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5

GFP = Get Free Pages = __get_free_pages. These flags are flags passed to functions that allocate memory, such as __get_free_pages and kmalloc, telling them what can and can't be done while allocating. For example, GFP_ATOMIC means no context-switch must happen while allocating (which means paging isn't possible).


4

Kernel memory is never freed automatically. This includes kmalloc. All memory related to an open file descriptor should be released when the file is closed. When a process exits, for any reason whatsoever (including kill -9), all open file descriptors are closed, and the driver's close function is called. So if you free there, nothing the process can do ...


3

Make sure q is pointed to a valid area of memory. Then you should be able to assign q->agg_queue_hdr like you had it to begin with.


3

It's clearly not a physical address but a linear or virtual address, and is in 'canonical form' where the value of bit 47 is 'sign extended' up to bit 63.


3

I think the expected way to zero is kzalloc(): https://www.kernel.org/doc/htmldocs/kernel-api/API-kzalloc.html but obviously alloc + memset works too. Update Sample diff from CFQ showing the expected updates: - cfqd = kmalloc_node(sizeof(*cfqd), GFP_KERNEL | __GFP_ZERO, q->node); + cfqd = kzalloc_node(sizeof(*cfqd), GFP_KERNEL, q->node); See ...


3

You're right, kmalloc is returning a virtual address, not a physical one. The memory map you linked to is describing the virtual memory map, not the physical memory map. A virtual address typically is translated to a physical address by the MMU when you access data at the address. What the virtual address translates to depends on the memory map specified by ...


2

The answer to this appears to be that kmalloc doesn't in fact return a physical pointer, but rather a linear pointer, that I must convert to physical with virt_to_phys. Thanks to Alex Brown for providing the answer here.


2

void * kmalloc (size_t size, int flags); kmalloc returns type void * which you are trying to assign to contain is in-correct. Change to, typedef struct { contain *info; // info is a pointer to struct contain } query_arg_t; query_arg_t q; q.info = kmalloc(sizeof(_vector), GFP_KERNEL); Answer to followup question: q.info is a pointer to structure ...


2

Looking at the code you posted, the only possible source for the General Protection Fault I can see is this line: ret = table[hash_index].next; You're not checking the size of table, so perhaps you're accessing out-of-bounds memory? No way to be sure, without knowing how, where and what table is declared as, and how you initialize it. After looking at ...


2

Pay attention to your errors. You're attempting to assign a pointer type to a struct card. You seem to have wanted an array of card*. struct card *deck[52]; Otherwise you don't need dynamic allocation at all; you already have 52 valid card objects.


1

Yes, the pointer can be dereferenced in your code to access the allocated memory. Those functions that return another kind of memory reference do not return void* I think. They usually return unsigned long or typedef'd types.


1

Your structure to be of the form typedef struct { contain *info; } query_arg_t; You are trying to assign a pointer (kmalloc returns void *) to a struct variable (contain).


1

The memset is not putting 0 in front of scull_p_devices. It is overwriting the memory from the address in scull_p_devices up to the size of the allocated region with zeros.


1

Please don't relate your user-space experience with Kernel programming. What do I mean by this? Normal processes get a clean-up for them once they exit, that's not the case with kernel modules because they're not really processes. Technically, when you load a module and then call kmalloc, what you did was that you asked the kernel to allocate some memory ...



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