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27

Dynamic programming is the solution you're looking for. Example with {3,4,10,3,2,5} X-Axis: Reachable sum of group. max = sum(all numbers) / 2 (rounded up) Y-Axis: Count elements in group. max = count numbers / 2 (rounded up) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1 | | | | 4| | | | | | | | | | | // 4 ...


24

The running time is O(NW) for an unbounded knapsack problem with N items and knapsack of size W. W is not polynomial in the length of the input though, which is what makes it pseudo-polynomial. Consider W = 1,000,000,000,000. It only takes 40 bits to represent this number, so input size = 40, but the computational runtime uses the factor 1,000,000,000,000 ...


20

This is a strictness problem. The call to generate in | otherwise = itbl (i + 1) $ V.generate (k + 1) gen does not actually force the vector into memory. You can either import Control.DeepSeq and replace $ by deeply strict application $!!: | otherwise = itbl (i + 1) $!! V.generate (k + 1) gen or you can use an unboxed vector ...


15

I doubt that it will be due to using the same core for all threads. The scheduling is up to the OS, but you should be able to see what's going on if you bring up the performance manager for the OS - it will typically show how busy each core is. Possible reasons for it taking longer: Lots of synchronization (either necessary or unnecessary) The tasks ...


15

Of course this is possible. The only things you need are arrays, integers and a loop construct. E.g., in Scheme, your algorithm can be transcribed using vectors. The main problem is that it becomes hard to read, since knap[k-1][y-1] becomes (vector-ref (vector-ref knap (- k 1)) (- y 1)) and knap[k][y-1] = knap[k-1][y-1]; becomes (vector-set! (vector-ref ...


14

First, your criterion for an unboxed data structure is probably a bit mislead. Unboxed values must be strict, and they have nothing to do with immutability. The solution I'm going to propose is immutable, lazy, and boxed. Also, I'm not sure in what way you are wanting construction and querying to be O(1). The structure I'm proposing is lazily constructed, ...


10

When you initialize w you are using 1-based indexing: for(i=1;i<=n;i++) scanf("%d",&w[i]); But when you access it, you are using 0-based indexing. for(i=0;i<=n;i++) { for(j=0;j<=m;j++) { if(j==0||i==0) v[i][j]=0; if(j-w[i]<0) // This line accesses w[0] when i is 0. Missing an else? ...


9

Unboxed implies strict and bounded. Anything 100% Unboxed cannot be Lazy or Unbounded. The usual compromise is embodied in converting [Word8] to Data.ByteString.Lazy where there are unboxed chunks (strict ByteString) which are linked lazily together in an unbounded way. A much more efficient table generator (enhanced to track individual items) could be ...


8

What did you try? The idea, given the problem you stated (which specifies we must use recursion) is simple: for each item that you can take, see if it's better to take it or not. So there are only two possible path: you take the item you don't take it When you take the item, you remove it from your list and you decrease the capacity by the weight of ...


7

We have 4n elements. Notation: V[k] - value of element k (1 <= k <= 4n) W[k] - weight of element k (1 <= k <= 4n) B - The bound f(k,B) - The value of the optimal solution when the bound is B and you have 4k elements. For the kth element we have five possible choices: Not inserting the kth element to the knapsack. Under that constraint, the ...


7

If you want to use floating point numbers with arbitrary precision (i.e., don't have a fixed number of decimals), and these are not fractions, dynamic programming won't work. The basis of dynamic programming is to store previous results of a calculation for specific inputs. Therefore, if you used floating point numbers with arbitrary precision, you would ...


7

Knapsack can be written as an integer linear programming program. Unlike normal linear programming, this problem requires that variables in the solution are integers. Linear programming is known to be solvable in polynomial time, while integer linear programming is NP-complete. Exercise for the reader: show that 3SAT can be reduced to integer linear ...


7

In the then branch of computeKnapsack the result is a single 3-tuple, but in the else branch it is a list of 3-tuples. I'm going to rewrite computeKnapsack for you. I'll start with your version with the error fixed: computeKnapsack (x:xs) weightLeft = if length (x:xs) <= 1 then [(fst4 x, snd4 x, ((floor (weightLeft / (qud4 x)))*(qud4 x)))] ...


7

you can code it like this: for w = 0 to W //W is the maximum capacity V[0,w] = 0 for i = 1 to n V[i,0] = 0 for i = 1 to n for w = 0 to W if wi <= w // item i can be part of the solution if bi + V[i-1,w-wi] > V[i-1,w] V[i,w] = bi + V[i-1,w- wi] else V[i,w] = V[i-1,w] else V[i,w] = V[i-1,w] // wi > ...


7

When you naively apply a generic memoizer like this, and use continuation passing, the values in your memoization cache are continuations, not regular "final" results. Thus, when you get a cache hit, you aren't getting back a finalized result, you are getting back some function which promises to compute a result when you invoke it. This invocation might be ...


7

Formulation Given: for each cell i = 1, ..., M, the (min) width W_i and (min) height H_i the maximum allowed height of any stack, T We can formulate the mixed integer program as follows: minimize sum { CW_k | k = 1, ..., N } with respect to C_i in { 1, ..., N }, i = 1, ..., M CW_k >= 0, ...


6

I doubt this is possible in CSS since this requires specific computations to rearrange the words optimally. The problem you are actually looking to tackle is the 2 dimensional bin packing problem with bins of equal size and items of variable size. As mentioned in this answer to a question about bin packing, sorting your items from largest to smallest and ...


6

You can reformulate this as the knapsack problem. You have a list of items with total weight M that should be fitted into a bin that can hold maximum weight M/2. The items packed in the bin should weigh as much as possible, but not more than the bin holds. For the case where all weights are non-negative, this problem is only weakly NP-complete and has ...


6

When allocating the arrays for the 2nd dimension you do: for(i=0;i<W+1;i++) A[i]=(int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*(W+1)); It should be n+1 instead of W+1 in the loop. You should iterate over the "items" dimensions and allocate "weight" dimension. The solution will work perfectly for n <= W, but for larger number of items (W < n) - you will get ...


6

From running this code in FSI: open System open System.Diagnostics open System.Collections.Generic let time f = System.GC.Collect() let sw = Stopwatch.StartNew() let r = f() sw.Stop() printfn "Took: %f" sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds r let mutable cacheHits = 0 let mutable cacheMisses = 0 let memoize f = let cache = ...


5

To me it sounds more like some sort of clique problem. The way I see the problem, I'd set up the following graph: Vertices would be the students Two students would be connected by an edge if both of these following things hold: At least one of the two students wants to work with the other one. None of the two students doesn't want to work with the other ...


5

Nice question, it was quite tricky to solve. I can't think of a way to generate the combinations in order either, but I wield the mighty heapq (aka a priority queue) to keep the candidates sorted. from heapq import heappush, heappop import operator def prob(ps): """ returns the probability that *not* all ps are True """ return ...


5

the short answer is yes, Clojure can work directly with java arrays so a direct translation is very straitforward (for [k (range 1 (count a)) y (range 1 b)] (if (< y (aget a (dec k))) (aset knap k (dec y) (aget knap (dec k) (dec y)) (if (> y (aget a (dec k))) (aset knap k (dec y) (max (aget knap (dec k) (dec ...


5

let TOT = w1 + w2 + ... + wn. In this answer I will describe a second bag. I'll denote the original as 'bag' and to the additional as 'knapsack' Fill the bag with all elements, and start excluding elements from it, 'filling' up a new knapsack with size of at most TOT-W, with the highest possible value! You got yourself a regular knapsack problem, with same ...


5

The brute-force idea is easy: Generate all possible subsets of your 20 items, saving only those which satisfy your weight constraint. If you want to be fancy, you can even only consider subsets to which you cannot add anything else without violating the weight constraint, since only these can possibly be the right answer. O(2^n) Find the subset with ...


5

This is a relatively simple binary program. I'd suggest brute force with pruning. If at any time you exceed the allowable weight, you don't need to try combinations of additional items, you can discard the whole tree. Oh wait, you have negative weights? Include all negative weights always, then proceed as above for the positive weights. Or do the ...


5

You will have to do what you said in UPDATE 1: express the budget and item prices in cents (assuming we are talking about dollars). Then we're not talking about arbitrary precision or continuous numbers. Every price (and the budget) will be an integer, it's just that that integer will represent cents. To make things easier let's assume the budget is $10. ...


5

I was having the same problem for a while. I had a CPU-hungry program that I divided in 2 threads (double core CPU), but one beautifull day, while processing some more data, it just stopped using both cores. I just raised the heap mem size (-Xmx1536m in my case), and it worked fine again.


5

This is a version of the Knapsack problem known as the 0-1 knapsack. You are making some silly mistakes in your code. To begin with the first integer in input is the weight and the second is the value. While you are taking first as value and second as weight. Moreover you are taking n+1 values as input 0 to N inclusive. Now in your algorithm, you are ...


5

I had to do this for my homework so I tested all of the above codes (except for the Python one), but none of them work for every corner case. This is my code, it works for every corner case. static int[] values = new int[] {894, 260, 392, 281, 27}; static int[] weights = new int[] {8, 6, 4, 0, 21}; static int W = 30; private static int knapsack(int i, int ...



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