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7

weightx/y specifies the amount of "weight" a given cell will have. The greater the weight, the more space the cell will want to occupy. The amount of space available is the remaining left over space after all the other components have been laid out. fill determines how the component will expand to occupy the space available to a given cell. That is, if ...


5

This is a "slight" step in the direction your looking for... If you want it to work a little more like GridLayout (so that the first series of labels appear on the top/left), you're going to have to include some "filler" objects that make up the initial grid... import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.ComponentOrientation; import java.awt.Dimension; ...


5

I'm a bit confused by your c.fill = VERTICAL, I'd have assumed BOTH. Apart from that, the board will have square fields if the window is square, and oblong fields if the window is oblong. Gridwidth and grigheight are completely irrelevant here. Instead you'd use these if you want to have objects whose area overlaps on one of the axes. It's best to consider a ...


4

Your problem looks to be mainly one of your not using layout managers and instead relying on null layouts and setBounds(...). Again, this makes for some extremely brittle GUI's, that are very hard to enhance, debug, or change. Instead, why not let the layout managers do the heavy lifting for you? If this were my GUI, I'd make the overall GUI (the JFrame's ...


4

Two things, first, reset the gridheight after you've used it c.gridwidth = 1; c.gridx = 3; c.gridheight = 2; c.ipady = 26; subpanel.add(bplus, c); c.fill = GridBagConstraints.HORIZONTAL; c.gridwidth = 1; c.ipady = 0; c.gridx = 0; c.gridy = 4; // Still using the gridheight of 2... subpanel.add(bcancel, c); Should be more like... c.fill = ...


3

Put the JPanel with GridLayout into a JScrollPane. E.G. as seen with the two column GridLayout that displays the labels added to the nested layout example.


3

The combination of BorderLayout , GirdLayout and BoxLayout can do this for you(Actually it's not the only choice). Here is the code: import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.GridLayout; import javax.swing.Box; import javax.swing.BoxLayout; import javax.swing.ImageIcon; import javax.swing.JButton; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.JLabel; ...


3

Any idea's on what's causing this? This is the default behaviour of BorderLayout. The component at the CENTER position will occupy the maximum amount of space the is available from the parent component, when the other (NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST) positions have been taken into account Depending on what you are trying to achieve you might consider ...


3

You could simply use GridBagLayout (although MigLayout might worth a look as well)... setLayout(new GridLayout()); GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints(); gbc.gridx = 0; gbc.gridy = 0; for (int index = 0; index < 10; index++) { gbc.anchor = GridBagConstraints .EAST; gbc.gridx = 0; add(new JLabel("Label " + index), gbc); ...


3

Don't use setBounds() or setPreferredSize(). Each Swing component should determine its own preferred size and the layout manager will then position the components based on the rules of the layout manager. Don't use setVisible(true) on all your Swing components (except for the JFrame). By default Swing components are visible. You should add all the ...


3

This design looks for me to fit the BorderLayout, where in the NORTH you have the values that changes the CENTER you have the main part, and the SOUTH you have the buttons. Link to the Oracle Border Layout You can apply this BorderLayout to the JFrame, then create 3 JPanels for each of the NORTH,CENTER and SOUTH sections. If you want to use responsive ...


3

A JPanel uses FlowLayout by default. Calls to setBounds() and using a LayoutManager are mutually exclusive. You either use a LayoutManager (overriding any setBounds() you do) or you use no LayoutManager (setLayout(null)) and setBounds(). The preferred way is to use a LayoutManager. Learn how here ...


3

I write my own layout because existing layout manager don't meet my requirements Right idea, but your implementation is incorrect. The fact that you need to provide the x/y values means you are not using a layout manager but just hardcoding some values. Instead you need to provide information to the layout manager to define the parameters of the ...


3

I think you are not aware that a GridBagLayout works with a Grid NxM which means that all components in the same column have cells of the same width, and all components in the same row reside in cells of the same height. It's just a grid. The problem is very simple, you have a some of components in the column 0: the "Enter Date:" Label, the input date ...


3

I will try to show you one way to get a board like this: by only using the FlowLayout and the GridLayout the first thing you need is a JPanel that will contain the board. You can put it in the center of your Frame with the BorderLayout if you want to. ---------------------- | | | | | | | ...


2

Use Swing components instead of AWT components (Label → JLabel; TextField → JTextField, ...) Don't use a null layout manager (setLayout(null)) and setBounds(). Examine Using Layout Managers. Instead of setSize(w, h) use pack() method. full name is not displayed Because you use setBounds() and null layout. matchCase.setBounds(10, 10 + label_h + 10, ...


2

The point of using a CardLayout is that the panel all occupy the same space and only one panel can be displayed at a time. If you want multiple panels to be visible, then you need to use a different layout manager that displays the multiple child panels in a parent panel. Read the section from the Swing tutorial on Using Layout Managers for more ...


2

I'd like to use the combination of BorderLayout and BoxLayout. BorderLayout let me put the component based on their relative location's relation and BoxLayout let me manage the subtle distance ( create some white space). You can use component.setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(top, left, bottom, right)); to achieve this goal too. Here is a demo and ...


2

Layout management is a very complex problem, I don't think people really appreciate just how complex it really is. No one layout is ever going to achieve everything your want, in most cases, you will need to resort to two or more layouts, especially as your requirements become more complex. For example, the following is simply a BorderLayout at the base ...


2

"Weight" is how much extra place takes the component. "Fill" is whether the component must fill the extra place or not (should the component be expanded to fill the whole place or not). If it should not fill the extra place you can use "anchor" to determine the position of component (left-bounded, right-bounded, centered)


2

Use a BoxLayout or (easier) GridBagLayout for the bottom area, as seen in this answer.


2

When all else fails, write it your self... This uses a custom layout manager which defines a "basic" grid but allows components in a given row to expand into portions of the following column(s)... The default cell size is defined by the largest width/height of the available components that doesn't expand beyond it's own column, makes things a little more ...


2

For the reasons mentioned here, don't use setSize() this way. Instead, let each component adopt it's preferred size and pack() the enclosing Window. In this case, add each button to a panel having the default FlowLayout, which respects preferred size, as shown here.


2

You should avoid using null layouts. You can achieve the same (or a ver aproximate) UI by using layout managers. As I pointed in this comment. Here's a MCVE which I recommend you to do in further questions. Also look at How to ask guide in order to make better questions. I made a new class because trying to modify yours was more work than this. Copy-paste ...


2

If you want the JSrollBar to scroll the JPanel with the gridlayout, then put the grid layout into a scrollpane (remember to extend the scrollable interface) Read this page of the tutorial to learn how to. IF you want to use the events from the JScrollBar to change the visible area of your panel then put the panel inside another panel with a JScrollbar on ...


2

Try this : public class Main{ private JFrame f; private JLabel l1, l2, l3,l4; private JPanel p1, p2, p3; private JButton b1, b2, b3; public Main(){ this.f = new JFrame(); this.f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE); this.f.setLayout(new GridLayout(3,1)); this.p1 = new JPanel(); ...


2

The behaviour you describing as not natural to FlowLayout is indeed, the actual way how FlowLayout works. By default FlowLayout adds component right in the top middle of the Container, as you try to add more components, it shifts the previous added components to the left side, but as the row is filled, it move the new components to the next row, again ...


2

First of all - there is nothing bad in using your own component as content pane. But default content pane is also a JPanel instance so there is actually no point to replace it with your own panel, unless you want to use non-panel content pane or customized panel component. This is how the default content pane looks like: /** * Called by the constructor ...


2

This is usually due to your not setting weightx and weighty constraints. Try: gbc.gridx = x; gbc.gridy = y; gbc.gridwidth = w; gbc.gridheight = h; // **** add here: gbc.weightx = 1.0; gbc.weighty = 1.0; This will allow your GUI to expand in the x and y directions if need be.


2

The layout manager (BoxLayout) is using the preferred size of the components of the container it is managing. By default, the preferred size of a empty JPanel is 0x0, adding in the border has produced a preferred size closer to 2x2 When using layout managers, calling setSize is meaningless, as the layout manager will override anything you specify when the ...



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