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3

The first of the two sites you are referring to here is about 20 years out of date. It does not accurately represent how computers work today. (The second site you're referring to is seriously incorrect on many details; it reads as though the author made up half the article based on guesswork and hearsay.) The keyboard buffer that you're trying to access ...


2

I see one thing wrong wrong so far, and a couple things I would do differently. First, I don't think I would make it open and close the file every time it writes a single character. Second (the wrong wrong), is you call fprintf specifying a string %s and giving it a integer pointer &key. An easy fix should be fprintf(OUTPUT_FILE, "%c", (char)key), ...


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There are many ways to achieve what you want: 1) the simple one use select + read + caching, pseudo code: result = select(); if (result == TIMEOUT) flush_input_queue_to_file(); else (result == DATA_READY) add_event_to_queue(); So you need to add https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_buffer to your code and select before read. Because of you will ...


2

You need to implement HID device emulator on Pi in order to act like keyboard. But it seems impossible because Pi hasn't separate USB port. No, on the Raspberry PI model B the USB hardware is actually connected to a built in Hub, this fixes the USB format as master, there is no way a model B can be a "slave device". Thats said, the SoC of the Raspberry ...


2

Look here for the difference between w and w+. You're overwriting the file every time with the second open for write f=open('C:\Users\Joey\Desktop\output.txt', 'w') I'd imagine your file has just a line break in it. Try opening with just the a option to write to the end of file (EOF) every time. if event.Ascii != 0 or event.Ascii !=8: ...


1

Based in the cross platform requirement you can use something like java or python. (C will require a -almost- complete new program for each platform). Both java and python have good API for access the OS API (which you need for retrieving the scancodes). Here is a python keylogger: https://github.com/ajinabraham/Xenotix-Python-Keylogger and here another ...


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Seems like all I had to do was change the working directory..lol! This Code worked: ProcessStartInfo keylogger = new ProcessStartInfo(@"C:\keylogger.exe"); keylogger.WorkingDirectory = @"C:\"; keylogger.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden; Process.Start(keylogger);


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I don't think Java has native support for something like this. Java is really a language of abstraction, it gets you further away from the OS to make developing easier - but also for security purposes. Key events are core to the OS so you will (likely) need a language or a library has that capability. Check out JNativeHook.


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This can help you out. It basically sets HotKeys for each Number (and Numpad-Number) and calls a Function to save these as well as Timestamps when they were pressed. When you now enter 9 Digits within one Second the Output displays the discovered Barcode. Else the Number-Keystrokes are just sent forth to Windows as usual. #include <Array.au3> #include ...


1

Technically, a port number can be used for anything, but it's likely that port 546 is being used by the service it was assigned to by IANA, the authority in charge of these things. You should find https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_TCP_and_UDP_port_numbers interesting. That list identifies 546 as the IPV6 DHCP Client port, and as Chase Walden ...


1

Following the documentation for GetAsyncKeyState, the type for character is int: SHORT WINAPI GetAsyncKeyState( _In_ int vKey ) You'll note that the return value of GetAsyncKeyState is a short, which is evidently a 16-bit signed integer value. For the return value, If the most significant bit is set, the key is down. Meaning the negative bit on ...


1

I know I am late, but as no answer is accepted yet I wish to share my experience here. I took a project in 2014, where a small part was sending email. After finishing 90% of the job I suddenly got stuck with the ‘email’ part. I searched a lot over the Internet but got no working code. At last, I solved the problem using cURL (also advised by Kerrek SB). You ...


1

Similar Ques Android Key logger well for soft keyboard to appear, you can use EditText yourEditText= (EditText) findViewById(R.id.yourEditText); InputMethodManager imm = (InputMethodManager)getSystemService(Context.INPUT_METHOD_SERVICE); imm.showSoftInput(yourEditText, InputMethodManager.SHOW_IMPLICIT); To close it you can use InputMethodManager imm ...


1

I guess your program does not work with GTK3 windows which uses xinput2. This is true if GTK3 was built without --disable-xinput. AFAIK XSelectInput() won't work with xinput2, you need XISelectEvents() for such windows. Look at meta_core_select_events() function from Mutter sources. It works both for xinput2 and traditional windows. This patch may be ...


1

Initially, your if statement always evaluates to true, it should be: if event.Ascii != 0 or event.Ascii !=8: or, even better: if event.Ascii not in [0, 1]: Also the file open modes might not be what you want, take a look at the docs for a rundown of these.


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You need to use pythoncom.PumpWaitingMessages() which is not blocking. pc.PumpWaitingMessages() That should fix the code from not continuing. PumpWaitingMessages: Pumps all waiting messages for the current thread. PumpMessages: Pumps all messages for the current thread until a WM_QUIT message. Source: Pythoncom documentation


1

You don't call your mail() method anywhere in the code. Which is a good thing, because it would end up in an infinite loop, and you'll probably get blocked by Gmail because you send so many mails. I'd throw a long Thread.Sleep() in there somewhere.


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My suggestion would be to write your own converter taken from the source code of jnativehook. Looking at the code from the link you provided, there is a call to NativeKeyEvent.getKeyText(int keyCode);. So in my opinion the easiest way would be to write something similar or reuse that code, changing the values of keys such as VC_SPACE to return what you ...


1

Not really. Excluding a physical adapter that did keylogging, you won't be able to prevent kernel-space keyloggers completely in any OS. You could introduce some kind of trust between the kernel and applications, but there would be no way to fully prevent spoofing that trust on the application level or some malicious kernel level code (such as a device ...


1

Maybe you could need a library like the following: http://kra.lc/blog/2011/07/java-global-system-hook/ It even tracks keypress events if focus lost of an element.


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Yes, you can use Node.js to write desktop applications which can act as a keylogger, communicate with device drivers and other system resources. Most of the system interoperability has gone into providing cross-platform support for particular system event notifications and I/O. Be mindful that there are tall stacks for reading keyboard events that differ ...



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