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9

plot has a plot.function method plot(eq, 1, 1000) Or curve(eq, 1, 1000)


7

For the first question, I find dev.print to be the best when working interactively. First, you set up your plot visually and when you are happy with what you see, you can ask R to save the current plot to disk dev.print(pdf, file="filename.pdf"); You can replace pdf with other formats such as png. This will copy the image exactly as you see it on screen. ...


7

Seaborn is the most effective library I have found for doing faceted plots in python. Its a pandas aware wrapper around matplotlib which takes care of all the subplotting for you and updates the matplotlib styling to look more modern. It produces some really lovely output. The faceting is done using the grid part of the library. It works a little diffently ...


7

It's not a very extensible function. Howerver, you could do some surgery to insert the behavior you like. Assuming you are on a system where you can source the file from an https address, you could do source("https://raw.githubusercontent.com/iascchen/VisHealth/master/R/calendarHeat.R") Or you could use the httr library library(httr) ...


7

You need to create a custom panel function that takes into account the box.width of your bars. After some experimentation I came up with this, which seems to work: panel = function(x, y, ...) { dots <- list(...) br <- dots$box.ratio panel.barchart(x, y, ...) panel.abline(h = seq_along(x) - 0.5*(br/(br+1)), col="orange", lwd=0.7) } Try it: d ...


7

The essence of your question, it seems, is how to produce a contour plot in ggplot with discrete filled contours, rather than continuous contours as you would get using the conventional geom_tile(...) approach. Here is one way. x<-seq(1,11,.03) # note finer grid y<-seq(1,11,.03) xyz.func<-function(x,y) ...


7

dat <- dat[order(dat[, "x"]),] dat$group <- cumsum(c(1, diff(dat$y) < 0)) xyplot(y ~ x, data = dat, groups = group, panel = function(x, y,...) { panel.xyplot(x, y, type = "o", col = trellis.par.get("plot.line")$col, ...) } )


5

(Thanks for this good lattice question.) You should use Subscripts because it is the mechanism for picking individual data points for panels : Here you want to pick the groups by panel: groups[subscripts]. Once you have the right grouping variables you can use it to split your data and pick the first element of each group: ## first points xx = ...


5

For each value of type, you'll need to construct a custom panel function. Fortunately, if you model the functions closely on existing lattice code (starting out by having a look at panel.xyplot), that shouldn't be too hard. For example, the two custom panel functions below include many lines of code but only a couple of lines (marked with comments) that I ...


5

Since the key is a grob of its own it is perfectly possible to extract it from the plot object and draw it separately where ever you please. library(grid) # Separate plot and key s <- spplot(meuse.grid[,'dist'], colorkey = list(space = "left", height = 0.5) ) key <- draw.colorkey(s$legend[[1]]$args$key) s$legend <- NULL # Otherwise we'd get ...


4

Supposing your data is in a dataframe called df, you can do that with the help of the dplyr and tidyr packages: library(dplyr) library(tidyr) wide <- df %>% select(date,classes) %>% group_by(date,classes) %>% summarise(n=n()) %>% # as @akrun said, you can also use tally() spread(classes, n, fill=0) Using the example data ...


4

I hope I'm not missing anything, but it looks to me like you're just looking for table: table(df[c("date", "classes")]) # classes # date english french spanish # 9/1/11 1 2 1 # 9/2/11 1 1 0 # 9/3/11 0 0 2 # 9/5/11 2 1 1 The result is a table (which is also a matrix) so ...


4

For some reason segplot doesn't seem to respect the groups= parameter like most lattice plots do. Here's kind of a messy work around with the first step being generating your grouping variable df$group<-with(df, ifelse(lower>1, "superior", ifelse(upper<1, "inferior","contain"))) segplot(reorder(factor(geno), rd) ~ lower + upper, data = df, ...


4

I solved my problem, thanks to @josh-obrien. Now, when the graphic title is longer than 70 characters it is wrapped to 65 characters wide version. library(HH) ppi <- 150 jpeg("ssb_%02d.jpg", width=7*ppi, height=4*ppi, res=ppi) for(i in 1:2){ if(stri_length(items[i,])>70){ graphic.title <- paste(strwrap(items[i,], width = 65), ...


4

The general answer will be to use HH::ancovaplot() directly (rather than implicitly via HH::ancova()) along with latticeExtra's handy layer() function and overloaded + operator. I'll leave it to you to work out the fiddly details required to make it look exactly how you want it to. ancovaplot(Sodium ~ Calories * Type, data=hotdog) + layer(panel.ablineq(lm(y ...


4

Use the as.layer function with under = TRUE: rproblv + as.layer(migmaplv, under = TRUE)


4

Here is what I'd do: ## Create a named vector of fill colors red <- rgb(249/255, 21/255, 47/255) # NN: amber <- rgb(255/255, 126/255, 0/255) # YN: green <- rgb(39/255, 232/255, 51/255) # YY: fillCols <- c(NN=red, YN=amber, YY=green) ## Create a panel function that, with access to the subset of points plotted ## in the current panel, picks out ...


3

Factors print our in order of their levels. Just flip the levels x <- sample(1:50,100,T) y <- as.factor(sample(letters,100,T)) y <- factor(y, levels=rev(levels(y))) xyplot(y~x)


3

I don't know exactly how you want this to look, but here is a start. In place of auto.key=T put: key=list(space="right", lines=list(col=c("purple","darkgreen"), lty=c(3,2), lwd=6), text=list(c("Purple Line"," Dark-green Line")) ) This will put the key on the right side of the graph. You can use "top", "bottom", or "left" instead. If you ...


3

I did some searching on the web, and this are some ways that I found: The easiest way is using curve without predefined function curve(x^2, from=1, to=50, , xlab="x", ylab="y") You can also use curve when you have a predfined function eq = function(x){x*x} curve(eq, from=1, to=50, xlab="x", ylab="y") If you want to use ggplot, you have a choise ...


3

Here an example using R base plots: reproducible example ## you should set the seed with random data set.seed(1) x <- rnorm(100) plot your data ## note the use of extrandrange to be sure that we have enough spaces ## to plot and show your extrema plot(x,type='l',ylim=extendrange(x)) extract extrema ## wich.max extreact the index of the extrema ...


3

Whether there is "replication" of the arguments to the length of the longest argument maximum is governed by the rep argument which defaults to TRUE: xyplot(rnorm(10)~rnorm(10), key = list(rep=FALSE, text = list(c("Title", "A", "B", "C")), points = list(pch=c(NA, 16, 17, 18), col="Red"), text = list(c("Title", "A", ...


3

It appears that you need to use a custom panel function to do this, and to use panel.abline instead of panel.grid. The best I could come up with is to set the tick points semi-manually. library(lattice) set.seed(123) #### make it reproducible df<-data.frame(x=runif(100,1,1e7),y=runif(100,0.01,.08),t=as.factor(sample(1:3,100,replace=T))) # do this one ...


3

The problem with doing what you want easily is that the ranef() results don't include the information that you want, and the dotplot.ranef.merMod() method is a bit too hard-coded to modify easily ... I'm going to show a ggplot solution instead. If you insist on a lattice solution, try examining lme4:::dotplot.ranef.merMod and seeing if you can adapt it ...


3

The pairs() function gets you close, but if you want just the six panels as shown in your layout matrix, then you might have to construct it by hand. You can construct the chart using grid, or ggplot and gtable. Here is a ggplot / gtable version. The script works with your dat data file (i.e., the long form). It constructs a list of the six ggplot ...


3

Yeah, I think it is a subset problem, not a lattice one. You don't include an example, but it looks like you want to keep only rows where there are more than 3 rows for each value of whatever is in column 2 of your data frame. If so, here is a data.table solution. library(data.table) test.dt <- as.data.table(test.df) test.dt.subset <- ...


3

Lattice is going to create a strip for each conditioning variable. If you want just one strip, try conditioning on the interaction. For example wireframe(pred~Sepal.Width+Petal.Width|interaction(Species,Petal.Length), pd, drape=FALSE,scale=list(arrows=FALSE), subset=(Species=="setosa"), layout=c(3,3)) which gives You can create the ...


3

Lattice allows you to specify the number of columns and rows for the plots which then spill over onto adjacent pages if a multi-page device is used: pdf("nine.pdf", onefile=TRUE, paper="special") wireframe(pred~Sepal.Width+Petal.Width|interaction(Species,Petal.Length), pd, drape=FALSE,scale=list(arrows=FALSE), subset=(Species=="setosa"), ...


2

I'm wondering if the lattice update function is what you want: update(comb, layout=c(1,3))


2

You said that you only want 1 y-axis which means you wouldn't see much of the Urban variable (only a horizontal line) if both are shown on a single y-axis with their actual data. My suggestion would be to scale the data so that it can be displayed and compared easily. However, since the actual values are not visible this way, I don't know if this helps you ...



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