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723

Actually, this is not a design flaw, and it is not because of internals, or performance. It comes simply from the fact that functions in Python are first-class objects, and not only a piece of code. As soon as you get to think into this way, then it completely makes sense: a function is an object being evaluated on its definition; default parameters are ...


99

Suppose you have the following code fruits = ("apples", "bananas", "loganberries") def eat(food=fruits): ... When I see the declaration of eat, the least astonishing thing is to think that if the first parameter is not given, that it will be equal to the tuple ("apples", "bananas", "loganberries") However, supposed later on in the code, I do ...


70

AFAICS no one has yet posted the relevant part of the documentation: Default parameter values are evaluated when the function definition is executed. This means that the expression is evaluated once, when the function is defined, and that the same “pre-computed” value is used for each call. This is especially important to understand when a default ...


44

I know nothing about the Python interpreter inner workings (and I'm not an expert in compilers and interpreters either) so don't blame me if I propose anything unsensible or impossible. Provided that python objects are mutable I think that this should be taken into account when designing the default arguments stuff. When you instantiate a list: a = [] ...


34

Well, the reason is quite simply that bindings are done when code is executed, and the function definition is executed, well... when the functions is defined. Compare this: class BananaBunch: bananas = [] def addBanana(self, banana): self.bananas.append(banana) This code suffers from the exact same unexpected happenstance. bananas is a ...


22

I used to think that creating the objects at runtime would be the better approach. I'm less certain now, since you do lose some useful features, though it may be worth it regardless simply to prevent newbie confusion. The disadvantages of doing so are: 1. Performance def foo(arg=something_expensive_to_compute())): ... If call-time evaluation is ...


21

This behavior is easy explained by: function (class etc.) declaration is executed only once, creating all default value objects everything is passed by reference So: def x(a=0, b=[], c=[], d=0): a = a + 1 b = b + [1] c.append(1) print a, b, c a doesn't change - every assignment call creates new int object - new object is printed b ...


14

What you're asking is why this: def func(a=[], b = 2): pass isn't internally equivalent to this: def func(a=None, b = None): a_default = lambda: [] b_default = lambda: 2 def actual_func(a=None, b=None): if a is None: a = a_default() if b is None: b = b_default() return actual_func func = func() except for the case of ...


14

This actually has nothing to do with default values, other than that it often comes up as an unexpected behaviour when you write functions with mutable default values. >>> def foo(a): a.append(5) print a >>> a = [5] >>> foo(a) [5, 5] >>> foo(a) [5, 5, 5] >>> foo(a) [5, 5, 5, 5] >>> foo(a) [5, ...


13

It's a performance optimization. As a result of this functionality, which of these two function calls do you think is faster? def print_tuple(some_tuple=(1,2,3)): print some_tuple print_tuple() #1 print_tuple((1,2,3)) #2 I'll give you a hint. Here's the disassembly (see http://docs.python.org/library/dis.html): #1 0 LOAD_GLOBAL ...


13

1) The so-called problem of "Mutable Default Argument" is in general a special example demonstrating that: "All functions with this problem suffer also from similar side effect problem on the actual parameter," That is against the rules of functional programming, usually undesiderable and should be fixed both together. Example: def foo(a=[]): ...


10

This behavior is not surprising if you take the following into consideration: The behavior of read-only class attributes upon assignment attempts, and that Functions are objects (explained well in the accepted answer). The role of (2) has been covered extensively in this thread. (1) is likely the astonishment causing factor, as this behavior is not ...


9

You can get round this by replacing the object (and therefore the tie with the scope): def foo(a=[]): a = list(a) a.append(5) return a Ugly, but it works.


9

the shortest answer would probably be "definition is execution", therefore the whole argument makes no strict sense. as a more contrived example, you may cite this: def a(): return [] def b(x=a()): print x hopefully it's enough to show that not executing the default argument expressions at the execution time of the def statement isn't easy or doesn't ...


8

A simple workaround using None >>> def bar(b, data=None): ... data = data or [] ... data.append(b) ... return data ... >>> bar(3) [3] >>> bar(3) [3] >>> bar(3) [3] >>> bar(3, [34]) [34, 3] >>> bar(3, [34]) [34, 3]


7

The solutions here are: Use None as your default value (or a nonce object), and switch on that to create your values at runtime; or Use a lambda as your default parameter, and call it within a try block to get the default value (this is the sort of thing that lambda abstraction is for). The second option is nice because users of the function can pass in ...


5

5 points in defense of Python Simplicity: The behavior is simple in the following sense: Most people fall into this trap only once, not several times. Consistency: Python always passes objects, not names. The default parameter is, obviously, part of the function heading (not the function body). It therefore ought to be evaluated at module load time (and ...


5

As far as I know, there are three reasons for considering it to be a bad practice. It violates the principle of least surprise. Some people assume all ID numbers are non-negative. Some people use negative numbers to indicate errors. The first one has some validity to it. You never see SQL examples or answers on SO that use negative ID numbers. (I'm ...


5

It may be true that: Someone is using every language/library feature, and Switching the behavior here would be ill-advised, but it is entirely consistent to hold to both of the features above and still make another point: It is a confusing feature and it is unfortunate in Python. The other answers, or at least some of them either make points 1 and 2 ...


4

What are other use cases of this, No. what is the rationale for this rather unintuitive implementation? "unintuitive"? Really? I'd disagree. Let's think. "a and b" is falsified if a is false. So the first false value is sufficient to know the answer. Why bother transforming a to another boolean? It's already false. How much more false is ...


4

What are other use cases of this, Conciseness (and therefore clarity, as soon as you get used to it, since after all it does not sacrifice readability at all!-) any time you need to check something and either use that something if it's true, or another value if that something is false (that's for and -- reverse it for or -- and I'm very deliberately ...


4

This "bug" gave me a lot of overtime work hours! But I'm beginning to see a potential use of it (but I would have liked it to be at the execution time, still) I'm gonna give you what I see as a useful example. def example(errors=[]): # statements # Something went wrong mistake = True if mistake: tryToFixIt(errors) # Didn't ...


4

When we do this: def foo(a=[]): ... ... we assign the argument a to an unnamed list, if the caller does not pass the value of a. To make things simpler for this discussion, let's temporarily give the unnamed list a name. How about pavlo ? def foo(a=pavlo): ... At any time, if the caller doesn't tell us what a is, we reuse pavlo. If pavlo is ...


3

I sometimes exploit this behavior as an alternative to the following pattern: singleton = None def use_singleton(): global singleton if singleton is None: singleton = _make_singleton() return singleton.use_me() If singleton is only used by use_singleton, I like the following pattern as a replacement: # _make_singleton() is called ...


3

Already busy topic, but from what I read here, the following helped me realizing how it's working internally: def bar(a=[]): print id(a) a = a + [1] print id(a) return a >>> bar() 4484370232 4484524224 [1] >>> bar() 4484370232 4484524152 [1] >>> bar() 4484370232 # Never change, this is 'class property' of the ...


3

I think the answer to this question lies in how python pass data to parameter (pass by value or by reference), not mutability or how python handle the "def" statement. A brief introduction. First, there are two type of data types in python, one is simple elementary data type, like numbers, and another data type is objects. Second, when passing data to ...


3

It's very subjective, but there are some points to analise: Conflict: Does this backing bean has a name too generic that another component, system or package that can use the same name? Usability: If it is constantly used, has it an easy, not too long and significant name that can be used with readability? Tracking: If I replace the class name in the ...


3

>>> def a(): >>> print "a executed" >>> return [] >>> x =a() a executed >>> def b(m=[]): >>> m.append(5) >>> print m >>> b(x) [5] >>> b(x) [5, 5]


2

From: http://www.network-theory.co.uk/docs/pytut/DefaultArgumentValues.html The default value is evaluated only once. This makes a difference when the default is a mutable object such as a list, dictionary, or instances of most classes. For example, the following function accumulates the arguments passed to it on subsequent calls: def f(a, L=[]): ...


2

Actually there's a Ruby idiom for what you are trying to do: [*args]. * in this context is called the splat operator: http://raflabs.com/blogs/silence-is-foo/2010/08/07/ruby-idioms-what-is-the-splatunary-operator-useful-for/ If you get passed an array, splat will "flatten" the array into the new one, if you pass a single argument, it will become a one ...



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