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15

You are applying foldr with an strict combination function to an infinite list. Boiled down to a minimal example, you can view this behaviour here: *Main> :t const const :: a -> b -> a *Main> :t flip seq flip seq :: c -> a -> c *Main> foldr1 const [0..] 0 *Main> foldr1 (flip seq) [0..] ^CInterrupted. The fix is, as explained in ...


10

The difference is that pattern matching forces the first item in the spine, head/tail do not. You could use lazy patterns to achieve the same goal: interleave (x:xs) ~(y:ys) = x : y : interleave xs ys Note the ~: this is equivalent to defining y and ys using head and tail. For example: the list below is undefined. fix (\ (x:xs) -> 1:x:xs) where ...


7

What is happening is that when you've specified x to have the type Num a => a, the compiler can't possibly know which instance of Num to use when performing 1 + 1. What it does instead is use defaulting. GHC defines default types for certain typeclasses so that when there's no possible way to determine what concrete type to use it can still give ...


7

I'd definitely go with the second, because it's obviously efficient and plenty clear enough. The first will depend on whether genericReplicate is able to fuse with ++ in some fashion. The best way to find out for sure is to run ghc -O2 -ddump-simpl -dsuppress-all whatever.hs | less and pore over what it spews. That said, the entire length of a cycle ...


5

This might make more sense if you were to do something like > Just x <- timeout 1000 $ evalRandIO f > :t x x :: Bool > x Interrupted. The computation itself is completing, namely it's reaching WHNF, so timeout does not catch it. The timeout 1000 function itself completes and returns Just undefined. An example where you can get timeout to ...


5

I put up a Gist of a solution. The tricky bit is: type 's l = 's Lazy.t type ('a, 's) st = 's -> ('a * 's l) let bind (mx : ('a, 's) st) (f : ('a -> ('b, 's) st)) (s : 's l) : ('b * 's l) = (* conceptually we want let rec (lazy (y, s'')) = lazy (mx s') and (lazy (z, s')) = lazy (f y s) in (force z, s'') but ...


4

The problem here is not so much about the pattern matching or using head and tail. The issue is how it's done, by defining your function as interleave :: [a] -> [a] -> [a] interleave (x:xs) (y:ys) = x : y : interleave xs ys interleave _ _ = [] You're strictly pattern matching your arguments, that is, we need to know that they are lists ...


4

Here, the lazy val toMap is an internal variable for the function. It is not preserved between the function calls. This might be a better example (we have lazy val as a class member, and we can demonstrate that it's only evaluated once): case class LazyMapDemo(aparam : Array[(String, String)]) { lazy val toMap = processMap(aparam) def giveLazyMap = ...


2

You're right that the image content isn't actually computed until it's time to display it. You can use freeze, which converts the image into a bitmap, if you need to compute it ahead of time. In your example, try changing the definition of flipped to the following: (define flipped (map (compose1 freeze flip-horizontal) images))


2

To evaluate result, it seems to me that name is going to be "evaluated" for each element of the sequence 1 to 1000. This is not true. lazy val means that before you invoke it the first time, name is not evaluated. After the first call, it will evaluate its definition and be fully defined, then other calls use the already defined function. You could ...


2

After inspecting the code of writeFile, it seems that it depends on the hPut function of Data.ByteString.Lazy: -- | Outputs a 'ByteString' to the specified 'Handle'. -- hPut :: Handle -> ByteString -> IO () hPut h cs = foldrChunks (\c rest -> S.hPut h c >> rest) (return ()) cs hPut constructs the IO action that will print the lazy ...


2

It appears that timeout just executes the action in a certain amount of time without evaluating the result. It does not evaluate the resulting insides. That is okay. If we use (>>= (return $!)) :: Monad m => m a -> m a As you know, return creates a value of type m a. By doing return $!, we are saying that we won't make m a, and therefore ...


1

Huh. That is an odd little type there. Maybe this? instance NFData A where rnf (A !runA) = () strictify :: A -> A strictify (A !runA) = A $ \a i -> strictify a `deepSeq` i `deepSeq` runA a i testTimeout x = timeout 1000 . evalRandIO $! runA x' x' 0 where x' = strictify x That might even be "too strict" and redundantly strict, not sure.


1

your failure can be much simplified: var innerCounter = 0 val proxy = (x: Int) => { innerCounter += 1; x } Stream(0).map(k => proxy(100)) assert(innerCounter == 0) I'm taking into account that your select function is nothing more than map. map/flatMap for a Stream will strictly evaluate the head of the stream but not the tail of the stream when the ...


1

You can use SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS in combination with FOUND_ROWS to get the count of all rows without LIMIT clause: FOUND_ROWS() A SELECT statement may include a LIMIT clause to restrict the number of rows the server returns to the client. In some cases, it is desirable to know how many rows the statement would have returned without the LIMIT, ...


1

I think this is the first problem: Public Function GetMethods(ByVal Assembly As String, ByVal TypeName As String) 'As List(Of MethodDef) Specify the return type and it may work: As LazyList(Of MethodDef) This will also happen when the TypeName is not found in the Assembly. In that case, your LazyList will still be Nothing and ...


1

to_json does not process enumerators. It only dumps its string notation: > [].to_enum.to_json => "\"#<Enumerator:0x00000002503190>\"" You need to convert your enumerator to an array first: > z.to_a.to_json => "[{\"x\":5},2,3]" To clarify further, the array has its own generator module: > [].method(:to_json).owner => ...


1

Here's a pretty brief lazy-decorator, though it lacks using @functools.wraps (and actually returns an instance of Lazy plus some other potential pitfalls): class Lazy(object): def __init__(self, calculate_function): self._calculate = calculate_function def __get__(self, obj, _=None): if obj is None: return self ...


1

Here's one solution: have Python spawn a process, run the function on one file, then exit. The parent proc will collect results from each of the files. This is in no way graceful, but if LocalAudioFile refuses to be dislodged from memory, it allows some flexibility in getting results. This code runs runs a function on each Python file in the current ...



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