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17

Use keyword argument unpacking: >>> kw = {'a': True} >>> f(**kw) <<< 'a was True'


13

def exampleFunction(a, b, c = None): if c is None: c = a ...function body... The default value for the keyword argument can't be a variable (if it is, it's converted to a fixed value when the function is defined.) Commonly used to pass arguments to a main function: def main(argv=None): if argv is None: argv = sys.argv


12

PEP 3102 explains the rationale pretty clearly: the point is to allow functions to accept various "options" that are essentially orthogonal in nature. Specifying these positionally is awkward both on the defining and calling side, since they don't have any obvious "priority" that would translate into a positional order. There are lots of example of ...


11

This general pattern is probably the best and most readable: def exampleFunction(a, b, c = None): if c is None: c = a ... You have to be careful that None is not a valid state for c. If you want to support 'None' values, you can do something like this: def example(a, b, *args, **kwargs): if 'c' in kwargs: c = kwargs['c'] ...


11

Keywords in syntactic patterns are treated the same as literals like numbers etc, so you don't need to specify them as keywords. (That's needed only for identifiers.) So the following works (note that I fixed the typo you had in the second example): #lang racket (define-syntax sum-of-products (syntax-rules () [(sum-of-products ([a b] ...)) (+ ...


11

Groovy does that for you by default (map constructor). You would not need a factory method. Here is an example import groovy.transform.ToString @ToString(includeFields = true, includeNames = true) class Foo{ String name = "Default Name" int age = 25 String address = "Default Address" } println new Foo() println new Foo(name: "John Doe") ...


10

CPython functions that use PyArg_ParseTuple() to parse their arguments do not support keyword arguments (mostly because PyArg_ParseTuple() only supports positional parameters, e.g. a simple sequence). This is explained in the CPython implementation details here: CPython implementation detail: An implementation may provide built-in functions whose ...


9

Keyword arguments are evaluated once at function definition time. So in your first example value() is called exactly once, no matter how often you call the test function. If value() is expensive-ish this explains the difference in runtime between the two versions.


7

I can't think of a more elegant way, either, though it seems to me to that there should be one (like a map-specific variant of apply). Using flatten has problems beyond not being very elegant, though. If the values of your map are collections, flatten will work recursively on those, too, so things could get totally mixed up. This alternative avoids that ...


7

They're called keyword arguments. You can use them without specifying the keyword, so long as you also pass all the arguments before them. The signature of urrlib2.Request is urllib2.Request(url[, data][, headers][, origin_req_host][, unverifiable]) So as long as you specify the url, auth_uri in this case, you should be able to pass authreq_data without ...


6

In Python 2 you can do this using string.Formatter class. >>> class Mapping(object): ... def __getitem__(self, key): ... return 'Proxied: %s' % key ... >>> my_mapping = Mapping() >>> from string import Formatter >>> Formatter().vformat('{Thing1} and {other_thing}', (), my_mapping) 'Proxied: Thing1 and Proxied: ...


6

For a simple function, it's more Pythonic to explicitly define your arguments. Unless you have a legit requirement to accept any number of unknown or variable arguments, the **kwargs method is adding unnecessary complexity. Bonus: Never initialize a list in the function definition! This can have unexpected results by causing it to persist because lists are ...


6

You can use a precondition (http://clojure.org/special_forms#toc9) to assert the key is present: (defn foo [{a :keya b :keyb}] {:pre [(not (nil? b))]} (list a b)) This will throw an AssertionError when the key is nil.


6

For the default parameters, see my comment to your question. For how to call the variadic part with a named argument, see below (scala 2.9.2): scala> case class Foo(a:Int) defined class Foo scala> def f(a:Int, foos: Foo*) = foos.length f: (a: Int, foos: Foo*)Int scala> f(a=2, foos=Foo(2)) res0: Int = 1 // I'm not sure if this is cheating... // ...


6

Whenever you want to do something dynamic that's normally static, Python generally forces you to be explicit about it (because explicit is better than implicit). So, in this case, yes, foo(**{x: 7}) is probably the most pythonic way to write it.


5

t = Test() args = [1,2,3] kwargs= {'a':1,'b':2} t.f1(args,kwargs) t.f1(kwargs) Needs to be t = Test() args = [1,2,3] kwargs= {'a':1,'b':2} t.f1(*args,**kwargs) t.f1(**kwargs) Otherwise it passes args and kwargs as the first and second argument (which both get collapsed to *args inside the function) You had argument unpacking correct, but hadn't added ...


5

Python's functions are objects too, so you can pass them along just like any other object. What you're doing (which can't obviously work) is passing the result of calling the function. What you want is to pass the function and the function's argument: def print_function_name_and_result(func, *args, **kw): print "%s : %s" % (func.__name__, func(*args, ...


5

You can filter the kwargs dictionary based on func_code.co_varnames of a function: def skit(*lines, **kwargs): for line in lines: line(**{key: value for key, value in kwargs.iteritems() if key in line.func_code.co_varnames}) Also see: Can you list the keyword arguments a Python function receives?


5

I would do it like this: def multicolor_message(msgs, colors=None): if colors is None: colors=[libtcod.white for x in len(msgs)]


5

The second parameter for urllib2.Request is data, not header. class urllib2.Request(url[, data][, headers][, origin_req_host][, unverifiable]) To specify headers without specifying data, you should use keyword argument form.


5

The same syntax is used to accept arbitrary keyword arguments. def somestring(**kwargs): return ', '.join('%s=%r' % x for x in kwargs.iteritems()) Note that dicts are arbitrarily ordered, so the resultant string may be in a different order than the arguments passed.


5

Python 3.2+: '{Thing1} and {other_thing}'.format_map(my_mapping)


5

You can use arbitrary argument lists to do this. See http://docs.python.org/tutorial/controlflow.html#arbitrary-argument-lists For example: def somefunc(*args): print args[0], args[1] Calling without keywords: somefunc(10,20) Gives: 10 20 Calling with keywords: somefunc(a=10,b=20) Gives an error: TypeError: someFunc() got an unexpected ...


4

The dictionary you are using as keyword args should be passed in as the kwargs parameter to the Process object. pool = [multiprocessing.Process(target=stretch, args= (shared_arr,slice(i, i+step)),kwargs=args) for i in range (0, y, step)]


4

input() doesn't take any keyword arguments. sep="" is for the print function. Also, don't expect food.append = to do anything, append is a function, you must do food.append(input(...


4

There is also a known (not invented by me at least), function "mapply": (defn mapply [f & args] (apply f (apply concat (butlast args) (last args)))) which can be applied like (mapply your-function {:your "map"}) As to why is this language-specific functionality absent from Clojure core, being implemented more natively and elegantly, no one could ...


4

That's not possible is python, as function's default arguments are executed at function definition time and your msgs variable will not be available until the function is called. From the docs: Default parameter values are evaluated when the function definition is executed. This means that the expression is evaluated once, when the function is ...


4

Nope, there is no better solution. Function argument definitions can be expressions, but they are evaluated only once (which sometimes surprises people, see "Least Astonishment" in Python: The Mutable Default Argument).


4

Ruby 1.9.3 doesn't have named parameters, but added extra sugar for hashes. So {:key => 'val'} is equivalent to {key: 'val'}. What you see there is a hash being passed as parameter. If you look at the source of the method you pointed, you will see this: rb_ary_shuffle(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE ary) { ary = rb_ary_dup(ary); ...



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