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419

The horizontal bar means that "[above] implies [below]". If there are multiple expressions in [above], then consider them anded together; all of the [above] must be true in order to guarantee the [below]. : means has type ∈ means is in. (Likewise ∉ means "is not in".) Γ is usually used to refer to an environment or context; in this case it can be thought of ...


246

This syntax, while it may look complicated, is actually fairly simple. The basic idea comes from logic: the whole expression is an implication with the top half being the assumptions and the bottom half being the result. That is, if you know that the top expressions are true, you can conclude that the bottom expressions are true as well. Symbols Another ...


55

The benefit of lambda calculus is that it's an extremely simple model of computation that is equivalent to a Turing machine. But while a Turing machine is more like assembly language, lambda calculus is more a like a high-level language. And if you learn Church encodings that will help you learn the programming technique called continuation-passing style, ...


50

if somebody could at least tell me where to start looking to comprehend what this sea of symbols means See "Practical Foundations of Programming Languages.", chapters 2 and 3, on the style of logic through judgements and derivations. The entire book is now available on Amazon. Chapter 2 Inductive Definitions Inductive definitions are an indispensable ...


32

The notation comes from natural deduction. ⊢ symbol is called turnstile. The 6 rules are very easy. Var rule is rather trivial rule - it says that if type for identifier is already present in your type environment, then to infer the type you just take it from the environment as is. App rule says that if you have two identifiers e0 and e1 and can infer ...


28

All lambda calculus data structures are, well, functions, because that's all there is in the lambda calculus. That means that the representation for a boolean, tuple, list, number, or anything, has to be some function that represents the active behavior of that thing. For lists, it is a "fold". Immutable singly-linked lists are usually defined List a = Cons ...


28

I imagine SO is not a good place to be explaining the entire Milner Hindley algorithm. If you are looking for a good explanation of the algorithm, the best that I've found so far is in chapter 30 of Shriram Krinshnamurthi's Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation (CC licensed!). Here's one good reason why it's a good explanation: ...


24

Here's an example: \f -> f x In this lambda, x is a free variable. Basically a free variable is a variable used in a lambda that is not one of the lambda's arguments (or a let variable). It comes from outside the context of the lambda. Eta reduction means we can change: (\x -> g x) to (g) But only if x is not free (i.e. it is not used or is an ...


23

The problem is that predChurch is too polymorphic to be correctly inferred by Hindley-Milner type inference. For example, it is tempting to write: predChurch :: Church a -> Church a predChurch = \n -> \f -> \x -> n (\g -> \h -> h (g f)) (\u -> x) (\u -> u) but this type is not correct. A Church a takes as its first argument an a ...


23

Lisp is a dynamically typed language, would that roughly correspond to untyped lambda calculus? Yes, but only roughly. In the "pure" untyped lambda calculus, everything is coded as functions. (You can google for the popular "Church encoding" and the less popular "Scott encoding".) Lisp has non-functional data, like atoms and numbers and such, so this ...


23

In a word, general recursion. Haskell allows for arbitrary recursion while System F has no form of recursion. The lack of infinite types means fix isn't expressible as a closed term. There is no primitive notion of names and recursion. In fact, pure System F has no notion of any such thing as definitions! So in Haskell this single definition is what adds ...


21

A normal function applied to an argument, like the following: (\x y -> x + 1 : y) 1 Can be reduced, to give: \y -> 1 + 1 : y In the first expression, the "outermost" thing was an application, so it was not in WHNF. In the second, the outermost thing is a lambda abstraction, so it is in WHNF (even though we could do more reductions inside the ...


20

If you want to program in any functional programming language, it's essential. I mean, how useful is it to know about Turing machines? Well, if you write C, the language paradigm is quite close to Turing machines -- you have an instruction pointer and a current instruction, and the machine takes some action in the current state, and then ambles along to ...


20

If you are done with the Wikipedia entry, follow its link to the online Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, do the assignments, or read the book.


18

Where am I going wrong? Nowhere! You're done. Remember, the variable names aren't important; it's the structure that is important. The names f or x2 aren't meaningful. It only matters how they are used. The Church numeral for 1 is λf. λx. f x and you have λx2. (λx1. x2 x1) Rename x2 to f and x1 to x and voilà! You have λf. (λx. f x) = λf. λx. f ...


18

Your definitions are correct, as are their types, when seen at top-level. The problem is that, in the second example, you're using n in two different ways that don't have the same type--or rather, their types can't be unified, and attempting to do so would produce an infinite type. Similar uses of one work correctly because each use is independently ...


17

It is clear that Set : Set would cause a contradiction, such as Russell's paradox. Now consider () -> Set where () is a unit type. This is clearly isomorphic to Set. So if () -> Set : Set then also Set : Set. In fact, if for any inhabited A we had A -> Set : Set then we could wrap Set into A -> Set using a constant function: wrap1 : {A : Set} ...


17

It's a default implementation for the method. Unless your instance declaration contains an explicit implementation of (>>), that's the definition that will be used. Default methods are widespread if some method can be implemented using another method, but potentially there can be more efficient implementations for some datatypes. m >>= \_ -> ...


16

First, kinds and polymorphic types are different things. You can have a HM type system where all types are of the same kind (*), you could also have a system without polymorphism but with complex kinds. If a term M is of type ∀a.t, it means that for whatever type s we can substitute s for a in t (often written as t[a:=s] and we'll have that M is of type ...


15

Church encoding of a recursive data type is precisely its fold (catamorphism). Before we venture into the messy and not-very-readable world of Church encoded data types, we'll implement these two functions on the representation given in the previous answer. And because we'd like to transfer then easily to the Church encoded variants, we'll have to do both ...


15

Normally, the specific variable names that we chose in the lambda calculus are meaningless - a function of x is the same thing as a function of a or b or c. In other words: (λx.(λy.yx)) is equivalent to (λa.(λb.ba)) - renaming x to a and y to b does not change anything. From this, you might conclude that any substitution is allowed - i.e. any variable in ...


15

Ok, so the idea of Church numerals is to encode "data" using functions, right? The way that works is by representing a value by some generic operation you'd perform with it. We can therefore go in the other direction as well, which can sometimes make things clearer. Church numerals are a unary representation of the natural numbers. So, let's use Z to mean ...


14

It's possible to represent pretty much any type you want. But since monadic operations are implemented differently for every type, it is not possible to write >>= once and have it work for every instance. However, you can write generic functions that depend on evidence of the instance of the typeclass. Consider e here to be a tuple, where fst e ...


14

Doing this for a "list" is tricky using Haskell's type system, but can be done. As a starting point, it's easy enough if you restrict yourself to binary products and sums (and personally, I'd just stick with this): {-# LANGUAGE GADTs, DataKinds, TypeOperators, KindSignatures, TypeFamilies #-} import Prelude hiding (sum) -- for later -- * Universe of ...


13

You are mixing up the type level with the value level. In untyped lambda calculus there are no monads. There can be monadic operations (value level), but not monads (type level). The operations themselves can be the same, though, so you don't lose any expressive power. So the question itself doesn't really make sense.


13

It's okay to think about that theoretically, but... Just like in Ruby not everything is an object (argument lists, for instance, are not objects), not everything in Haskell is a function. For more reference, check out this neat post: http://conal.net/blog/posts/everything-is-a-function-in-haskell


13

@wrhall gives a good answer. However you are somewhat correct that in the pure lambda calculus it is consistent for everything to be a function, and the language is Turing-complete (capable of expressing any pure computation that Haskell, etc. is). That gives you some very strange things, since the only thing you can do to anything is to apply it to ...


13

Because in Ruby, methods are not lambdas (like, for example, in JavaScript). Methods always belong to objects, can be inherited (by sub-classing or mixins), can be overwritten in an object's eigenclass and can be given a block (which is a lambda). They have their own scope for variables. Example method definition: a = :some_variable def some_method # do ...


13

Eta reduction is turning \x -> f x into f as long as f doesn't have a free occurence of x. To check that they're the same, apply them to some value y: (\x -> f x) y === f' y -- (where f' is obtained from f by substituting all x's by y) === f y -- since f has no free occurrences of x Your definition of haqify is seen as \s -> ...


13

To compare it to C, the current continuation is like the current state of the stack. It has all the functions waiting for the result of the current function to finish so they can resume execution. The variable captured as the current continuation is used like a function, except that it takes the provided value and returns it to the waiting stack. This ...



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