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12

Here's a quick & dirty solution using base graphics and unicode symbols: library(extrafont) # font_import() # ... if you need to loadfonts() getPch <- function(x) { sapply(x, function(x) { switch(as.character(x), "0"=-9675, "25"=-9684, "50"=-9682, "75"=-9685, "100"=-9679 )}) } par(mar=c(2, 7, 2, 4)) plot(y ...


7

Here is an example to get started on the left graph using base graphics (there are xspline functions for grid graphics as well if you want to use those, I don't know how to incorporate them with ggplot2, but lattice probably would not be too hard): plot.new() par(mar=c(0,0,0,0)+.1) plot.window(xlim=c(0,3), ylim=c(0,8)) xspline( c(1,1.25,1.75,2), c(7,7,4,4), ...


6

See ?panel.xblocks in the latticeExtra package: library(latticeExtra) x <- 1:100 xyplot( rnorm(100) ~ x, type="l", col="black") + layer_(panel.xblocks(x, x > 20, col = "lightgrey"))


6

Jeez, I wasted too much time on this ... It's not perfect - one would need to play with the units of the axes to get it to always produce "circular" circles (as opposed to ovals), but you get the gist: # Data data <- rep(c(0, 25, 50, 75, 100),6) data <- matrix(data, ncol=3, byrow=TRUE) colnames(data) <- paste0("factor_", seq(3)) rownames(data) ...


5

Using lwd in the call to xyplot changes the width of the line in the plot but not in the legend; the legend uses the parameter settings, which can be changed using the par.settings parameter. This is usually the preferred way to change the line width in the plot, as then it changes in the legend as drawn by auto.key as well, but in your case, this behavior ...


5

As John Paul pointed out, the line widths are controlled by the the box.rectangle and box.umbrella components of lattice's graphical parameter list. (For your future reference, typing names(trellis.par.get()) is a fast way to scan the list of graphical attributes controlled by that list.) Here's a slightly cleaner way to set those options for one or more ...


4

One thing you can do is get the trellis settings for the box, and change those. Try rect.settings<-trellis.par.get("box.rectangle") #gets all rectangle settings rect.settings$lwd<-4 #sets width to 4, you can choose what you like trellis.par.set("box.rectangle",rect.settings) Put these above your bwplot call and it should do it. The box rectangle ...


4

You're looking for as.layer, I think; try this. It's in the latticeExtra library as well. library(latticeExtra) a + as.layer(b) See documentation here: http://latticeextra.r-forge.r-project.org/#as.layer


4

xyplot(y~ts, scales=list(x=list(at= as.numeric(ts), labels=format(ts, "%H")))) To make the ticks every six hours you just use seq.POSIXt: xyplot(y~ts, scales=list( x=list(at= seq(as.POSIXct(t_ini), by="6 hour", length=5), labels=format(seq(as.POSIXct(t_ini), by="6 hour", length=5), "%H hrs")) ...


4

Or without the latticeExtra, simply: xyplot(y~ x|a, data = df, groups = b, type = c("p", "smooth"))


4

Prelim code require("ggplot2") mod <- loess(Income ~ Education, data = Income) Income <- transform(Income, Fitted = fitted(mod)) ggplot version ggplot(Income, aes(Education, Income)) + geom_point(color="red") + geom_smooth(se=FALSE, method = "loess") + geom_segment(aes(x = Education, y = Income, xend = Education, yend = ...


4

I can think of a couple of ways of going about this with lattice. You could either use xyplot and fill panels with panel.fill, or you can use levelplot. The polygons themselves have to be added with a custom panel and lpolygon. Here's how I've done it with levelplot. I'm really a lattice novice, though, and there may very well be some shortcuts that I don't ...


4

Having thought about this a bit more since my previous answer, I've come up with a simpler way of producing multipanel (if appropriate) fanplots, overlaid on a levelplot, as shown in the Wikipedia Fan chart page. This approach works with a data.frame that has two independent variables and zero or more conditioning variables that separate data into panels. ...


3

There is a further feature of lattice plots that needs mention. They are really objects, so methods exist for modifying their list representations; myBW <- bwplot(x ~ type|month, data = df, panel=function(...) { panel.abline(h=0, col="green") panel.bwplot(...) }) newBW <- update(myBW, par.settings=list(box.rectangle=list(lwd=4) )) plot(newBW) ...


3

Try this xyplot(1:10~1:10, scales=list(x=list(at=NULL))) you should read the docs in ?xyplot


3

You are just looking for the panel function that is built into vcd:::cotabplot library(vcd) data("alzheimer", package = "coin") alz <- xtabs(~smoking + disease + gender, data = alzheimer) cotabplot(~ smoking + disease | gender, data = alz, panel = cotab_coindep, n = 5000)


3

Use +.trellis and layer combined with grid.raster: library(grid) library(latticeExtra) library(png) image <- readPNG(system.file("img", "Rlogo.png", package="png")) p + layer(grid.raster(as.raster(image)), under=TRUE)


3

(Nice to see a good lattice question.) I don't agree with agstudy that subscripts would be a good indexing strategy. In this case they work by accident because your points are the same number as your labels and in the same order. Subscripts are that mechanism for picking individual data points for panels rather than a mechanism for indexing panels. Consider ...


3

Use col.regions wireframe(volcano, drape = TRUE, aspect = c(61/87, 0.4), light.source = c(10,0,10), col.regions = colorRampPalette(c("blue", "pink"))(100)) As per your coment and with inspiration from @DWin who I am sure will do a better job here, perhaps with ?persp you can get closer to what you want. > persp(x, y, z, theta = ...


3

If it's not critical that you use bwplot, you may try ggplot: ggplot(data = mpg, aes(x = class, y = hwy, fill = factor(year))) + geom_boxplot() + coord_flip() + scale_fill_grey(start = 0.5, end = 0.8) + theme_classic()


3

You should also invert x and y roles in panel.groups function. Use trellis.par.set to change fill color of superposed symbol data(mpg, package = "ggplot2") library(latticeExtra) mycolors <- grey.colors(5, start = 0.1, end = 0.9) trellis.par.set(superpose.symbol = list(fill = mycolors,col=mycolors)) bwplot(class~hwy, data = mpg, groups = year, ...


3

Unfortunately I can't help you with Dotplot, but I find it fairly straightforward using ggplot. You just need to rearrange the data slightly. library(ggplot2) # grab data for males df_m <- data[ , c(1, 2, 4, 5)] df_m$sex <- "m" names(df_m) <- c("ID", "avg", "lower", "upper", "sex") df_m # grab data for females df_f <- data[ , c(1, 3, 6, 7)] ...


3

OK here is how you can interpolate the surface with the akima package. By default it will give you a 40x40 grid, based on the existing surface: require(akima) require(reshape2) temp.df<-expand.grid(x=2:4,y=2:4,z=0) temp.df$z<-rnorm(9,10,3) surface<-melt(interp(temp.df$x,temp.df$y,temp.df$z)) # melt() stretches out the surface to x,y,z as you've ...


3

Love what Roger Peng said when comparing Base/Lattice/gglot2 packages in his ppt: https://github.com/rdpeng/CourseraLectures/blob/master/ggplot2_part1.pptx Base “Artist’s palette” model Start with blank canvas and build up from there Start with plot function (or similar) Use annotation functions to add/modify (text, lines, points, axis) Pros: ...


3

Panel functions are passed coordinates x and y, from the notation y ~ x. Hence you write your panel function in terms of those arguments, not the names of your own data objects passed to those arguments. Then it works: x <- rnorm (100) z <- x + rnorm(100) f <- gl(2,50,labels =c("Groups 1" , "Groups 2")) df <- data.frame(x = x, z = z, f = f) ## I ...


3

I think you can get what you want simply with a stacked barchart. library(lattice) barchart(b~a, data=test, col=c("#00FFFF"), group=d, stack=TRUE)


3

You may try this: dotplot(car ~ mpg | as.factor(cyl), data=df, layout=c(3,1), pch = 19, groups = carb < 2, col = c("blue", "red")) The groups argument carb < 2 results in a logical vector. Alphabetically FALSE comes before TRUE. Thus, cases where carb < 2 is FALSE get the first colour (blue), and cases where carb < 2 get the second ...


3

You can use the scales argument in barchart for this. library(lattice) barchart(ratings ~ cond, groups = group, ylim = 1:9, auto.key = TRUE, xlab = "Condition", ylab = "Attraction Ratings", main = "Attraction Ratings as a function of Condition and Group", scales = list(y = list(at = c(1:9))))


3

I figured out how to do it with base graphics: Fit model: model <- loess(Income ~Education + Seniority, data=Income2) Create sequencies of x's and y's: x <-range(Income2$Education) x <- seq(x[1], x[2], length.out=50) y <- range(Income2$Seniority) y <- seq(y[1], y[2], length.out=50) Create values of z with all the combinations of x ...


3

Rather than passing a col= parameter to barchart, lattice much prefers if you change the par.settings. In this case. the color of the bars is determined by superpose.polygon because you have different groups of ratings. This should do what you want data<-data.frame( service = c("renew_patent", "apply_benefit", "apply_employment_tribunal"), ...



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