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6

I did a project on using L-Systems to procedurally generate 3D trees and found the book "The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants" helpful. It's available for free at that link. Not directly related to procedural cities, but very interesting, and a good resource to learn about L-Systems, I think.


5

You can use iterate. I would also suggest a slight modification to your algae function to use pattern matching: data Letter = A | B deriving (Show, Eq) type Alphabet = [Letter] algae :: Alphabet -> Alphabet algae = concatMap f where f A = [A, B] f B = [A] infAlgae :: [Alphabet] infAlgae = iterate algae [A] main :: IO () main = print $ ...


4

The following will pad the rectangular array with spaces: L=: rplc&('A';'AB';'B';'A') L^:(<6) 'A' A AB ABA ABAAB ABAABABA ABAABABAABAAB Or if you don't want padding: L&.>^:(<6) <'A' ┌─┬──┬───┬─────┬────────┬─────────────┐ │A│AB│ABA│ABAAB│ABAABABA│ABAABABAABAAB│ ...


4

I thought you might also be interested in how to efficiently produce an actual infinite list, fibs style: import Data.List (stripPrefix) data Letter = A | B deriving (Show, Eq) type Alphabet = [Letter] algae :: Alphabet -> Alphabet algae = concatMap f where f A = [A, B] f B = [A] infFromPrefix :: Eq a => ([a] -> [a]) -> [a] -> ...


3

newWord is locally scoped inside of createWord(), so after createWord() is finished, newWord disappears. Consider creating newWord in the global scope so you can modify it with createWord - or better yet, let createWord() return a value, and set newWord to that value. I would think that printing "word" and then using it as a parameter in drawit would ...


3

WPF's geometry rendering is just slow. If you want fast, render using another technology, and host the result in WPF. For example, you could render using Direct3D and host your render target inside a D3DImage. Here's an example using Direct2D instead. Or you could draw by manually setting byte values in a RGB buffer and copy that inside a WriteableBitmap. ...


3

You are getting those extra lines because you are using a LINE_STRIP. In your 'F' case, push both end points of your line into the vector (like you were doing originally). _vertexVector.push_back(_prevState.position); _vertexVector.push_back(_currState.position); And when you draw, use LINE_LIST instead.


3

Heres a simple Parsec example to get you going. import Text.ParserCombinators.Parsec data Stream = Chord [Stream] | Play | PitchUp | PitchDown | PitchReset | PanRight | PanLeft | CenterPan deriving Show instructions :: Parser Stream instructions = try chord <|> play <|> up <|> down <|> reset <|> right <|> left <|> ...


3

I'm working on an L-system project too, and it's been tremendously helpful to look at some pre-existing code: lsystem.py - There's also pseudocode in Fundamentals of Natural Computing which I found really helpful. It takes you through the process of using turtle graphics to create a simple L-system tree, and quickly moves on to more advanced stuff.


2

I think the problem lies more in the regularity of features among the trees themselves, rather than their placement per se. A possible solution would be to add mutations. For a global control of "stunted growth", you could suppress say 5% of the production applications. This should give sparser trees that follow the model more loosely. For finer control, ...


2

Vertex shaders is the wrong thing for the situation you're describing. You want to use geometry shaders instead. This requires you to use either Direct3D 10 or OpenGL 3.2 (alternatively OGL2 with a suitable extension) In a geometry shader you feed it with basic geometry data, from which you can emit additional vertices as needed. In your case you'd probably ...


2

Well ... I'll go first and hand you the Wikipedia link, which looks reasonably meaty, and has quite a few external links of its own.


2

A couple of ideas: You never set angle to the new angle (newa) in your ]-handler. Your conditional is wrong according to the comment, newa>0 would turn it left if the angle is positive. Are you sure rt handles negative angles well? You could simplify your code a lot if you use pop instead, and pushed a tuple or somesuch of the state. An index of -1 is ...


2

This is probably problem which is faster to implement from scratch on your own rather for searching and trying to integrate some 3rd party libraries. Implementing L-systems is fairly easy. You need to implement 2 parts. The first part is string-rewriting system. It is simple. You just need to have a dictionary of rewrite rules (char key, string value) and ...


2

Well, for implementing in any language, you have to translate into the terms of the language. One way is to use strings of characters, iterate through and transform the strings directly. This results in a large string for higher iterations. Then iterate through this resulting string and interpret the characters as turtle commands. A variant of the ...


2

Below is a version that uses WritableBitmap as Asik suggested. I used the WriteableBitmapEx extension methods library for the DrawLine method. It is ridiculously fast now. Thanks Asik! using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Text; using System.Windows; using System.Windows.Controls; using System.Windows.Media; using ...


2

L systems are very simple and rely on text substitutions. With this starting information: Axiom : FX Rule : X= +F-F-F+FX Then basically, to produce the next generation of the system you take the previous generation and for each character in it you apply the substitutions. You can use this algorithm to produce a generation: For each character ...


2

Yor code contains an inifinite recursion, as xProductionRule calls itself unconditionally. To draw fractals, you must either constrain the depth of the recursion, or prevent the rendering of parts under a specific size (like 1 pixel). I see that xProductionRule has 5 arguments, one of them is called nLevel, but that argument is not used anywhere, in fact ...


2

From my understanding of an L-system there's a whole grammar that isn't randomly chosen. Could you provide details as to how your grammars work? I would imagine that you can somewhat restrict which directions your trees grow into by making a limited, closed-ended set of productions that go anywhere more than 90 degrees from the starting angle. But then you ...


2

You can use complex values in the left argument of # to expand an array without boxing. For this particular L-system, I'd probably skip the gerunds and use a temporary substitution: to =: 2 : 'n (I.m=y) } y' NB. replace n with m in y ins =: 2 : '(1 j. m=y) #!.n y' NB. insert n after each m in y L =: [: 'c'to'A' [: 'A'ins'B' [: 'B'to'c' ] ...


2

Quick idea. void SudoCreateChild(const mat4x4& m2w_noscale, const int depth) { if(depth>=MAX_DEPTH){ return; } /// Creates the M2W matrix mat4x4 m2w=m2w_noscale * mat4x4::identity*(1/depth); /// Draw the branch DrawCylinder(m2w); /// Create the children branches for(int i=0; i<CHILDREN_NUMBER; ++i){ ...


1

Recursive algorithms for trees/lists are typically written with COND. You figure out what the ending conditions are, and put those first. Then handle atoms, and finally iterate over a list by recursively calling the function on its CAR and CDR, and CONS the results to produce the output list. So the basic template is like: (defun algo (list) (cond ...


1

When you run result = result.replace('Y', 'FX-Y') result = result.replace('X', 'X+YF') the second line replaces the Xs introduced by the first line. (Also, you're using the wrong replacement rules, but you seem to have noticed that already.) You need to carry out these replacements in such a way that they don't interact with each other, probably ...


1

There are two issues in your code. The first is that your code doesn't handle nested brackets properly. The inner opening bracket saves its state over the top of the previous state saved when the outer opening bracket was seen. This won't matter for immediately nested brackets like [[X]+X] (since both have the same starting state), but once you get more ...


1

According to the Wikipedia page, the symbol '[' means to save the current state (angle and positions). The matching ']' means to restore the previously saved position. Because the '[' and ']' can be nested, a stack is needed. from collections import deque ... stack = deque() for chtr in inst: if (chtr == 'F'): tess.forward(25) elif ...


1

Write a function to transform a point given the point, an old origin (the start of the model line segment), a new origin (the start of the child line segment), an angle and a scale (you have already calculated these): var transformPoint = function transformPoint(point, oldOrigin, newOrigin, angle, dist) { // subtract old origin to rotate and scale ...


1

My idea is to make one pass to evaluate sizes of your labyrinth. Let (W: int) be your width variable. When painter moves West you decrement W and when your painter moves East you incerement W. If m1 is maximal possible value of W and m2 is minimal value (maybe, < 0) of W during process then total width of you diagram is padding + linewidth * (m1-m2) For ...


1

You could do some analysis of the L-system to determine its range, and scale appropriately. However, this is not much different than just drawing it with an arbitrary size (say, 1) seeing how big it is, and scaling (once) to fit the screen (not just X/2 until works). For example, if you draw it with scale=1 and it is 40 units in size, and your screen is 400 ...


1

You can get a turtle's current heading by calling turtle.heading(). Likewise, its current position is returned by turtle.position(). Therefore you can use them to save its current state, and then later use those values to restore it. Here's a trivial example to illustrate what I mean: from turtle import * def get_turtle_state(turtle): return ...


1

There are only two two ways I can think of that would cause such a problem. The first is that you have a memory corruption somewhere in your program, which is possibly but we should only consider after eliminating our other options. The second option is that the stack is, in fact, empty. Your screenshot doesn't show us the internal size of the stack, it ...



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