.KeyEvent; import java.awt.event.KeyListener; import javax.swing.JFrame; public class runpaintgui extends JFrame implements KeyListener{ public runpaintgui(){ this.setSize(1275, 775); this.setResizable(false); ...


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Have a look at this: keyPressed() will keep firing so long as the key is held down. You could put the code into keyReleased() but then it'd probably feel weird to the player if the missile was firing when they let go of the key. Better would be to put some kind of check in place to make sure it only fires once for each event. boolean fired; @Override ...


2

The CGWarpMouseCursorPosition method should do what you want. Apple Docs CGPoint target = CGPointMake(10, 50); // where 10 is x and 50 is y CGWarpMouseCursorPosition(target); When the user presses one of the arrow keys, have this run in a loop until the key is no longer depressed.


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Keep in mind that you DON'T want to use Swing for more advanced games in the future. --- Quick solution: Just remove your while(). The KeyListener interface lets you abstract the concept of "while this key is pressed, do this". Instead, when you implement the interface, you say: "whenever this key is pressed, do this". It's an event. Here's your working ...


2

It never loops because of the break. Effectively you're saying: if keycode is up loop move up break if keycode is up // Will always be true More so, you shouldn't be looping in an event handler like that. Event handlers should execute and return quickly else you'll block the event thread. Should be using a timer to act as a heartbeat and update ...


2

Technically, there isn't one. A ~ is (on most keyboards) represented by the Shift+` key. This is represented by the KeyEvent.VK_BACK_QUOTE virtual key and the InputEvent.SHIFT_DOWN_MASK modifier


2

Put this before including your first Kendo Window directive: $(function () { kendo.ui.Window.fn._keydown = function (originalFn) { var KEY_ESC = 27; return function (e) { if (e.which !== KEY_ESC) { originalFn.call(this, e); } }; }(kendo.ui.Window.fn._keydown); }); (demo)


3

You should never use KeyListeners with text components For one, it doesn't take into account what happens when the user pastes text into the field. It's also possible that the key event could be consumed and never reach your listener Swing has a number of components which might fulfill your needs JSpinner JFormattedTextField Both these are capable of ...


1

If you want the backspace and delete button to function then you need to put them inside your if statement sample: if(c != '1' && c != '2' && c != '3' && c != '4' && c != '5' && c != '6' && c != '7' && c != '8' && c != '9' && c != '0') || !(c == ...


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Try replacing your if (Mile of tests) with: if(c < '0' || c > '9') evt.consume(); or, the more readable, as azurefrog pointed out: if(!Character.isDigit(c)) evt.consume();


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Maybe this goes in the direction you want? var i = 1; $(document).on('keydown', function (e) { if (e.keyCode == 13) { } else if (e.keyCode == 40) { i++; if (i >= 11) i = 1; $('.ful').removeClass("change"); $('.ful_' + i).addClass("change"); $('.scrol').animate({scrollTop:$('.ful_' + i).offset().top},200); ...


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As per the documentation: Creates and returns a copy of this event with the specified event source and target. This means it copies the event handler to a new source and target. A possible use for this is if you wanted a key combination to perform a specific event on two different nodes.


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Your question made me curious :)..so I tried this code,and I was able to repeat this with a few keys.eg. Backpress:when you press this key continuously,the IME starts deleting one word a ta time instead of one letter.similarly,it is possible determine multiple presses of keys which support such action. This again depends on the IME.This would also be useful ...


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You might like to use a QkeyEvent. Are you using Qt4 or Qt5? Have a look at this: http://stackoverflow.com/a/2035547/3751213 It might help. Or, if you are using linux then xte would be great. It is included in xautomation. xte 'key Delete' Look here: http://linux.die.net/man/1/xte


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Isn't TextArea#getCursorPos() what you're looking for? This should do: final TextArea area = new TextArea(); area.addKeyDownHandler(new KeyDownHandler() { @Override public void onKeyDown(KeyDownEvent event) { // Check if ctrl is pressed int position = area.getCursorPos(); if(position > 0) ...



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