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1

Yes, in theory you have to link your libusb as well. But there are tools like libtool which can automate the third level library dependency linking. So libtool will link libusb automatically when you link your mylib.so Refer http://www.gnu.org/software/libtool/manual/html_node/Inter_002dlibrary-dependencies.html


0

#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> //gcc -ggdb -o test test.c -Wl,-wrap,malloc void* __real_malloc(size_t bytes); int main() { int *p = NULL; int i = 0; p = malloc(100*sizeof(int)); for (i=0; i < 100; i++) p[i] = i; free(p); return 0; } void* __wrap_malloc(size_t bytes) { return __real_malloc(bytes); } ...


0

uninstalled all the jpeg versions (both 62 and 80), and reinstalled jpeg8 by using sudo apt-get install libjpeg8


0

you can use a .cmd file with following content ::source code file path set src_path=source.cpp ::output file path set bin_path=yourlib.dll ::library you need set libs=-lmingw32 -lkernel32 -lshell32 -luser32 -lwsock32 -lws2_32 -lole32 -loleaut32 ::windows subsystem set sub_sys=-mwindows ::cpp version used by g++ set cpp_ver=-std=c++1y ::jump to g++ ...


0

Looks like your program need zlib, but c:/Strawberry/c/bin/../lib/gcc/x86_64 -w64-mingw32/4.8.3/../../..//libz.a is not valid (different target architecture - x86 vs x86_64?). You need to get a real zlib, compile for the same architecture and point your program to it.


2

Glibc is not linked statically (much as we might have liked to, it goes out of its way to prevent this). As a result, the system libraries (libstd and such) are always dependent on the glibc version on which they were built. This is why the buildbots in the linux cluster mozilla uses are/were old versions of centos. See ...


0

Your solution won't work with shared libraries. But you can do something like this: Put the following code in a file called malloc.c #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> void *__libc_malloc(size_t size); void *malloc(size_t size) { printf("malloc'ing %zu bytes\n", size); return __libc_malloc(size); } Compile malloc.c: gcc ...


1

Sounds like you want a "linker map". The ld(1) option is "--print-map". But calling through GCC you'll probably have to do something like: gcc -Wl,--print-map -o a.out c.c It comes out the standard output and looks pretty complete.


0

In the linker script add *(.bss) to the data section instead of the .bss section.


0

Functions can only have internal or external linkage. If you want to use different modules, your functions need to have external linkage so they can be called from one translation unit to the other. You can use an external function pointer to a static function but of course this will still allow the other modules to call the function through the function ...


5

With standard C you can only either export the function or not, there is no “export only to these files” option. So basically you would have to move bar() to foo.c and declare it as static. If you wish to keep the file separate, an ugly hack would be to #include it from foo.c (and not compile bar.o)… With tools outside the scope of standard C you can remove ...


0

When compiling/linking 32-bit apps on x86_64, setting emulation to elf_i386 provides the correct elf format. So, for example, if you compile an assembler app with nasm -f elf file.asm -o file.o, the link command is ld -m elf_i386 -o exename file.o Courtesy: David


3

You're running into kernel limitations on where pages can be mapped by userspace applications; these restrictions are intended to prevent certain kernel exploits from working. The minimum mappable address is set by the vm.mmap_min_addr sysctl value, and is usually at least 4096 (i.e, 0x1000). For details, see: https://wiki.debian.org/mmap_min_addr (The ...


0

It turns out that dsymutil does not work well (or at all) with static libraries. Using ar -x to extract the .o files and then using dsymutil on them appears to work, and thus solve my issue


0

The solution that comes to my mind -- is to use environment per-package modification via package.env. In problem package libtool is used, which invokes gcc as linker, so the thing is needed to add is -Wl,-fuse-ld=bfd (on link-stage, LDFLAGS). So, full solution is: mkdir -p /etc/portage/env ...


1

This problem can be solved by changing the environment paths. The environment variables are set in /etc directory. Moving in it, there is a file named environment in which all paths are mentioned like this: PATH="/usr/local/sbin:/usr/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games:/usr/local/games" we need to add a path which is /usr/bin in the list, as ...


0

My initial guess (in the updated question) was wrong. pod ... install created a new MyProject.xcworkspace\ as sibling to Podfile, not modify the one in the current directory. I had assumed the second by mistake. These steps worked: move MyProject.xcworkspace/ down from its original location run pod install in the new location move MyProject.xcworkspace/ ...


0

Inside GNU LD source, there is ldgram.y: A YACC grammar to parse a superset of the AT&T linker scripting language. Copyright (C) 1991-2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc. Written by Steve Chamberlain of Cygnus Support (steve@cygnus.com). See also ld/Makefile.am for the source files that make up LD: ld_new_SOURCES = ldgram.y ldlex-wrapper.c lexsup.c ...


1

Here is how you can do it: cat t.c #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { printf("Hello\n"); return 0; } gcc -g t.c gdb -q --args /usr/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 ./a.out (gdb) start Function "main" not defined. Starting program: /usr/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 ./a.out Hello [Inferior 1 (process 7134) exited normally] So far ...


2

As by C Standard, the hosted environment (that I guess is your case as/if you want to use standard library headers*) forces you to keep with main function. From C11 §5.1.2.2.1/p1 (emphasis mine): The function called at program startup is named main. The implementation declares no prototype for this function. It shall be defined with a return type of ...


0

The answer: remove -static. The option forces only static libraries (no shared libs) and as I wanted to link in two shared libraries it made the binary unusable. Also I don't even think -static is valid for executable files.


1

It's looks like Xcode doesn't link your library in the "Build phases". These is the steps to do in order to fix it: TargetSettings -> Build Phases -> Compile Sources -> add your ZBarReaderView.m class (and others if necessary) -> Build and Run


0

Answer for future consultation: What solved my issue in the end was starting from scratch and installing my dependencies via Cocoapods. It appears if you try to add a framework via a drag and drop and then later user= Cocoapods the previous framework will not be noticed by Cocoapods and Cocoapods will attempt to install that very same framework again. So ...


0

Well, I kind of left it for a while, and came back to it now. It worked for some reason. The only thing I can think of is that I upgraded from GHC 7.8.3 to 7.8.4. If anyone comes up with this again, try a different version of GHC.


1

The .so file is built in libusb/.libs/ Its not very obvious by looking at the build logs though.


0

I found the problem, I selected the wrong toolchain: linux gcc instead of cross gcc.


0

You are intercepting exit by your own function. What the real exit function is designed to do is not being done by your __wrap_exit function. You should change the implementation of __wrap_exit to do what you need to do, and then call the real exit. void __wrap_exit(int code) { // Add your own code, if that is useful. __real_exit(code); return; }


1

I guess that you want to build a 32-bit program on a 64-bit operating system. You have to tell assembler and linker about that circumstance: as --32 -o power.o power.s ld -m elf_i386 -o power power.o Run it with ./power.



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