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2

Aside from older compilers that simply want to avoid doing unnecessary work, the requirement would not necessarily be useful even today. Suppose you have one translation unit with the string literals "a" and "ba". Suppose you also have an optimising compiler that notices this translation unit's "a" can be optimised to "ba"+1. Now suppose you have another ...


0

The C standard has been traditionally written in a way that makes writing a basic C compiler a comparably simple task. This is important because a C compiler is usually among the first things that need to be provided on a new platform due to the ubiquity of the C language. For this reason, the C standard does provide syntax like the register keyword to ...


1

If an int is read through an unsigned int*, negative values wrap around as if they were casted to unsigned int. Is this correct? For a system without padding bits in integers and without trap representations, type-punning and signed-to-unsigned conversion are equivalent, for example: int n = ...; unsigned u1 = (unsigned)n; unsigned u2 = *(unsigned ...


2

If an unsigned int is read through an int*, the value must be within the range of int or an integer overflow occurs and the behaviour is undefined. Is this correct? Why would it be undefined? there is no integer overflow since no conversion or computation is done. We take an object representation of an unsigned int object and see it through an int. ...


0

It is not defined that happens since the c standard does not exactly define how singed integers should be stored. so you can not rely on the internal representation. Also there does no overflow occur. if you just typecast a pointer nothing other happens then another interpretation of the binary data in the following calculations. Edit Oh, i misread the ...


2

No, {} is not an expression in this case. Quoting the relevant parts of the annotated standard: http://es5.github.io/#x12.4 "An ExpressionStatement cannot start with an opening curly brace because that might make it ambiguous with a Block". In your case, {}/a/g is a block, followed by an expression statement consisting of a regular expression literal.


2

Where in the standart this is written In 8.3.5/5: After determining the type of each parameter, any parameter of type “array of T” or “function returning T” is adjusted to be “pointer to T” or “pointer to function returning T,” respectively.


2

I believe it was never considered necessary for the standard to actually spell out that arrays don't have padding, for the simple reason that there is absolutely no reason why such padding might ever be useful on any implementation. That said, I do believe the standard forbids such padding, through the description of the == operator. 6.5.9 Equality ...


0

I believe I found the answer to my question. The problem with this action is that there should be a copy constructor and an assignment operator defined for arrays if you want to return and read them. For now they can only be initialized with a const initialization list so enabling this feature will be pretty useless as you would only be able to return const ...


3

Beside the fact that the standard doesn't allow it, and the historical reasons that could explain it, the issue is syntactic: Imagine it would be permitted : how would you distinguish the naming of the whole array, vs the array address, vs a single element: auto fnReturningArray() { int a[3] = {0, 1, 2}; return a; // what is meant here ...


3

The precedence is implicit in the syntax diagram at 8/4, in the interplay between ptr-declarator and noptr-declarator. According to the syntax, *id[x] cannot be parsed as *id followed by [x] (the declarator before square brackets must be a noptr-declarator), but only as * followed by id[x]. This reading then matches the pattern of 8.3.1 Pointers rather than ...


10

Too long for a comment In clause 7, paragraph 3: In a simple-declaration, the optional init-declarator-list can be omitted only when declaring a class (Clause 9) or enumeration (7.2), that is, when the decl-specifier-seq contains either a class-specifier, an elaborated-type-specifier with a class-key (9.1), or an enum-specifier. In these cases ...


5

None of those three. It's simply a long-standing unimplemented (or rather, only partially implemented) feature. It's recently been completed, and will be available in GCC 5. Prior to that version, you can use the -fextended-identifiers command-line option, but there are some cases that it got wrong that led to it not being enabled by default. You can see ...


1

Pavel Krymets's answer has shown that the C# compiler fairly directly translates try/catch/finally to CIL .try/catch/finally, and Hans Passant's comment on my question points out where the CIL specification requires the current behaviour. So insofar as there is a problem, it is indeed a conflict between the C# compiler and the C# specification. Something I ...


3

As you said, you took care to not let any pointer or reference to the temporaries escape their scope. Using your lvalue-function (mine is called no_move) makes it easier to break that stricture inadvertently. Next, let's look at what xvalues are: Expiring objects, but objects nevertheless. This means, you can ignore they are on their funeral tour (if you ...


2

It's an editorial error. Essentially the line here should say \indextext{undefined} instead. The C++ standard uses \makeindex and a bunch of macros to generate their index and there is only one instance of \indextext{undefined behavior} being used and it points to istreambuf.iterator instead of pointing where it should. They tend to use ...


9

The people over at std-discussion seem to agree that this is just an editorial issue. I therefore raised it as such, so that it became draft issue 409 on github; it was promptly resolved and closed. I will one day update this answer a final time with an identifier for the first draft containing the fix; the first standard it appears in will be C++17.


32

I wasn't sure about your claim: Smaller functions are automatically "inlined" by optimizer irrespective of inline is mentioned or not... It's quite clear that the user doesn't have any control over function "inlining" with the use of keyword inline. I've heard that compilers are free to ignore your inline request, but I didn't think they disregarded ...


17

Both are correct. The use of inline might, or might not, influence the compiler's decision to inline any particular call to the function. So A is correct - it acts as a non-binding request that calls to the function be inlined, which the compiler is free to ignore. The semantic effect of inline is to relax the restrictions of the One Definition Rule to ...


2

This is not an answer from the inner question, but it is related about the assumption of the question: "I would expect no compiler error if the first overload was not instantiated, however I get the error." Sure? so, why this code generate a compiler error? template<typename T> void nil(T) {zzz} template<typename T> void foo(T*) {} int main() ...


5

It seems as though you're expecting only one of those overloads to be instantiated because only one of them will be called, but the compiler clearly has to instantiate both of them in order to determine whether either of them can be called and, if so, which one to use. The more formal answer is that both templates are candidates because your T can always be ...


1

I think problem is how .NET exception handling is built on top of Structured Exception Handling which has slightly different rules about throwing inside a finally block. When exception A happens SEH tries to find the first handler able to handle your exception type and then starts running all finally blocks, unwinding to it, but based on SEH logic there ...


2

By my reading of the standard, an implementation which used a 15-bit char could legally store int as a 15-bit magnitude and use a second 15-bit word to store the sign along with 14 bits of padding; in that case, an unsigned char would hold values 0 to 32,767 and an int would hold values from -32,767 to +32,767. Adding 1 to (unsigned char)32767 would indeed ...


8

The first part is not ill-formed because the standard text doesn't apply - no object of type A is declared there. For the second part, let's review how object construction works. The standard says (15.2/2) that if any part of construction throws, all fully constructed subobjects up to that point are destroyed in reverse order of construction. This means ...


3

My guess is that this is what happens. The implicitly generated B() constructor will first of all construct its base class subobject of type A. The language then states that if an exception is thrown during execution of the body of the B() constructor, the A subobject must be destroyed. Hence the need to access the deleted ~A() - it is formally needed for ...


1

Accessibility is orthogonal to deletedness: [C++11: 11.2/1]: If a class is declared to be a base class (Clause 10) for another class using the public access specifier, the public members of the base class are accessible as public members of the derived class and protected members of the base class are accessible as protected members of the derived class. ...


3

It's that B's destructor is generated by the compiler at the line of your error and it has a call to A's destructor which is deleted, hence the error. In the first example nothing is trying to call A's destructor hence no error.


12

It's well defined. sum+++i is parsed as sum++ + i, which results as 15 (with the side effect of incrementing sum). C11 §6.4 Lexical elements If the input stream has been parsed into preprocessing tokens up to a given character, the next preprocessing token is the longest sequence of characters that could constitute a preprocessing token. There ...


6

This statement printf("%d", sum+++i); corresponds to printf("%d", sum++ + i); and is a well-formed statement. There is no any undefined behaviour. The output will be 15 According to the C Standard (6.4 Lexical elements) 4 If the input stream has been parsed into preprocessing tokens up to a given character, the next preprocessing token is ...


3

No "system" header is required to be a file. Inclusion using <> is specified thusly: C++11 16.2 [cpp.include]/2: searches a sequence of implementation-defined places for a header identified uniquely by the specified sequence between the < and > delimiters, and causes the replacement of that directive by the entire contents of the header. How the ...


0

at line //8, modified code as : friend void N::test< R<T> >( R<T>&); correct too. friend void N::test<R<T>>(const R<T>&);//one type is friend with one type #1 friend void N::test<>(const R<T>&);// one type is friend with one type #2 I use some code proof that #1 is equal to #2 At last, I ...


2

lets understand same stuff by program test.c #include<stdio.h> #include"head.h" struct token id_tokens[10]; int main() { printf("In original file: %p",id_tokens); testing(); } head.h struct token { int temp; }; test1.c with v1 #include<stdio.h> #include"head.h" extern struct token* id_tokens; void testing () { printf("In other file ...


6

The first version is wrong. Arrays are NOT pointers, the declaration extern struct token *id_tokens; doesn't match the definition type struct token id_tokens[MAX_TOKENS];. Reference: C FAQ: I had the definition char a[6] in one source file, and in another I declared extern char *a. Why didn't it work?. Also, see this.


4

First, let's establish that we need a pointer to an object: 6.5.2.3 Structure and union members 4 A postfix expression followed by the -> operator and an identifier designates a member of a structure or union object. The value is that of the named member of the object to which the first expression points, and is an lvalue.96) If the first ...


3

C is an abstract language defined without knowledge of the machine that will eventually implement it. The definition of C does not assume that the underlying machine will even have registers in the conventional form (or a stack, or contiguous memory, or many other things irrelevant to this question that are present on real machines). The point being that ...


1

The clause says: has a class type so it must be a class type. The examples further down in the document show it does not have to be an lvalue though, taking selected parts of the code example we have: struct A { }; struct B : A { operator int&(); } b; int& ir = B(); // ir refers to the result of B::operator int& B() is not a lvalue but ...


5

Let's start with the indirection operator *: 6.5.3.2 p4: The unary * operator denotes indirection. If the operand points to a function, the result is a function designator; if it points to an object, the result is an lvalue designating the object. If the operand has type "pointer to type", the result has type "type". If an invalid value has been ...


2

No. Let's take this apart: &(((struct name *)NULL)->b); is the same as: struct name * ptr = NULL; &(ptr->b); The first line is obviously valid and well defined. In the second line, we calculate the address of a field relative to the address 0x0 which is perfectly legal as well. The Amiga, for example, had the pointer to the kernel in the ...


15

From a lawyer point of view, the expression &(((struct name *)NULL)->b); should lead to UB, since you could not find a path in which there would be no UB. IMHO the root cause is that at a moment you apply the -> operator on an expression that does not point to an object. From a compiler point of view, assuming the compiler programmer was not ...


12

Yes, this use of -> has undefined behavior in the direct sense of the English term undefined. The behavior is only defined if the first expression points to an object and not defined (=undefined) otherwise. In general you shouldn't search more in the term undefined, it means just that: the standard doesn't provide a meaning for your code. (Sometimes it ...


0

Apparently my reputation does not allow me to post a comment and I am not sure that it is OK to post this as it can be interpreted as subjective, but here is a reason that "a user of the language" may find this concept troublesome. Order of initialization. If a class has aggregates as bases as well as non-static data members, what order to they get ...


0

I think it is unrelated to virtual function because the program doesn't call virtual function with a pointer. And C is not A, though it is the same as A in memory. Maybe you confuse C with A.


0

Using the "as if" rule... The division can be done wherever the compiler feels like it; as long as the resulting code behaves as if the division was done in the correct place. This means that: a) if division by zero (or division resulting in an overflow) causes an exception (e.g. typical for integer division on 80x86) then the division can't be done ...


5

I'll quote [10.3]/2 again: A virtual member function C::vf of a class object S is a final overrider unless the most derived class (1.8) of which S is a base class subobject (if any) declares or inherits another member function that overrides vf. In a derived class, if a virtual member function of a base class subobject has more than one final overrider ...


2

Defect report 1321 has been accepted into the latest C++14 draft (N4140). This defect report clarifies the equivalency of dependent names, and at the same time clarifies that a dependent name must be an unqualified-id. Formerly, in C++11, dependent names could be arbitrary id-expressions. This means that qualified-id names are no longer dependent names, and ...


37

This can, in more complex declarations, actually help. Not in a simple one as yours - but consider the following: std::string foo(); namespace detail { int foo(long); // Another foo struct Bar { friend std::string ::foo(); // Doesn't compile for obvious reasons. friend std::string (::foo)(); // Voilà! }; } This code and ...


1

But the resolution is to consider any construct that could possibly be a declaration a declaration didn't mention in 6.8 directly. It says exactly the same thing in 6.8.1 There is an ambiguity in the grammar involving expression-statements and declarations: An expression- statement with a function-style explicit type conversion (5.2.3) as its ...


1

Yes you can rely on it. You could write your own really ugly operator, ignore the sum, and hope that the compiler will optimize the junk you've created. Please don't. I doubt anybody would like to read that code. Why don't you roll your own algorithm? template<class InputIt, class T> T accumulate_fast(InputIt first, InputIt last, T init) { for ...


1

As far as your guarantees go.. C++03 [lib.accumulate]: Requires: T must meet the requirements of CopyConstructible (20.1.3) and Assignable (23.1) types. binary_op shall not cause side effects. So the function must not have any 'side effects'. Which is defined as follows: C++03 [intro.execution]: Accessing an object designated by a volatile lvalue ...


3

Consider this absurd example: #include <iostream> struct A { void bar() { std::cout << "bar [" << i << "]" << std::endl; } ~A() { std::cout << "dtor" << std::endl; } int i; }; A& foo(A&& a) { return a; } int main() { foo(A{4}).bar(); } If the lifetime of the temporary wasn't ...



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