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197

will I get the same results? Not really. I don't know of a workaround for PHP 5.2, though. What is the difference between new self and new static? self refers to the same class whose method the new operation takes place in. static in PHP 5.3's late static bindings refers to whatever class in the hierarchy which you call the method on. In the ...


65

You definitely need to read Late Static Bindings in the PHP manual. However, I'll try to give you a quick summary. Basically, it boils down to the fact that the self keyword does not follow the rules of inheritance. self always resolves to the class in which it is used. This means that if you make a method in a parent class and call it from a child ...


19

As of PHP 5.3.0, PHP implements a feature called late static binding which can be used to reference the called class in the context of static inheritance. Late static binding tries to solve that limitation by introducing a keyword that references the class that was initially called at runtime. It was decided not to introduce a new keyword but rather use ...


9

So, to wrap it all up, are these uses (and similar ones) of late static binding are an overkill? Is there any noticeable performance hit? Also, does frequent use of late binding reduce the overall performance boost given by opcode caches? The introduction of late static binding fixes a flaw in PHP's object model. It's not about performance, it's about ...


8

Late static binding will only work for new definitions of variables / methods. Thus, in your example, the $color property of Super will always be modified instead of ChildA or ChildB. To make use of late static binding, you need to use the static keyword instead of self. Furthermore, you need to redefine the $color property of your ChildA and ChildB classes: ...


8

Use get_called_class() instead of __CLASS__. You'll also be able to replace static with self as the function will resolve the class through late binding for you: class A { public static function who() { echo get_called_class(); } public static function test() { self::who(); } } class B extends A {} B::test();


7

If method this code is in is not static, you can get a work-around in 5.2 by using get_class($this). class A { public function create1() { $class = get_class($this); return new $class(); } public function create2() { return new static(); } } class B extends A { } $b = new B(); var_dump(get_class($b->create1()), ...


7

What you're looking for is the get_called_class function. From the PHP docs:- Gets the name of the class the static method is called in. So class Grandpa { public function call() { // Well, I want to know who calls me here echo get_called_class(); } } will output the name of the called class.


6

Edit: What you try to achieve is not possible with PHP 5.1. There is no late static bindings PHP Manual in PHP 5.1, you need to explicitly name the child class to call the child function: Test123456::test(), self will be Test123 in a static function of the class Test123 (always) and the static keyword is not available to call a static function in PHP 5.1. ...


5


5

Prior version 5.3 Only with the following work around: abstract class AbstractParent { function __construct($param) { print_r($param); } abstract public static function test(); private static function test2($classname) { return new $classname(1234); } } class SpecificClass extends AbstractParent { public static function test() {return ...


5

I'm not sure what specific workaround it was talking about, I can think of quite a few that can work. I personally wouldn't use these in any code. I'd recommend you take a look Is it possible to overuse late static binding in PHP? and rethink if there's a better way to do whatever you hope accomplish. Also keep in mind my code is completely untested as I ...


5

You begin by making a method call in a static context: stat::isValid('two'); When you do this, PHP "remembers" the context from within which isValid was called specifically so that it can resolve what to bind to when it sees something like static:: inside the method body, determine if some property you are trying to access is visible, and in general be ...


5

There is not very obvious behavior: Following code produces 'alphabeta' class alpha { function classname(){ return __CLASS__; } function selfname(){ return self::classname(); } function staticname(){ return static::classname(); } } class beta extends alpha { ...


4

There's a doc for that: PHP: Late Static Bindings


4

You can do it in PHP 5.3, which is still in alpha. What you're looking for is called Late-Static-Binding. You want the parent class to refer to the child class in a static method. You can't do it yet, but it's coming... Edit: You can find more info here - http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.late-static-bindings.php


4

For example: abstract class Builder { public static function build() { return new static; } } class Member extends Builder { public function who_am_i() { echo 'Member'; } } Member::build()->who_am_i();


4

In general, you can consider that you have todesign the base class for extensibility. If a member function (to use the C++ vocabulary) isn't designed to be overridden, there is a good chance than overriding it will in practice not be possible and for sure it won't it be possible without knowledge of what the class designer think is implementation details ...


4

Yes, this is correct. The class that is calling the private method is the same that is declaring it. It doesn't matter that it may or may not instantiate a child class. You just can't have any code in the child class calling the private method of the parent. In other words: class Foo { protected function bar() { $this->baz(); } ...


4

This works: <?php class Fruit{ protected static $name = Null; public static function setName($name){ static::$name = $name; } public static function getName(){ return static::$name; } } class Apple extends Fruit{protected static $name;}; class Banana extends Fruit{protected static $name;}; ...


4

One code sample I have got from a website, but it was difficult for me to understand the output. I am sharing the code This code is an exact replica from the PHP Manual of the Late Static Binding concept.. Explanation of this code from the manual.. Late static bindings' resolution will stop at a fully resolved static call with no fallback. On ...


3

Requires late static binding, which is present in PHP 5.3.0 and later. http://us3.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.late-static-bindings.php In getVal, you'd want to use return static::valB; instead of return self::valB;


3

The obvious answer is because most functions shouldn't be virtual. As AProgrammer points out, unless a function has been designed explicitly to be overridden, you probably can't override it (virtual or not) without breaking class invariants. (When I work in Java, for example, I end up declaring most functions final, as a matter of good engineering. C++ ...


3

The feature you are looking for is called Late Static Binding (LSB) and thankfully has been introduced to PHP in 5.3. You may read about it here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.late-static-bindings.php This is your code rewritten using LSB. <?php class BaseModel { public static $name; public static function get($id) { echo ...


3

The use of late static binding only changes the method that gets chosen for the call. Once the method is chosen, visibility rules are applied to determine whether or not it may be called. For B, A::test finds and calls A::foo. The comment in B isn't correct--foo isn't copied to B. Since it's private, it is only callable from other methods in A such as ...


3

/** @return Control */ for non-static: /** @return $this */ but it's not documented in phpdoc manual


3

static methods (early- or late-bound) create tight coupling and (thus) reduce testability. you can create large programs in PHP without using more than a few static calls. for me, late static methods are a non-feature. edit to answer Marco Demaio's question, how do static method reduce testability? i'm sorry if this is all obvious to you, static members ...


3

The feature you're looking for is called "late static binding", and is documented here. The short version is that in order to get static variables working the way you want them to, you need to use static:: instead of self::. Note: this only works in PHP 5.3 and greater.


3

The correct way would be initializing the value with a sane default value (empty array) in the parent class. That way you can be sure that the property will exist. Everything you access in one class should be available by properly defining it when you are using the class on its own.


3

You are trying to call the method stat::isValid() statically but have not declared it static. Change the stat class to: class stat { protected static $invalidNumbers = array('one', 'two'); // needs to be declared static static function isValid($number) { return in_array($number, static::$invalidNumbers); } } Note that, if ...



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