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2

T const&& can bind to rvalues of type T or const T. From 8.5.3 [dcl.init.ref] paragraph 5: 5 - A reference to type "cv1 T1" is initialized by an expression of type "cv2 T2" as follows: [...] — Otherwise, [...] the reference shall be an rvalue reference. [...] — If the initializer expression — is an xvalue, class prvalue, array prvalue or ...


0

Here is an example that implements is_comparable and handles a potentially private operator==. g++-4.7 chokes on this, but g++-4.8 and clang++ 3.4 handle it correctly in C++11 mode. #include <iostream> #include <utility> // is_comparable trait template<class T> class is_comparable { template<typename U> static char (&check ...


0

The definition of placement new is in N3797 in section 5.3.4.13: The new-placement syntax is used to supply additional arguments to an allocation function. If used, overload resolution is performed on a function call created by assembling an argument list consisting of the amount of space requested (the first argument) and the expressions in the ...


2

Suppose you have two functions that use your spinlock: SpinLock sl; int global_int=0; int read(){ sl.Lock(); int res=global_int; sl.Unlock(); return res; } void write(int val){ sl.Lock(); global_int=val; sl.Unlock(); } If two calls to BlindWrite happen concurrently on separate threads, then one (call it A) will acquire the ...


2

There are two parts to this question, we can tackle a comparison of sequence points rules without much trouble. This does not get us too far though, C and C++ are different languages which have different standards(the latest C++ standard is almost twice as large as the the latest C standard) and even though C++ uses C as a normative reference it would be ...


1

There was a discussion here: https://groups.google.com/a/isocpp.org/forum/#!topic/std-discussion/lk1qAvCiviY with utterances by various committee members. The general consensus appears to be There is no normative difference ill-formed; no diagnostic required is used only for compile-time rule violations, never for runtime rule violations. As I said in ...


4

I would try to explain "no diagnostic required" for behaviours categorized as undefined behaviour (UB). The Standard by saying "UB doesn't require diagnostic"1, gives compilers total freedom to optimize the code, as the compiler can eliminate many overheads only by assuming your program is completely well-defined (which means your program doesn't have UBs) ...


1

The C11 Standard states in 6.7.2.1p5: A bit-field shall have a type that is a qualified or unqualified version of _Bool, signed int, unsigned int, or some other implementation-defined type. This is a constraint, meaning, if a program declares a bit field with a type that does not fall into one of the categories above, a diagnostic must be printed. ...


0

The behavior in C++03 is the same as in C++11 and C99, you just need to look beyond the rule for left-shift. Section 5p5 of the Standard says that: If during the evaluation of an expression, the result is not mathematically defined or not in the range of representable values for its type, the behavior is undefined The left-shift expressions which are ...


2

We can find a similar exploration of this issue in the article What are const rvalue references good for? and the one use that stood out is this example form the standard library: template <class T> void ref (const T&&) = delete; template <class T> void cref (const T&&) = delete; which disables ref and cref for rvalues ...


1

I see two main uses for ref-qualifying a method. One is like you show in your get() && method, where you use it to select a potentially more efficient implementation that is only available when you know the object will no longer be used. But the other is a safety hint to prevent calling certain methods on temporary objects. You can use notation like ...


5

These two defect reports address your issue: Defect Report #316 Defect Report #317 Defect report 316 says (emphasis mine going forward): The rules for compatibility of function types in 6.7.5.3#15 do not define when a function type is "specified by a function definition that contains a (possibly empty) identifier list", [...] and it has a ...


1

the value of ‘B’ is not usable in a constant expression is incorrect. You are not performing an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion on B, which is the usual meaning of "value;" you are only taking its address. The only relevant constant-expression rule forbids: an id-expression that refers to a variable or data member of reference type unless the reference has a ...


1

Not a direct answer to your question, but the compiler simply generates assembly for pushing the value into the stack before calling the function. For example (using VS-2013 compiler): mov esi,esp push 7 call dword ptr [h1] If you add a local variable in this function, then you can use its address in order to find the values that ...


-2

try to use __stdcall before function declaration - and it wouldn't compile. The reason is that function call is __cdecl by default. It means (beside other features) that caller clears stack after call. So, caller function may push on stack everything it wants, because it knows what it had pushed and will clear stack in right way. __stdcall means (beside ...


-1

For functions without declared parameters no parameters/parameter types are inferred by the compiler. The following code is essentially the same: int f() { return 9; } int main() { return f(7, 8, 9); } I believe this has something to do with the underlying way variable length arguments are supported, and that () is basically identical to (...). ...


2

This is list-initialization. The rules are found in §8.5.4[dcl.init.list]/p3 of the standard: List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows: If the initializer list has no elements and T is a class type with a default constructor, the object is value-initialized. Otherwise, if T is an aggregate, aggregate ...


9

In the expression std::map<std::string, int> myMap = { { "One", 1 }, { "Two", 2 }, { "Three", 3 } }; on the right side you have a braced-init-list where each element is also a braced-init-list. The first thing that happens is that the initializer list constructor of std::map is considered. ...


1

Just for fun, the release-notes for gcc-4.9 indicate that its optimizer makes use of these rules, and for example can remove the conditional in int copy (int* dest, int* src, size_t nbytes) { memmove (dest, src, nbytes); if (src != NULL) return *src; return 0; } which then gives unexpected results when copy(0,0,0) is called (see ...


-1

Is it legal that two distinct functions share one definition? The foo in main isn't the same as the foo outside of main. Considering for a moment that this was valid code, you would have two different functions. One would be in the global namespace and be called ::foo. The other one would effectively in a namespace called "main" and be called main::foo. ...


3

The inner foo is just another forward deceleration of the same foo(). Consider the following example: int foo(); int foo(); int main() { cout << foo() << endl; } int foo() { // one definition return 42; } This will compile and run and there is no ambiguity because the compiler will replace the use of the same function with the ...


3

This is perfectly fine to redeclare a function like this, we can see this from draft C++ standard in two places, in section 3.1 Declarations and definitions which says: A declaration (Clause 7) may introduce one or more names into a translation unit or redeclare names introduced by previous declarations.[...] and goes on to say: A declaration ...


1

enum foobar{ FOO = 1, BAR = 5 }; enum foobar baz = 5; the baz declaration is equivalent to: enum foobar baz = BAR; as BAR is an int of value 5. This declaration is also valid: enum foobar qux = 42; C says an enum type is an integer type sufficiently large to represent all its enum constants. If the enum type is not sufficiently large, the ...


1

The C99 draft standard does not seem to restrict an enumerator to take on values of its members exclusively but it does say that the enumerators underlying type shall be capable of representing the values of all its members. This is covered in section 6.7.2.2 Enumeration specifiers: Each enumerated type shall be compatible with char, a signed integer ...


5

Variable qux is not going to hold any of the enums values. Its value will be equal to 42 in the underlying type the compiler selects to represent foobar, which is implementation-defined. This would not present a problem when the value is 42, but it may become an issue when the constant does not fit in the type selected by the compiler for your enumeration. ...


2

I only found one instance of the phrase in the standard, and that was in a non-normative note. Lacking any other definition, one must assume that the expression is interpreted as it would be normally in English; that the qualifier is at the highest level of the type declaration. Of course, we generally write the declarations (in plain text, not in C++) ...


6

This question gave me the chance of learning something new so I'm sharing it here, I didn't write the passage below! In C++, a cv-qualifier that applies to the first level of a type is called a toplevel cv-qualifier. For example, in: T *const p; the top-level cv-qualifier is const, and in: T const *volatile q; the top-level cv-qualifier is volatile. ...


1

The most convincing bit I could find to be an implicit definition lies in 7.14 Signal Handling, paragraph 3, in the definition of the SIGFPE signal: SIGFPE - an erroneous arithmetic operation, such as a zero divide or an operation resulting in overflow One might then draw a conclusion that any operation that may cause SIGFPE to be raised can be ...


3

Since we don't have a formal definition let's see if we can piece together a rationale interpretation of what an arithmetic operation should be. This will be speculative but I can not find any obvious defect reports or open issues that cover this. I guess I would start with what are considered arithmetic types, which is covered in section 6.2.5 Types ...


0

An arithmetic operation involve manipulation of numbers. sqrt also manipulate numbers and that could be the reason that standard says it an arithmetic operation.


6

First, the type of string literals: They are all constant arrays of their character type. 2.14.5 String literals [lex.string] 7 A string literal that begins with u8, such as u8"asdf", is a UTF-8 string literal and is initialized with the given characters as encoded in UTF-8. 8 Ordinary string literals and UTF-8 string literals are also referred to ...


1

static int var1, var2, var3; is equivalent to: static int var1; static int var2; static int var3; case 1 or case 2 both are used for readability purpose but meaning is same.


2

Yes the declarations in case 1 and 2 are identical. We can see this by going to the draft C99 standard section 6.7.5 Declarators which says (emphasis mine going forward): Each declarator declares one identifier, and asserts that when an operand of the same form as the declarator appears in an expression, it designates a function or object with the ...


1

You've just shown how variables can be declared differently. static int var1, var2, var3; or static int var1; static int var2; static int var3; has the same meaning ie; a variable of same data type(and also of same storage class) can be declared individually or all together once


6

They're equivalent. In case 2, all the variables will be static. The storage class specifier static applies to all the declared variables in the declaration.


0

Integral conversions for twos complement are defined as follows. n3936 S4.7/2,3 [n1570 s6.3.1.3 is similar] If the destination type is unsigned, the resulting value is the least unsigned integer congruent to the source integer (modulo 2n where n is the number of bits used to represent the unsigned type). [ Note: In a two’s complement representation, this ...


0

From the compiler writer's perspective, they don't care about "i += ++i + 1", because whatever the compiler does, the programmer may not get the correct result, but they surely get what they deserve. And nobody writes code like that. What the compiler writer cares about is *p += ++(*q) + 1; The code must read *p and *q, increase *q by 1, and increase *p ...


10

If you follow to 5.2.5 [expr.ref], you'll read in paragraph 3: 3 Abbreviating postfix-expression.id-expression as E1.E2, E1 is called the object expression. ... Previously, paragraph 2 of that section defines E1 -> E2 in terms of (*(E1)).E2, so this quote from paragraph 3 actually covers both . and -> operators.


1

C++11 §11.2/5: ” A member m is accessible at the point R when named in class N if m as a member of N is public, or m as a member of N is private, and R occurs in a member or friend of class N, or m as a member of N is protected, and R occurs in a member or friend of class N, or in a member or friend of a class P derived from N, ...


1

The protected access only applies to parent members of your own current object type. You don't get public access to the protected members of other objects of the parent type. In your example you only get access to the default base contructor as part of a Derived, not when it's a standalone object as b. Let's break down the quote you posted from the standard ...


0

I don't think it's complicated. One's complement arithmetic is actually simpler, because every number is the the complement of its negated value. The only problem is dealing with all bits set because it translates as negative zero. So yes, the cast S->U->S is definitely reversible, but U->S->U can fail for values with the high bit set. And you may not be ...


11

As far as I can tell this is covered by draft C++ standard section 8.3 Meaning of declarators paragraph 6 which says (emphasis mine going forward): In a declaration T D where D has the form ( D1 ) the type of the contained declarator-id is the same as that of the contained declarator-id in the declaration T D1 Parentheses do not ...


10

This looks like the most vexing parse to me. If it can be parsed as a declaration it will be. The first could be parsed as a declaration of an int variable (int ::x;), but the :: is illegal in that context. The second has to be an expression and so the compiler does the math, casts it to int, and throws away the result. Was this a pedantic question, or is ...


2

Note: I edited and corrected the statement about unsequenced initialization (thanks to @dyp). If your program doesn't start any threads, then all initializations happen in some (possibly indeterminate) sequence. There are no constraints beyond the constraints described in the Standard1 on which threads perform initialization and destruction of objects ...


8

It's guaranteed. From §12.6.2/p11 of N3797: In a non-delegating constructor, initialization proceeds in the following order: First, and only for the constructor of the most derived class (1.8), virtual base classes are initialized in the order they appear on a depth-first left-to-right traversal of the directed acyclic graph of base classes, ...


1

My reading of the footnote linked in that post is that type-punning through a union is never specified. Going from this, the standard says: With one exception, if a member of a union object is accessed after a value has been stored in a different member of the object, the behavior is implementation-defined. The footnote doesn't change that. The ...


3

Standardese The call to max() in the example entails a dependent name because its arguments depend on the template parameter T. Two-phase name lookup for such dependent names is defined in the Standard as follows: 14.6.4.2 Candidate functions [temp.dep.candidate] 1 For a function call where the postfix-expression is a dependent name, the candidate ...


3

Static initialization does not mean "initialization of variables with static storage duration". It is a much more limited term and is defined in §3.6.2p2. Together, zero-initialization and constant initialization are called static initialization; all other initialization is dynamic initialization. Static initialization shall be performed before any ...


1

Is it true that order of Static Initialization is implementation defined? I see pretty confused answers so let me summarize: NO, STATIC INITIALIZATION ORDER IS NOT IMPLEMENTATION DEFINED. Let's see why and in which cases. According to your quote let me assume you're asking about (static or dynamic) initialization of non-local variables static storage ...


1

Within the same compilation unit the order is well defined (i.e., it follows the order of definition). Order is unspecified across different compilation units. This is due to the fact that this issue is solved in linker level and not compiler level. This ambiguity can case the known static initialization fiasco.



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