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30

Here is Dependency Walker. http://dependencywalker.com/


30

This is a bit of a kluge, but it's the best solution I could find, and it really works quite well for basic use - just save this script as "arm-none-linux-gnueabi-ldd" with your other cross tools. #!/bin/sh arm-none-linux-gnueabi-readelf -a $1 | grep "Shared library:"


25

I think that the version of libc with debug symbols is in /usr/lib/debug/lib. I tried setting my LD_LIBRARY_PATH variable to have this at the front of the path but that did not seem to make a difference. These are not the droids you are looking for. The libraries in /usr/lib/debug are not real libraries. Rather, the contain only debug info, but do not ...


16

The library cannot be found. Libraries are by default looked for in /lib, /usr/lib and the directories specified by /etc/ld.so.conf. Usually system libraries (like boost, if you installed it via your package manager) are located in /usr/lib, but it's probably not your case. Where are your boost libraries located on your system? Did you compile them by ...


15

I see many interesting details but no direct answer to the question asked. The 'hierarchical' version of ldd is lddtree (from app-misc/pax-utils): $ lddtree /usr/bin/xmllint xmllint => /usr/bin/xmllint (interpreter => /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2) libreadline.so.6 => /lib64/libreadline.so.6 libncurses.so.5 => /lib64/libncurses.so.5 ...


14

or the GNU tool : i586-mingw32msvc-objdump -p *.exe | grep 'DLL Name:'


12

Fedora uses address space randomization as part of its various security measures. ldd works by actually loading the shared objects and showing where they end up. Putting the two together results in the given observations.


12

You can see which paths are coming from where by running LD_DEBUG=libs ldd ./libphp5.so Are these dependency filenames and paths (/usr/lib/mysql/libmysqlclient.so.16) baked into the shared library binary? The filename almost certainly is. The path usually isn't. You can see what is baked into the binary with readelf -d ./libphp5.so Look for ...


11

It depends on what exactly is meant by "detect library dependencies". The ldd command works on shared libraries, not just on executables. It will display the dependencies of a shared library declared when the library was built: $ ldd /usr/lib/libgtk-3.so linux-vdso.so.1 (0x00007ffff8fff000) libgdk-3.so.0 => /usr/lib/libgdk-3.so.0 ...


10

I hope that you're not asking about the main entries, which are stating that for the requested library libm.so.6 it was found in the file /lib/libm.so.6, for example, but are asking about the two outliers. Why are they displayed differently? for linux-gate.so.1 it's because it's not actually a file on-disk - it's exposed by the kernel as the mechanism for ...


9

If you are running Portage≥2.2 with FEATURES=preserve-libs, you should rarely ever need revdep-rebuild anymore as old .so.vers will be preserved as needed (though you still need to rebuild carefully, as stuff still goes kaboom when libA.so.0 wants libC.so.0 and libB.so.0 wants libC.so.1 and some binary wants both libA.so.0 and libB.so.0). That being ...


8

It is recorded inside application binary itself (specified at compile time, more exactly at link step, done with ld): $ readelf -d /bin/echo Dynamic section at offset 0x5f1c contains 21 entries: Tag Type Name/Value 0x00000001 (NEEDED) Shared library: [libc.so.6] ... (there are some additional columns ...


8

The dumpbin command can be useful for many things, although in this case dependency walker is probably a little more verbose. dumpbin /dependents some.dll


7

I know that this is an old one, but you can run ldconfig to rebuild your ld cache. That way you don't need to update LD_LIBRARY_PATH.


7

As per ld.so(8), setting the environment variable LD_TRACE_LOADED_OBJECTS to a non-empty string will give ldd-like results (instead of executing the binary or library normally). setenv("LD_TRACE_LOADED_OBJECTS", "1", 1); FILE *ldd = popen("/lib/libz.so");


7

The binaries I had were looking for the 32-bit versions of the shared libraries, I had the 64-bit installed. Stupid mistake. LDD didn't produce a very insightful error message, but the binary did when I tried to run it.


6

You can see the difference in the output. objdump is simply dumping what the object itself lists as libraries containing unresolved symbols. ldd is listing which libraries ld.so would actually load. And it follows the graph backward, so that you can see what would be loaded by those libraries. Which is how libpthread.so.0 winds up in the ldd output, ...


6

You could also use objdump and in order to just dump and search the header fraction of the binary. This may save you some milliseconds... #!/bin/sh arm-none-linux-gnueabi-objdump -x $1 | grep NEEDED


6

Did you export LD_LIBRARY_PATH? the export keyword tells Bash to send any variables to subprocesses - otherwise ldd will never see LD_LIBRARY_PATH.


6

You shouldn't need to parse /etc/ld.so.conf or any of the config files - if you run 'ldconfig', it will scan the configured directories and generate a cache file. Then, subsequently when you attempt a dlopen it'll automatically find the files by iterating through the cached library directories. Same thing with compiling and giving -lSomeLib, you shouldn't ...


5

Using ldd: $ ldd DivFix++


5

You can use the ldd command which prints the shared library dependencies: ldd DivFix++


5

Actually ldd gives you absolute path with filename of whatever from your application's shared library dependencies it's able to find. $ ldd v8test linux-gate.so.1 => (0xb78b2000) libz.so.1 => /usr/lib/libz.so.1 (0xb787e000) librt.so.1 => /lib/i686/cmov/librt.so.1 (0xb7875000) libcppunit-1.12.so.1 => ...


5

There is now an ldd in Cygwin. If you have a very old Cygwin version, you will have to use cygcheck.


5

If you want to know the library files a program have opened, you can try pmap. For example, if we want to know the libraries that bash process 3860 have opened, the result could be: 3860: bash 08048000 880K r-x-- /bin/bash 08124000 4K r---- /bin/bash 08125000 20K rw--- /bin/bash 0812a000 20K rw--- [ anon ] 099ae000 348K rw--- [ ...


5

The most important part of that output is linux-vdso. VDSO stands for Virtual Dynamic Shared Object (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VDSO) it's an way to export kernel space routines to userspace. The main reason is to reduce the system call overhead. Typically when a system call happens it requires some expensive operations like switching mode from user to ...


5

You can use the -rpath from the linker (using ld as the linker). From its manual page: -rpath=dir Add a directory to the runtime library search path. This is used when linking an ELF executable with shared objects. All -rpath arguments are concatenated and passed to the runtime linker, which uses them to locate shared objects at runtime. The ...


4

Thanks to android developers. My feature request was implemented :) Now we have ndk-depends, a tool that allows to troubleshoot dependencies. Edit: it doesn't do full symbol resolution though. E.g. if you build against Android-14 and try to use methods that didn't exist in old Androids, then this tool won't list missing symbols. This part was left as a TODO ...


4

If user756235 can run it under gdb then this is an approach using this and this. The only question is to make a full list of functions in a shared library X: nm ./libX.so | grep "T " And then create .gdbinit (in my case I control args of print_in_lib): host: srv2-x64rh5-01, OS: Linux 2.6.18-238.el5>more .gdbinit file main set pagination off set logging ...


4

When you build the shared libraries, add "-Wl,-soname=libtoaster.so.1" to the gcc flags (assuming you are linking with gcc). This sets DT_SONAME in the library, and will force any application linked against that library to have the name of the library taken from the DT_SONAME, rather than from the name of the file. [vps@manticore]~/cprog/toaster1$ gcc -c ...



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