Hot answers tagged

1055

In Python 2.6 and earlier, the dict constructor can receive an iterable of key/value pairs: d = dict((key, value) for (key, value) in iterable) From Python 2.7 and 3 onwards, you can just use the dict comprehension syntax directly: d = {key: value for (key, value) in iterable} Of course, you can use the iterable in any way you want (tuples and lists ...


1052

Yes you can use the GetValues method var values = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Foos)); Or the typed version var values = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Foos)).Cast<Foos>(); I long ago added a helper function to my private library for just such an occasion public static class EnumUtil { public static IEnumerable<T> GetValues<T>() { return Enum....


500

Cannibalized from another post of mine, here's more than you ever wanted to know about this. Before I start, here's the most important thing to keep in mind about Javascript, and to repeat to yourself when it doesn't make sense. Javascript does not have classes (ES6 class is syntactic sugar). If something looks like a class, it's a clever trick. Javascript ...


486

Another use occurred to me today, so I searched the web excitedly and found an existing mention of it: Defining Variables inside Block Scope. Background JavaScript, in spite of its superficial resemblance to C and C++, does not scope variables to the block they are defined in: var name = "Joe"; if ( true ) { var name = "Jack"; } // name now contains "...


430

Expression: Something which evaluates to a value. Example: 1+2/x Statement: A line of code which does something. Example: GOTO 100 In the earliest general-purpose programming languages, like FORTRAN, the distinction was crystal-clear. In FORTRAN, a statement was one unit of execution, a thing that you did. The only reason it wasn't called a "line" was ...


356

foreach(Foos foo in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Foos)))


341

static members belong to the class instead of a specific instance. It means that only one instance of a static field exists[1] even if you create a million instances of the class or you don't create any. It will be shared by all instances. Since static methods also do not belong to a specific instance, they can't refer to instance members (how would you ...


244

Using a protocol-independent absolute path: <img src="//domain.com/img/logo.png"/> If the browser is viewing an page in SSL through HTTPS, then it'll request that asset with the https protocol, otherwise it'll request it with HTTP. This prevents that awful "This Page Contains Both Secure and Non-Secure Items" error message in IE, keeping all your ...


238

Well, the API for Integer.valueOf(String) does indeed say that the String is interpreted exactly as if it were given to Integer.parseInt(String). However, valueOf(String) returns a new Integer() object whereas parseInt(String) returns a primitive int. If you want to enjoy the potential caching benefits of Integer.valueOf(int), you could also use this ...


219

I believe this has already been answered by other users before me, so I only add it for the sake of completeness: the with statement simplifies exception handling by encapsulating common preparation and cleanup tasks in so-called context managers. More details can be found in PEP 343. For instance, the open statement is a context manager in itself, which ...


193

DateTime.UtcNow tells you the date and time as it would be in Coordinated Universal Time, which is also called the Greenwich Mean Time time zone - basically like it would be if you were in London England, but not during the summer. DateTime.Now gives the date and time as it would appear to someone in your current locale. I'd recommend using DateTime.Now ...


179

Why not hash your objects yourself manually, and use the resulting strings as keys for a regular JavaScript dictionary? After all you are in the best position to know what makes your objects unique. That's what I do. Example: var key = function(obj){ // some unique object-dependent key return obj.totallyUniqueEmployeeIdKey; // just an example }; var ...


176

What is the difference between a strongly typed language and a statically typed language? A statically typed language has a type system that is checked at compile time by the implementation (a compiler or interpreter). The type check rejects some programs, and programs that pass the check usually come with some guarantees; for example, the compiler ...


170

Assuming you are asking why you can't do this: public interface IFoo { void Bar(); } public class Foo: IFoo { public static void Bar() {} } This doesn't make sense to me, semantically. Methods specified on an interface should be there to specify the contract for interacting with an object. Static methods do not allow you to interact with an ...


156

Problem description JavaScript has no built-in general map type (sometimes called associative array or dictionary) which allows to access arbitrary values by arbitrary keys. JavaScript's fundamental data structure is the object, a special type of map which only accepts strings as keys and has special semantics like prototypical inheritance, getters and ...


150

I have been using the with statement as a simple form of scoped import. Let's say you have a markup builder of some sort. Rather than writing: markupbuilder.div( markupbuilder.p('Hi! I am a paragraph!', markupbuilder.span('I am a span inside a paragraph') ) ) You could instead write: with(markupbuilder){ div( p('Hi! I am a paragraph!', ...


139

The label tag logically links the label with the form element using the "for" attribute. Most browsers turn this into a link which activates the related form element. <label for="fiscalYear">Fiscal Year</label> <input name="fiscalYear" type="text" id="fiscalYear"/>


136

The contentEditable property for (IE, Firefox, and Safari) <table> <tr> <td><div contenteditable="true">This text can be edited<div></td> <td><div contenteditable="true">This text can be edited<div></td> </tr> </table> This will make the cells editable! Go ahead, ...


130

This is often misunderstood so let me clear it up. Static/Dynamic Typing Static typing is where the type is bound to the variable. Types are checked at compile time. Dynamic typing is where the type is bound to the value. Types are checked at run time. So in Java for example: String s = "abcd"; s will "forever" be a String. During its life it may ...


126

My (simplified) technical reason is that static methods are not in the vtable, and the call site is chosen at compile time. It's the same reason you can't have override or virtual static members. For more details, you'd need a CS grad or compiler wonk - of which I'm neither. For the political reason, I'll quote Eric Lippert (who is a compiler wonk, and ...


121

The @ symbol denotes an annotation type definition. That means it is not really an interface, but rather a new annotation type -- to be used as a function modifier, such as @override. See this javadocs entry on the subject.


120

It turns out that SQL can be Turing Complete even without a true 'scripting' extension such as PL/SQL or PSM (which are designed to be true programming languages, so that's kinda cheating). In this set of slides Andrew Gierth proves that with CTE and Windowing SQL is Turing Complete, by constructing a cyclic tag system, which has been proved to be Turing ...


118

Interfaces are a way to make your code more flexible. What you do is this: Ibox myBox=new Rectangle(); Then, later, if you decide you want to use a different kind of box (maybe there's another library, with a better kind of box), you switch your code to: Ibox myBox=new OtherKindOfBox(); Once you get used to it, you'll find it's a great (actually ...


115

~ is the unary one's complement operator -- it flips the bits of its operand. ~0 = 0xFFFFFFFF = -1 in two's complement arithmetic, ~x == -x-1 the ~ operator can be found in pretty much any language that borrowed syntax from C, including Objective-C/C++/C#/Java/Javascript.


115

In Python 3 / Python 2.7+ dict comprehensions works like this: d = {k:v for k, v in iterable} For Python 2.6 and earlier, see @fortan's answer.


112

There is no shorthand for Visual Studio 2008 or prior for VB.NET. In Visual Studio 2010 and beyond, you can use the following shorthand: public property FirstName as String This will be handled as your short version in C# is - I think they call it "Auto Property" See also: Auto-Implemented Properties (Visual Basic)


107

Python has such an operator: variable = something if condition else something_else Alternatively, although not recommended (see @karadoc's comment): variable = (condition and something) or something_else


104

It means that there is only one instance of "clock" in Hello, not one per instance of Hello. So if you were to do a "new Hello" anywhere in your code, in the first instance (without the "static"), it would make a new clock, but in the second instance, it would still use the original "clock". Unless you needed "clock" somewhere outside of main, this would ...


102

I think the optgroup tag is one feature that people don't use very often. Most people I speak to don't tend to realise that it exists. Example: <select> <optgroup label="Swedish Cars"> <option value="volvo">Volvo</option> <option value="saab">Saab</option> </optgroup> <optgroup label="German Cars"&...


100

My favourite bit is the base tag, which is a life saver if you want to use routing or URL rewriting... Let's say you are located at: www.anypage.com/folder/subfolder/ The following is code and results for links from this page. Regular Anchor: <a href="test.html">Click here</a> Leads to www.anypage.com/folder/subfolder/test.html Now if ...



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