Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

just for my enjoy, fun, note have to notify (deepest child required override for min/max/preferredsize from) parent JPanel after LayoutManager is switched back from GridLayout to BorderLayout (unwanted output to see in figure 5th.) . . . . . . from . import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import ...


6

Setting a component's position via setBounds(...) only works for null layouts, i.e., container.setLayout(null);` but regardless of this, I'm going suggest that you not do this as this makes for very inflexible GUI's that while they might look good on one platform look terrible on most other platforms or screen resolutions and that are very difficult to ...


4

I think you forgot to set the constraints when you are adding your custom panel and thus the behavior is unpredictable (or at least unexpected): gbc.gridwidth = 1; cp.add(new JButton("W"), gbc); cp.add(new JScrollPane(new SO26736343())); // gbc missing here If you want this panel fill all available space, then set both weightx and weighty ...


4

frame.add(new JPanelNumber1(), BorderLayout.LINE_START); frame.add(new JPanelNumber2(), BorderLayout.PAGE_END); frame.add(new JPanelNumber3(), BorderLayout.LINE_END); frame.add(new JPanelNumber4(), BorderLayout.CENTER);


4

You could use a GridBagLayout, for example... GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints(); gbc.gridx = 0; gbc.gridy = 0; gbc.anchor = GridBagConstraints.WEST; add(shrished, gbc); gbc.gridx++; gbc.weightx = 1; add(shrishing, gbc); "Wow", you say, "that looks complicated, why would I want to do that when other methods look easier"...good question, ...


4

..so both the labels are aligned to the left Put it in a panel with layout: new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.LEFT) Or (localized) new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.LEADING)


4

I think you forget to setLayout, it works fine when I do. Don't use setBounds and put it in a javalearning constructor and I also suggest you setDefaultCloseOperation like public javalearning() { FlowLayout f = new FlowLayout(); this.setLayout(f); this.setSize(600, 600); this.setTitle("this is a tittle"); ...


4

You never set the layout manager (FlowLayout) to the frame, therefore the JFrame is still using it's default layout manager of BorderLayout... Try using something more like... FlowLayout f = new FlowLayout(); setLayout(f); this.setTitle("this is a tittle"); JButton button = new JButton(); button.setText("Button"); this.add(button); this.pack(); ...


3

Add a panel to the CENTER. Give the panel a layout that does not stretch component sizes (e.g FlowLayout). Add the text field to the flow layout.


3

I would set no absolute sizes. Since you want an empty border around the login fields, I'd do that by nesting JPanels. I also like creating a utility method (which should be static I suppose since it does not change class state) to help me create my GridBagConstraints, something like... import java.awt.Dialog.ModalityType; import java.awt.Font; import ...


3

BoxLayout is designed to distribute unused space among components; struts, glue and filler won't change this. You can use the approach suggested here and here to alter the preferred size of the enclosing scroll pane. More generally, you can implement the scrollable interface. In addition, Swing GUI objects should be constructed and manipulated only on the ...


3

This won't work: public void switchCard(){ contentPanel.setLayout(new CardLayout()); CardLayout cl = (CardLayout) contentPanel.getLayout(); cl.show(contentPanel, PLAY_ID); } because you're changing the layout from the original one, the one that holds all the data. Instead, don't set the contentPane's layout but use the one already there. ...


3

The problem is you add both the button and label after the top-level container (window) is made visible. Thus the components hierarchy must be revalidated in order to make the components visible as well: pan.add(lab); pan.add(but); pan.revalidate(); pan.repaint(); As per Container#add(Component comp) documentation: This method changes layout-related ...


3

Nest two BorderLayout using JPanels. The outer one has the two side JPanels and the center "column" JPanel that holds three JPanels. Then this center column JPanel uses BorderLayout and holds the top, bottom and center JPanels. e.g., import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.Dimension; import javax.swing.*; public class MyLayouts { private ...


3

Ok, it took me a while because I am really not familiar with your mother tongue (it would be much simpler for everyone if you posted your code with english names for variables), but the problem comes from here: aufgabeBeschreibungPanel.setLayout(new BoxLayout(aufgabeBeschreibungLabel, BoxLayout.LINE_AXIS)); Your setting a BoxLayout on ...


3

You need to call the validate method on the frame object after adding subcomponents to it. The validate method is used to cause a container to lay out its subcomponents again. It should be invoked when this container's subcomponents are modified (added to or removed from the container, or layout-related information changed) after the container has been ...


3

Honestly, setAlignmentX probably isn't going to do much for your, setHorizontalAlignment would be a better choice, but having said that, there are other things you can do with the GridBagConstraints To start with, you could use the anchor and weightx properties... phyConstraint.anchor = GridBagConstraints.WEST; phyConstraint.weightx = 1; The anchor will ...


3

JFrame with a BorderLayout, onto that, add a JPanel with a GridBagLayout. Add your other two panels onto this. See Laying Out Components Within a Container and How to Use GridBagLayout for more details import java.awt.Color; import java.awt.Dimension; import java.awt.EventQueue; import java.awt.GridBagConstraints; import java.awt.GridBagLayout; import ...


3

There are two basic issues (as I see it)... One, you are trying to manage a complex layout within a single layout manager, which is pretty hard at the best of times. Two, you don't seem to understand what the layout manager will do when it the available size of the component drops below it's preferred size, which is, in the case of GridBagLayout, revert to ...


3

It would be simpler to just use a BorderLayout, but otherwise, your problem is that you don't set weighty to a positive value for your second component. Here is a small snippet that illustrates both options and allowing you to switch from to another. import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.GridBagConstraints; import java.awt.GridBagLayout; import ...


3

You have a problem here in the JPanel view that you add to your JScrollPane: informations.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(767,461)); This limits the size of the JPanel, no matter what its contents are. Don't do this. Instead, let the JPanel get larger as you add more components to it. If you need to set the preferred size of anything (kleo forgive me), it ...


2

Always call setVisible(true); last, after you have created your UI JFrame uses a BorderLayout as it's default layout, so using mainp.add(p) and then mainp.add(p2) will hide p, as only p2 will be laid out... Don't extend from JFrame (especially since you've already got an instance field of JFrame), this only makes it more confusing... Have a read through ...


2

Don't override paint(). There is rarely ever a reason to do this and I can't think of any reason for having an empty method. An empty method is bound to cause problems I'm using it later in my program for painting stuff Still don't override paint(). Custom painting is done by overriding the paintComponent(...) method of a JPanel (or JComponent) and ...


2

I'd nest layouts. import java.awt.*; import javax.swing.*; import javax.swing.border.EmptyBorder; import javax.swing.border.TitledBorder; public class ThreeButtonTextFieldCombo { private JPanel ui = null; ThreeButtonTextFieldCombo() { initUI(); } public final void initUI() { if (ui!=null) return; ui = new ...


2

Use this in your constructor. If you need to know more about spacing, look into Insets from here jPanelC = new JPanel(); jlabel1 = new JLabel("User ID"); jlabel2 = new JLabel("Password"); jid = new JTextField(15); // jid.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(100, 100)); jpass = new JPasswordField(15); // jpass.setPreferredSize(new ...


2

You need a call to fra.setVisible(true); after you add the visible elements to the content pane.


2

there are several aspects to GridBagLayout (GBL) that get missed by first time users. 1) components placed inside the GBL will initialize at their "preferred" size. JPanel, iirc, has a preferred size of 1x1. 2) if you want the GBL cells to resize according to the enclosing container, you need to give them a weightx and weighty. what those two attributes ...


2

Problems with your LayoutManager's. Use BorderLayout for jpanel2 as suggested by MadProgrammer, for resizing JScrollPane inside jpanel2. With c.fill=BOTH you need to use c.weightx = 1;c.weighty = 1; to specify how much additional space need grab by component. Read more. Here is example: import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.GridBagConstraints; ...


2

It is a wizard of sorts, but the path they take through the wizard will change depending on options they choose, in this case there is a change in the screen depending on whether the user is importing or exporting data with the wizard. Well in this case I think an approach like described in this article it's a better design choice than adding ...


2

A component can only reside within a single container. Each time you add the component to another container, it is first (effectively) removed from it's current parent. You can't re-use empty the way you are. CardLayout can not manage multiple containers, it is responsible for the management of a single container. My "gut" feeling would be to create a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible