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1

You should be setting the title attribute, not data-title


2

Don't do this. <input data-bind="value: InvoiceAddress().StreetName"> Do this: <div data-bind="with: InvoiceAddress"> <input data-bind="value: StreetName"> </div> Compare: ko.applyBindings({ InvoiceAddress: ko.observable({StreetName: "Invoice Street"}), ShippingAddress: ko.observable(null), addShipping: ...


1

Try var ViewModel = { users: ko.observableArray(), getOptions: function() { return { layoutMode: 'vertical', itemSelector: '.user_row' }; }, }; i.e. itemSelector with '.user_row'(with dot)


2

The key is here in the documentation: By default, Knockout assumes that your custom element tag names correspond exactly to the names of components registered using ko.components.register. This convention-over-configuration strategy is ideal for most applications. If you want to have different custom element tag names, you can override ...


1

Its not just the case with knockoutjs or react components, if you are writing xHTML then according to the specification tag names and attributes must be in lower case. (Ref: http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/#h-4.2). In most browsers, although the rendered html will have case insensitive tags (View Source), but the DOM built by browser(debugger tools, inspect ...


0

Probably a good approach would be to bind your displayed dialog to an observableArray and update that observableArray just before displaying the dialog. So <tbody data-bind="foreach: currentDisplayedDialogEmailDtos"> <tr> <td data-bind="text:EmailSubject"></td> <td data-bind="text:CreatedOn"></td> ...


2

Simplest implementation: function Accordion(items, openIndex) { var self = this; self.items = ko.observableArray(items); self.openItem = ko.observable(items[openIndex]); } var items = [ {header: "Item 1", content: "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit."}, {header: "Item 2", content: "Mauris at metus eget ...


0

For one, self isn't defined in Foo.prototype.capitalizer. Once that's fixed, you need to note that the binding click: whatever.capitalizer is using the function, not the method, which is to say, the whatever context is not provided. Instead, vm is provided as the context. This will work: Foo.prototype.capitalizer = function () { ...


1

1) usually to read a observable we use () and we can only perform operations on the unwrapped observable content . As you doing not ! on observable which is like doing NOT on function not on its returned value . so if you want to accomplish this you should first read it later apply NOT operator on it 2) Point 1 answers your point 2 i.e !(True) is valid ...


3

Either you check your checkboxes by object reference (i.e, using $data). Then you will have an array of selected students. Or you check your checkboxes by a value (like the student Id). Then you will have an array of student Ids. In no case you need any click handlers or the value binding, knockout does everything on its own. Take some time to read the ...


1

I noticed two things about your code: First, the selector you're using to instantiate Gridster is on the container div rather than the ul which should contain the li elements representing the widgets. Because of this, the li elements are being created as children of the container div rather than the ul element, which Knockout is reporting back on when ...


1

This is a typical use case for the ko-mapping library. For your case that would work along these lines: // Stub! $ = { getJSON: function(url, callback) { var fakeData = [{"name":"Beer","price":10.99},{"name":"Brats","price":7.99},{"name":"Buns","price":1.49}]; callback(fakeData); } }; // Stub! var mymodel = { products: [] }; ...


1

The fault is just in your initData method. This line is OK: cus.Email = ko.observable();//.extend({ required: true, email: true }); It is this bit that doesn't work: this.Email(data.Email).extend({ required: true, email: true }); You can use extend via the ko.observable function but you cannot then use .extend on the result of setting the observable. ...


0

You haven't provided enough info, but we can safely assume one of two situations: Plain properties: DtCntrctDlvry = 0; or Observables: DtCntrctDlvry = ko.observable(0) Binding handlers don't care which it is if you do simple bindings, e.g.: <span data-bind="text: DtCntrctDlvry"></span> But they do care if you start putting logic in ...


1

You could use a computed observable to calculate the average. function AppViewModel() { var self = this; self.story_rev = ko.observable(); self.animation_rev = ko.observable(); self.sound_rev = ko.observable(); self.characters_rev = ko.observable(); self.enjoyment_rev = ko.observable(); self.averageRating = ...


0

The function that you provide for your view model (or as the createViewModel factory) will receive all of the params. For example: define(['knockout', 'text!./my-tagname.html'], function(ko, templateString) { function MyTagNameComponent(params) { // do something with params here } return { viewModel: MyTagNameComponent, template: ...


1

Use an ajax method to get the json list from server and bind the results in success callback of ajax method. But you should have a list of plans in your root ViewModel, var IssuePlansViewModel = function(data) { var self = this; self.planName = ko.observable(data.planName); self.numberOfParticipants = ko.observable(data.numberOfParticipants); ...


0

If your viewModel in question needs to be an observable itself, then I found that use the mapping to return an observable array as the OP mentioned, and then returning the first item in that array works. This is also useful for return one object in ajax that you then wish to push onto an existing observableArray. I have a helper function for this: ...


3

In a comment you've said: I don't want to show or hide HTML elements, rather I need to execute two different functions loadLayerSource or disableLayer If there's no showing/hiding and it's purely a matter of calling functions, then bind the checkbox to a boolean observable via the checked binding and subscribe to it: var vm = { showing: ...


2

When you check for a value of an empty textbox in Javascript its not null its "" i.e empty string instead. So in your if condition the value is never equal to null, that is the reason the else part is never executed. function QueryLocation() { if ($("#searchloc").val() != "") { var dataObject = { CityTown: ...


0

The second one is the appropriate way to unset your oldSeat Player. Because ko.observable objects are actually functions. oldSeat.Player(null); Reading and writing observables.


0

Use a computed value, e.g. something like: this.templateReady = ko.computed(function() { return yourToggle() && thisRow() && thisTab(); })


2

KO observables are functions and to get their value inside expressions you need to call them without any argument e.g.: $parent.category() So you need to change your code to: <!-- ko if: $parent.category() == "Electronics"--> <div>abc</div> <!--/ko--> In your original code you are comparing the observable function ...


3

There probably isn't (a prominent) one, because it's not common to have a lot of complex logic inside your view. With MVVM-like approaches it works best if you keep the View rather plain, and write out logic in your ViewModel where you can unit test it. So do not do this: var ViewModel = function() { var self = this; self.isCurrent = ...


0

There is only one addToBasketPreviewDisplayed. You're indicating it is a member of your (root) viewmodel. It doesn't matter how many times it appears in the HTML, it's all referencing the same thing, unless this is part of a component, in which case, you want to find the first component. The bottom line is that you should be looking at your viewmodel for how ...


0

After spending until 1AM working on this (another 4 hours after I posted this), and 2 hours this morning, I came up with a nifty work around. In KO if you use a commented if or ifnot statement, the observable is only evaluated when it is within the if or ifnot comment, and even then it seems, only within the if or ifnot comment to which it belongs. The ...


0

Figured out where the issue was. Basically there was a validate behaviour on the Propel schema: <behavior name="validate"> ... <parameter name="rule3" value="{column: enddate, validator: GreaterThan, options: {value: StartDate, message: End date is required}}" /> </behavior> It was passing string "StartDate" instead of an actual value. ...


0

IE doesn't support .files (Can I Use link) You can use for example JQuery to get the file. : $('input[type=file]:eq(0)');


0

The click binding passes the current item to the bound function. var vm = { items: [1, 2, 3], click: function(data) { alert('You clicked: ' + data); } }; ko.applyBindings(vm); <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/knockout/3.2.0/knockout-min.js"></script> <div data-bind="foreach:items"> <button ...


2

You can call the function this way: <button data-bind="click: function() { $parent.teste($data); }">Opcão</button> or <button data-bind="click: function() { $parent.teste($data/* here can be any arguments available in the current binding context */); }">Opcão</button> Update By default the first parameter is being passed to ...


0

If you have multiple dropdowns, you're going to need multiple observables to store the selected value if you want to save individual selections. For example: var CountryModel = function (data) { var self = this; self.id = ko.observable(data.id); self.name = ko.observable(data.name); }; var ViewModel = function (data) { var self ...


0

The code you've posted is not directly related to your problem. What's happening here is that some code wants to use the .concat() method on a variable. .concat() is a prototype of Array, which means that the code in question expects an array. undefined means that, instead of an array, nothing has been passed to the code. This can mean two things: ...


1

It's because the computed is executed when you create it, at which time self.model is not populated. You can use the deferEvaluation option to make it wait until it is accessed, or you can create the computed after the model has been initialized. To use it, you have to specify your function as the read element of the parameter object. NumberTwo: ...


2

In a situation like this, I just make a separate computed that does special validation like that. This computed can be used to enable/disable the ability to submit a form, or what have you. self.atLeastOneFilled = ko.computed(function(){ // note: number will need a different validation if zero is allowed (null check, for example) return self.acc() ...


0

The basic approach to this is that you need to bind the value of the select element to an observable that holds the ID of the course type that should be selected. I've doe a simple fiddle that shows this in action: http://jsfiddle.net/9a1njj1g/2/ The JS is: function CourseArea(types) { this.types = ko.observableArray(types); this.typeid = ...


0

when you say you want to click on the third. I am guessing the third object in the array? I see you're currently using element.all(by.css("[data-bind='text: displayName, visible: displayName']")).get(3).click().click(); however this would click on the 4th object in the array b/c the .get() function takes an index where 0 is the first object in the aray. ...


0

If you want to ignore some properties when mapping, you can use the ignore option. If you want to specify which fields are included, you can preprocess with ko.utils.arrayMap var driverIdList = ko.utils.arrayMap(driverList, function (item) { return item.driverID; }); Then you could use ko.mapping to convert that to observables, or just pass it to an ...


1

I have created a fiddle for you. The computed at the heart of it builds up a structure like the Profiles structure, but only including the matched records. vm.filteredProfiles = ko.computed(function () { var first = vm.search_FirstName().toLocaleLowerCase(); if (first === '') return vm.Profiles(); var result = []; ...


1

ko.applyBindings() is synchronous call, so the next statement should be only executed after its done. If you have knockout components, they can either be loaded synchronously or asynchronously. So, for example var vm = new ViewModel(); ko.applybindings(vm); // CountRenderedElements(); should give you correct result.


2

Because you are directly using your context property as the params of your computed KO will re-render the whole computed when the context changes. The usual practice is to pass in an object with some properties as the params so when the properties of this object changes the component does not completely re-rendered. So you need to change your HTMl to: ...


0

${request.route_url('delete', id=detail['id'])} is python/mako code, not javascript code. If your ID were 99, it should ultimately render to html as delete/99. You are getting the TypeError in python because there is no object/variable in the template namespace called detail. Perhaps this is because you have called it record or something when you passed the ...


2

For wrapping existing bindings, see section 3 here. The gist is that in the init section, you call ko.bindingHandlers.text.init and similarly for update. Around those calls, you can do anything else you like. If the binding you're wrapping doesn't have one of init or update, you'll get an error, and you can just remove that call.


1

Hmm, that's not extending the text binding, you're overwriting it. First things first, note that currently the text binding is extremely simple. Taken from the source: ko.bindingHandlers['text'] = { 'init': function() { // Prevent binding on the dynamically-injected text node (as developers are unlikely to expect that, and it has security ...


1

You're missing the closing pseudo-tag, if what you have isn't working: <!-- ko foreach: months --> <th data-bind="text: month"></th> <!-- /ko --> see http://knockoutjs.com/documentation/foreach-binding.html


4

Just pass the parent to the child explicitly for simplicity sake. function mainViewModel() { this.data = ko.observableArray(); this.filter = new filterViewModel(this); } function filterViewModel(parent) { // do whatever with the parent this.filter = function() { // ajax blablabla } } As comments point out that is introducing ...


2

May be this will be helpful. You can wrap your binding with template binding (and put any another binding(s) inside the template) and pass the 'afterRender' handler. This handler will be called after content will have been rendered. I've beautified the jsfiddle mentioned above (in the comment): var model = { afterRenderCallback: function() { // ...


0

give an id or class name to the td.You can use display:none; or visibility:hidden; . See the example below class .div{ visibility:hidden; //or display:none; } Id #div{ visibility:hidden; //or display:none; }


1

Dynamically: Just binding JSON object. var jsonDataViewModel = {HeroName:'Peter Parker', ContactPhone: '123456', HeroCode: 3}; ko.applyBindings(jsonDataViewModel); http://knockoutjs.com/documentation/observables.html


1

Maybe this: <style> tbody[data-bind="foreach: prayerData"] tr td:not(:first-child) { color: transparent; } </style>


1

You cand use CSS like this: .hidden { visibility: hidden } and than in your html file you need to add this:



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