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105

The method numpy.__config__.show() outputs information about linkage gathered at build time. My output looks like this. I think it means I am using the BLAS/LAPACK that ships with Mac OS. >>>import numpy as np >>>np.__config__.show() lapack_opt_info: extra_link_args = ['-Wl,-framework', '-Wl,Accelerate'] extra_compile_args = ['-...


90

That's bug no 961964 of MATLAB known since R2012b (8.0). MATLAB dynamically loads some libs with static TLS (thread local storage, e.g. see gcc compiler flag -ftls-model). Loading too many such libs => no space left. Until now mathwork's only workaround is to load the important(!) libs first by using them early (they suggest to put "ones(10)*ones(10);" in ...


64

BLAS is a collection of low-level matrix and vector arithmetic operations (“multiply a vector by a scalar”, “multiply two matrices and add to a third matrix”, etc ...). LAPACK is a collection of higher-level linear algebra operations. Things like matrix factorizations (LU, LLt, QR, SVD, Schur, etc) that are used to do things like “find the eigenvalues of a ...


48

I was having the same problem and removing the package libopenblas-base did the trick: sudo apt-get remove libopenblas-base As already explained by others, several packages provide incompatible versions of liblapack.so.3gf.


25

Restarting Matlab solved the problem for me.


23

There is no function for accessing a submatrix. However, because of the way matrix data is stored in LAPACK routines, you don't need one. This saves a lot of copying, and the data layout was (partially) chosen for this reason: Recall that a dense (i.e., not banded, triangular, hermitian, etc) matrix in LAPACK is defined by four values: a pointer to the ...


20

What you are searching for is this: system info I compiled numpy/scipy with atlas and i can check this with: import numpy.distutils.system_info as sysinfo sysinfo.get_info('atlas') Check the documentation for more commands.


19

You need to factor the matrix (by calling dgetrf) before you can solve the system using dgetrs. Alternatively, you can use the dgesv routine, which does both steps for you. By the way, you don't need to declare the interfaces yourself, they are in the Accelerate headers: // LAPACK test code #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <...


16

Introduction R uses the LINPACK dqrdc routine, by default, or the LAPACK DGEQP3 routine, when specified, for computing the QR decomposition. Both routines compute the decomposition using Householder reflections. An m x n matrix A is decomposed into an m x n economy-size orthogonal matrix (Q) and an n x n upper triangular matrix (R) as A = QR, where Q can be ...


15

Here is the working code for computing the inverse of a matrix using lapack in C/C++: #include <cstdio> extern "C" { // LU decomoposition of a general matrix void dgetrf_(int* M, int *N, double* A, int* lda, int* IPIV, int* INFO); // generate inverse of a matrix given its LU decomposition void dgetri_(int* N, double* A, int* lda, int*...


15

Vendor-provided LAPACK / BLAS libraries (Intel's IPP/MKL have been mentioned, but there's also AMD's ACML, and other CPU vendors like IBM/Power or Oracle/SPARC provide equivalents as well) are often highly optimized for specific CPU abilities that'll significantly boost performance on large datasets. Often, though, you've got very specific small data to ...


13

Short answer: Don't use Boost's LAPACK bindings, these were designed for dense matrices, not sparse matrices, use UMFPACK instead. Long answer: UMFPACK is one of the best libraries for solving Ax=b when A is large and sparse. http://www.cise.ufl.edu/research/sparse/umfpack/ http://www.cise.ufl.edu/research/sparse/umfpack/UMFPACK/Doc/QuickStart.pdf ...


13

First, M has to be a two-dimensional array, like double M[3][3]. Your array is, mathematically speaking, a 1x9 vector, which is not invertible. N is a pointer to an int for the order of the matrix - in this case, N=3. A is a pointer to the LU factorization of the matrix, which you can get by running the LAPACK routine dgetrf. LDA is an integer for the "...


13

First things first, if you are going to learn C++, learn C++11. The previous C++ standard was released in 2003, meaning it's already ten years old. That's a lot in IT world. C++11 skills will also smoothly translate to upcoming C++1y (most probably C++14) standard. The main difference between std::vector and std::array is the dynamic (in size and allocation)...


12

Thank you so much to osgx! After reading his comment, I took a second look at the README file! It turns out I was missing '-O1 -larmadillo' in the command! Here's the command I used to get it working: g++ example1.cpp -o example1 -O1 -larmadillo Stupid mistake, I know.... It just goes to remind you how important it is to read the README. The README also ...


12

Apple does not document the LAPACK code at all, I guess because they just implement the standard interface from netlib.org. It's a shame that you cannot search the these function names from the built-in Xcode docs, however the solution is fairly straight forward: just specify the function name in the URL e.g. for dgetrf_() go to, http://www.netlib.org/...


11

You can use oct2py, which IIUC was started by its author because pytave didn't work on win32. It is successfully used in IPython through its octavemagic extension and I can tell it is easy to use on its own, the code is maintained (I reported a little Unicode bug and the author fixed it in a day) and works well. Most of the times is as simple as: >>&...


11

To understand what is going on here, let's consider what foo1 = foo2 + foo3 actually does. First it evaluates foo2 + foo3. To do this it will allocate a new temporary array to hold the output Then it will bind the name foo1 to this new temporary array, undoing all effort you put in to pre-allocate the output array. In short, you see that memory usage ...


10

Many people doing "serious" matrix stuff, rely on BLAS, adding LAPACK / ATLAS (normal matrices) or UMFPACK (sparse matrices) for more advanced math. The reason is that this code is well-tested, stable, reliable, and quite fast. Furthermore, you can buy them directly from a vendor (e.g. Intel MKL) tuned towards your architecture, but also get them for free. ...


10

The routine dgesdd computes the SVD for a double precision matrix. Do you just need an example of how to use it? Have you tried reading the documentation? An example using the C LAPACK bindings (note that I wrote this just now, and haven't actually tested it. Also note that the exact types for arguments to clapack vary somewhat between platforms so you ...


10

BLAS doesn't include eigenvalue solvers, and CUBLAS is no different in that regard. The UTK developed Magma library includes a couple of GPU accelerated eigenvalue problem routines. I don't think xSPGV is implemented, but several other are. Depending on the characteristics of your matrix have, there might be something you could use.


9

#include <Accelerate/Accelerate.h> #include <stdio.h> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { /* Dimension of the matrix */ __CLPK_integer n = 3; /* Number of right-hand side vectors to solve for */ __CLPK_integer nrhs = 1; /* Note the ordering of the entries in A. LAPACK uses "column major" ordering as follows: ...


9

If you look inside the lapack.m file from the FEX submission mentioned, you will see a couple of examples on how to use the function: Example: SVD decomposition using DGESVD: X = rand(4,3); [m,n] = size(X); C = lapack('dgesvd', ... 'A', 'A', ... % compute ALL left/right singular vectors m, n, X, m, ... % input MxN matrix ...


9

The performance will be completely identical in either C or Fortran, as the actual implementation backing the library calls are the same, and essentially all of the time in your code is spent in those library calls.


9

As it uses the dynamically loaded versions, you can just do this: $ ldd anyoftheCmodules.so where anyoftheCmodules.so could be, for example, numpy/core/_dotblas.so, which links to libblas.so.


8

LAPACK does not have special support built in for sparse matrices, but ARPACK does. Depending on the machine you plan to run this on, this could rule out use of LAPACK, as you may run out of memory for very large matrices. See http://www.netlib.org/utk/people/JackDongarra/la-sw.html for a summary of various linear algebra libraries. There is no way to ...


8

AMD's ACML is a free download, but it is binary only, not open source, and native code, not .NET. Performance is generally superior to the Netlib.org code, and generally roughly the same as Intel's MKL -- which is not free IIRC. The download includes one sample that demonstrates how to bind it to C#. Not any different from calling any other C or C++ ...


8

In SVD decomposition $A=UDV^T$ only $D$ is unique (up to reordering). It is more or less easy to see that $cU$ and $\frac{1}{c}V$ will give the same decomposition. So it is not surprising that different algorithms can give different results. What matters is that $D$ must be the same for all algorithms.


8

Have you considered using OMPC, http://ompc.juricap.com/ ? I have used it with great success when not wishing to re-write some numerical linear algebra routines. I can imagine that the more esoteric the Matlab commands, the harder it would be to translate... but it might be worth a try. In the end, you're going to want to convert your Matlab code to Python ...


8

Besides scaling, dtrsm can also solve systems in which the triangular matrix is right-multiplied into the unknown matrix (i.e., it can solve XA = B as well as AX = B). On the other hand, dtrsm can silently fail if A is singular, whereas dtrtrs checks for this condition and reports an error. In a "typical" LAPACK distribution, dtrtrs is just a wrapper that ...



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