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The JobsToday observable array is outside the view model function. Since you bound the form to the DisplayModel, it can't be bound to. Move the JobsToday inside the function. function DispatchModel(){ self = this; //cache the current context self.JobsToday=ko.observableArray([]); // observable array holds the jobs for the current day Second ...


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There are a few issues here actually. The first is that based on your description of the issue, it sounds like you might want 'setInterval()' and not 'setTimeout()'. The difference is that 'setInterval()' will continuously execute based on a certain interval of time, whereas 'setTimeout()' will only execute once after the time has elapsed. The second issue ...


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Thanks to @kinakuta and @Marin Smit for pointing out the obvious that I failed to understand. I apparently read the difference between setInterval and setTimeout entirely too quickly. The two solutions were adding parenthesis and changing from setTimeout to setInterval


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setTimeout(self.refreshServers, 15000); is running immediately when AppViewModel() is invoked. as you stated, it runs immediately, because it needs function(){} as a parameter to actually be executed after the desired 15 seconds. try this instead: .... setTimeout(function(){ self.refreshServers(); ], 15000); ..... ** be careful here; setInterval is ...


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Functions are end with () so in this case your function might be called refreshServers(). Notice also that you set the timer on 15 seconds, which IMHO is quiet long.


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As a general rule, I always recommend not doing more than one ko.applyBindings, except in special circumstances. In this case; you don't need to separately apply bindings; you can simply make use of your shellViewModel's (nitpick, capitalize your VM constructors) subView property. You can keep your template pretty much the same, but use a with binding so ...


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The issue must have something to do with the JSON result coming from @Html.Raw(Model.ToJson())); Just to play around with the code a little, I created this fiddle which seems to be mapping the data correctly, and successfully binding it to the view: http://jsfiddle.net/4Lu8fdx2/ Here is the JavaScript code: var DynamicModelLoading = function (data) { ...


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You need an observable CartModel defined outside ajax call: CartApp.Cart.CartModel = ko.observable(); in the ajax success you should put new value into this observable: CartApp.Cart.CartModel(ko.wrap.fromJS(response)); CartApp.Cart.CartModel().FilterdData = ... and change your binding in the markup ... foreach: CartApp.Cart.CartModel().FilteredData ...


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Angualar is a framework. Knockout is only a library. (sorry, not sure about Backbone and React) It would be a fairer comparison to compare Angular to Durandal. Durandal much like Angular is a framework. The reason i mention Durandal is that for the model binding it is using Knockout. It also composes the views and has routing capability out of the box. ...


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I suppose that you somewhere should have a list of all possible injuries let say that will be in a parent view model (along to collection of patients) and called AllInjuries also you will need to add some method to your Patient class what will iterate through all patient's injuries and will determine if that patient has that injury, let say it called ...


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I don't know it this can help, but you can dynamicaly update the value of minimumInputLength for a given select2 by updating this internal dict. it is hackish, but it work: $('#id_of_select').data("select2").opts.minimumInputLength = 0 so, it won't be select2 that will compute the value of minimumInputLength, but you can add a change event to you form and ...


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You're evaluating the array with your push: self.businesses().push(newBusiness); Observable Arrays have their own array functions, you should just do this (no parens): self.businesses.push(newBusiness); See this page: http://knockoutjs.com/documentation/observableArrays.html


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CSS :hover selectors indeed work well if you have no dependencies that change with which element is hovered over. But if for example you want to display a text with the index of the element in the list somewhere else, change a template or trigger a function, you still need to bind the event. We can prevent the element to which the event was bound to ...


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I think you might find CSS is easier to make this happen. Here is a JSFiddle that does what I think you want. I've replaced the objects with images to make it work on screen. Obviously layout is broken as we don't have your CSS. http://jsfiddle.net/Quango/010vn1ra/ The method is quite simple: the class to be hidden is defined as display: none by default. ...


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You might be looking for something like this View model: var viewModel = function () { var self = this; self.selectedApp = ko.observable(); self.applications = ko.observableArray([{ "ApplicationName": "application1"},{ "ApplicationName": "application2"},{ "ApplicationName": ...


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The viewModels is a series of nested objects which makes references quite complicated. I can see you're trying to logically structure the data but it makes it difficult to help. Knockout has a context for binding which starts with the bound viewmodel. You can change the context for an element/section using the with binding. Otherwise you have to give ...


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A recursion problem like this I would normally treat as a "code smell". It would strongly suggest that the way you're doing it is possibly the wrong approach. Leaving that aside and assuming the approach is right, a simple way to avoid recursive calls would be to add a flag that stops it happening: http://jsfiddle.net/Quango/ea6cqq5n/ This is a simple ...


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well that was a simple mistake you have done there . you are directly assigning plane array to self.eventschemas instead you need to convert array content to observable's so two way binding will be intact between view and model View Model: self.eventschemas = ko.observableArray(ko.mapping.fromJS(eventschemas)()); You can see i'm using ko.mapping ...


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Wow, this is a lot easier to do in Angular. Thanks for your comments, both useful answers but memesv' answer was what I really needed to know. Changed the backend in the end to provide an array without keys so knockout was then able to interpret they data correctly. Many thanks. Ash


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It's a bit tricky to recommend the best course of action on an abstract example. For example, without knowing what your 'G' data model really looks like, I don't know whether the "go to server and get data" function really has to be on 'G', or whether it could be safely moved into the view model. Assuming that 'G' is the right object, I would split it up ...


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By default, Knockout will allow the click event to continue to bubble up to any higher level event handlers. For example, if your element and a parent of that element are both handling the click event, then the click handler for both elements will be triggered. Since the href its child of sidebar, when you click on the href the 2 click handler will be ...


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What I doing in this cases is this: OnElementUpdate(element, callback){ var timer = setInterval(function(){ if(!$(element).is(':empty')) { clear(timer); callback(); } }, 100); } OnElementUpdate("#myDiv", function(){ //do whatever you want }


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I'd suggest coming at the problem from a different approach. The values come from the language: why create computed fields when you can more tightly couple the language and the values? http://jsfiddle.net/Quango/m80L37y8/ First, I added a values property to each language, that has the text you wanted in an array: self.langSet = [{ langTxt: "English", ...


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You want to bind the value of the dropdown to a view model observable, like selectedApp. Make sure it's defined in your view model like self.selectedApp = ko.observable();. <select data-bind="value: selectedApp, options: $parent.applications, optionsText: 'ApplicationName', optionsCaption: 'Choose an Application'" style="width: 32px" name="Application ...


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Knockout abstracts away manually updating the DOM by using declarative data bindings in your HTML. It also allows you to separate templates and build components. You could just use raw JavaScript to write data into your HTML. The point is to make the application easier to develop and maintain. They are not mutually exclusive, you can use jQuery in a ...


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You should modify your chartType binding handler to make it clear previously created charts before creating new one. Otherwise hovering areas of new charts will interfere with those from old chart. ko.bindingHandlers.chartType = { init: function (element, valueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel, bindingContext) { if (!allBindings.has('chartData')) ...


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First off, you haven't included KnockoutJS in your JSFiddle demo, so your demo will not work anyway. The problem you have is that you're calling tasks.push. tasks itself isn't an array. tasks is a function - a Knockout Observable. In order to push values into it, we need to execute this function by calling tasks().push() instead. As James Thrope has ...


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Your self.selectionSet may be computed too: self.selectionSet = ko.computed(function(){ return [{ theDropTxt: self.i1Txt(), theDropVal: selVal1 }, { theDropTxt: self.i2Txt(), theDropVal: selVal2 }, { theDropTxt: self.i3Txt(), theDropVal: selVal3 }]; }); Is that what you want to get? ...


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Interesting question! I'm gonna go out here and say that you need to do the DOM traversal yourself. There is no Knockout util that does exactly what you want. And even then you'll have to hook deep into KO. This is based on some experience, as well as carefully peering through the KO TypeScript definition (which is a probably a near complete overview of ...


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As the linked question in your now deleted previous question said: Knockout virtual elements not working with Internet Explorer This is a known problem with virtual elements in select tags for <IE 10 One way to work around this would be to have computed properties that you can bind each select to. For example, inside your VM: var self = this; ...


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Try that: <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12" data-bind="foreach: People"> <!-- ko if: $index() % 2 == 0 --> <div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-6" data-bind="text: $parent.People()[$index()]"></div> <div class="col-xs-6" data-bind="text: ...


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It looks like the onclick is never getting called. Check out this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jonr22/w36yuLvr/. All I've done is bind your onclick event so that it actually gets called, and I added a default item to the array so that it can be clicked, like this: ko.components.register("toast-container", { viewModel: ToastViewModel, template: ...


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Considering you're using knockout, why not use the attr binding? <a data-bind="attr:{href:'path/index.php?q='+encodeURIComponent(display())}">click</a> Another option is to provide your own bindingHandler: ko.bindingHandlers.customLink = { init: function(element, valueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel, bindingContext){ var val = ...


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well instead of checking weather something is undefined and If you are in a dilemma always use with (container-less in your scenario) which servers the exact purpose . View : <!-- ko with:$data.User1 --> <p data-bind="text:$data"> defined</p> <!--/ko--> <!-- ko if:$data.User --> <p>Your defined</p> ...


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You need to compare the typeof the value with 'undefined'. For example: <!-- ko if: typeof User().details()[0] !== 'undefined' --> <p>Your defined</p> <!--/ko--> Please see the MDN documentation for this type of check. And a snippet that illustrates this: var x = { y: 50 }; ...


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Check this: ko.components.register("toast-container", { viewModel: ToastViewModel, template: '<div class="array" data-bind="foreach: array1"><div data-bind="text:someText"> </div> </div> <button data-bind="click: Onclick">Click me</button> ' }); function ToastViewModel(params) { var self = ...


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well i hope this is what you looking for i presume . I hope you can intrepet my code and do you bindings View <div> <ul data-bind="foreach: ClassDays"> <li> <input type="checkbox" data-bind="checkedValue:$data, checked:AssignedDates" /> <label data-bind="text: ClassDay"></label> ...


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Ok, I figured it out. It had nothing to do with Knockout. After taking another good look at the rerendered carousel markup, I noticed that no one slide had the class "active", which Bootstrap uses to determine the current slide. After adding this class manually/programmatically like so: var slide = $("#yourselector")[slideIndex]; ...


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The second parameter of a computed() observable is the "owner" of the observable. That is, when the value is computed, it is what will be used as this in the accessor functions. e.g, var a = { foo: 1 }; var b = { foo: 2 }; ko.computed(function () { return this.foo; }, a); // 1 ko.computed(function () { return this.foo; }, b); // 2


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You can do this as follows: $('#delemilter').prepend('<option disabled="disabled">My disabled Option</option>'); Remember to specify other attributes in our option's html as required. Here is a JSFiddle for you: http://jsfiddle.net/loanburger/ask9L71h/


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You can create a computed property of your model that can determine your template. Such as: var model = function(){ var self = this; self.NeedsSpecialTemplate = ko.observable(true); self.SpecialText = ko.observable('Special Text'); self.Template = ko.computed(function(){ if(self.NeedsSpecialTemplate()){ return ...


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Using event.preventDefault() instead of return false does the trick. Change your code to: $(element).unbind('click').bind('click', function(e) { e.preventDefault(); // ... return true; // or just remove the return clause });


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You can try to bind onclick event and make selectedProducts manually. Html: <input type="radio" data-bind="attr: {name: 'room'+room}, click: $root.addSelectedElement" /> Click binding: self.addSelectedElement = function(data) { var productInRoomArr = self.selectedProducts().filter(function(product) { return product.room == data.room; ...


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You can certainly use Regex: here is one which will support leap years as well :) ...


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I think your selectedProducts needs to be an array of observables, rather than an observable array, so that the actual contents are monitored, rather than it's length: this.selectedProducts=[ko.observable(),ko.observable(),ko.observable() ]; Then you can bind the radioboxes as follows: <input type="radio" data-bind=" attr: {name: 'room'+room}, ...


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There are 2 ways to do this a) Pass viewModels as parameters of the child flagRepairAsEdited function: data-bind="value: RepairCost, event: {change: flagRepairAsEdited.bind($data, $parent, $root)}" b) Save the link of the parent viewModel inside child viewModel WorkOrderViewModel = function (data, parent) { this.parent = parent; ... } And use ...


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According to the documentation, the knockout-kendo TreeView should be added to the outer most ul element. Also, instead of using a kendo.data.DataSource, simply add additional nested ul and li elements using standard knockout techniques. Here's a fiddle demonstrating this. UPDATE: Added an add item button. Nodes were added, but without the kendo styles. ...


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I'm not sure you have enough there to use Knockout to do this. Perhaps put a fiddle together? You could achieve this using jQuery however and then let Knockout know things have changed if need be. $('.item').each -> if $(this).hasClass 'buttonClass' // turn $(this) into a button and manipulate in other ways else // ad a class or something that lets ...


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As mentioned in my comment, I'd recommend approaching this from a different way. That said, what you want can be achieved with the use of writable computed observables: var _logMessageValue = ko.observable(); this.currentInfoLogMessage = ko.pureComputed({ read: function () { return this._logMessageValue(); }, write: function (value) { ...


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When you have an observable array with non observable elements, and some properties of one of the elements in the array changes, if you want to refresh only that element, you can use indexOf and splice, like this: var changedIdx = obsArray.indexOf(changedItem); obsArray.splice(changedIdx , 1); // removes the item from the array obsArray.splice(changedIdx , ...



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