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21

Logarithmic Least Squares Since we can convert a logarithmic function into a line by taking the log of the x values, we can perform a linear least squares curve fitting. In fact, the work has been done for us and a solution is presented at Math World. In brief, we're given $X and $Y values that are from a distribution like y = a + b * log(x). The least ...


15

the first error indicates that ggplot2 cannot find the variable 'count', which is used in formula, in data. Stats take place after mapping, that is, size -> x, and counts -> y. Here is an example for using nls in geom_smooth: ggplot(data=myhist, aes(x=size, y=counts)) + geom_point() + geom_smooth(method="nls", formula = y ~ N * dnorm(x, m, s), se=F, ...


14

You first need to figure out the coordinates for the base of the perpendicular segments, then call the segments function which can take vectors of coordinates as inputs (no need for a loop). perp.segment.coord <- function(x0, y0, lm.mod){ #finds endpoint for a perpendicular segment from the point (x0,y0) to the line # defined by lm.mod as y=a+b*x a ...


14

The easiest thing to do is to linearlize the problem. You're using a non-linear, iterative method which will be slower than a linear least squares solution. Basically, you have: y = height * exp(-(x - mu)^2 / (2 * sigma^2)) To make this a linear equation, take the (natural) log of both sides: ln(y) = ln(height) - (x - mu)^2 / (2 * sigma^2) This then ...


13

This code worked for me providing that you are only fitting a function that is a combination of two Gaussian distributions. I just made a residuals function that adds two Gaussian functions and then subtracts them from the real data. The parameters (p) that I passed to Numpy's least squares function include: the mean of the first Gaussian function (m), ...


12

Assume you have some data points x = numpy.array([0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0]) y = numpy.array([3.6, 1.3, 0.2, 0.9]) To fit a parabola to those points, use numpy.polyfit(): p = numpy.polyfit(x, y, 2) To get the chi-squared value for this fit, evaluate the polynomial at the x values of your data points, subtract the y values, square and sum: chi_squared = ...


12

I think it would be simpler to use numpy.polyfit, which performs Least squares polynomial fit. This is a simple snippet: import numpy as np x = np.array([0,1,2,3,4,5]) y = np.array([2.1, 2.9, 4.15, 4.98, 5.5, 6]) z = np.polyfit(x, y, 1) p = np.poly1d(z) #plotting import matplotlib.pyplot as plt xp = np.linspace(-1, 6, 100) plt.plot(x, y, '.', xp, p(xp)) ...


11

A rough solution would be to shift the origin for your model to that point and create a model with no intercept nmod <- (lm(I(y-50)~I(x-10) +0, test)) abline(predict(nmod, newdata = list(x=0))+50, coef(nmod), col='red')


11

In short: Your function must be in the form of y=ax+0, which makes polyfit useless. But you can use the least squares method: a = x(:)\y(:); Explanation: You have n equations and one variable a that is needed to be found: a*x1 = y1; a*x2 = y2; ... a*xn = yn; The operator \ finds the least squares solution. Alternatively, you can find the ...


10

Given the between sum of squares betweenss and the vector of within sum of squares for each cluster withinss the formulas are these: totss = tot.withinss + betweenss tot.withinss = sum(withinss) For example, if there were only one cluster then betweenss would be 0, there would be only one component in withinss and totss = tot.withinss = withinss. For ...


9

A is full rank --- so x is 0 Since it looks like you need a least-squares solution, i.e. min ||A*x|| s.t. ||x|| = 1, do the SVD such that [U S V] = svd(A) and the last column of V (assuming that the columns are sorted in order of decreasing singular values) is x. I.e., U = -0.23024 -0.23241 0.28225 -0.59968 -0.04403 -0.67213 ...


8

Yes, of course, there is a weights= option to lm(), the basic linear model fitting function. Quick example: R> df <- data.frame(x=1:10) R> lm(x ~ 1, data=df) ## i.e. the same as mean(df$x) Call: lm(formula = x ~ 1, data = df) Coefficients: (Intercept) 5.5 R> lm(x ~ 1, data=df, weights=seq(0.1, 1.0, by=0.1)) Call: ...


8

You need predict in order to interpolate the predictions between the fitted points. d <- data.frame(x=seq(1,11,by=2), y=c(0.0100,2.3984,11.0256,4.0272,0.2408,0.0200)) lm1 <-lm(y ~ log(x)+x, data=d) lm2 <-lm(y ~ I(x^2)+x, data=d) xvec <- seq(0,12,length=101) plot(d) lines(xvec,predict(lm1,data.frame(x=xvec))) ...


8

ns actually generates a matrix of predictors. What you can do is split that matrix out into individual variables, and feed them to nls. m <- ns(x, df=5) df <- data.frame(y, m) # X-variables will be named X1, ... X5 # starting values should be set as appropriate for your data nls(y ~ theta * plogis(alpha + b1*X1 + b2*X2 + b3*X3 + b4*X4 + b5*X5), ...


8

Intuition A point x on a plane defined by normal n and a point on the plane p obeys: n.(x - p) = 0. If a point y does not lie on the plane, n.(y -p) will not be equal to zero, so a useful way to define a cost is by |n.(y - p)|^2 . This is the squared distance of the point y from the plane. With equal weights, you want to find an n that minimizes the total ...


7

A has 5 rows, and so is D. Both of them have 3 columns. Therefore, you have an overdetermined system of 5 equations with 3 variables. In most of the cases, it means that you cannot solve the equations exactly, because you have too many constraints. Once you do x = A\D; you get the least squares solution. 0.8333 -1.5000 1.6667 What is this ...


7

I will assume here that you want Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind. As far as I know, Matlab does not have this inbuilt. It is easy to code yourself though. Chebyshev polynomials are only defined on [-1,1] so first you must map your x data to this range. Then use the recurrence relation for generating Chebyshev polynomials ...


7

You might want to be more specific when you say 'two-stage-probit-least-squares'. Since you refer to a Stata program that implements this I am guessing you are talking about the CDSIMEQ package, which implements the Amemiya (1978) procedure for the Heckit model (a.k.a Generalized Tobit, a.k.a. Tobit type II model, etc.). As Grant said, systemfit will do a ...


7

I would use bootstrapping method. See here: http://phe.rockefeller.edu/LogletLab/whitepaper/node17.html Simple example for noisy gaussian: x = arange(-10, 10, 0.01) # model function def f(p): mu, s = p return exp(-(x-mu)**2/(2*s**2)) # create error function for dataset def fff(d): def ff(p): return d-f(p) return ff # create ...


7

The models and results instances all have a save and load method, so you don't need to use the pickle module directly. Edit to add an example: import statsmodels.api as sm data = sm.datasets.longley.load_pandas() data.exog['constant'] = 1 results = sm.OLS(data.endog, data.exog).fit() results.save("longley_results.pickle") # we should probably add a ...


6

You can achieve a ~factor of 2 speed up by precomputing the transposition of X. i.e. for x=1:size(picture,2) % second dimension b/c already transposed X = picture(:,x); XX = X'; Y = randn(n_timepoints,1); %B = (X'*X)^-1*X'*Y; ; B = (XX*X)^-1*XX*Y; est(x) = B(1); end Before: Elapsed time is 2.520944 seconds. After: Elapsed time is ...


6

You can use Gaussian mixture models from scikit-learn: from sklearn import mixture import matplotlib.pyplot import matplotlib.mlab import numpy as np clf = mixture.GMM(n_components=2, covariance_type='full') clf.fit(yourdata) m1, m2 = clf.means_ w1, w2 = clf.weights_ c1, c2 = clf.covars_ histdist = matplotlib.pyplot.hist(yourdata, 100, normed=True) ...


6

The nls function does not automatically include coefficients for all of your parameters in the model. You must explicitly include them in the formula. I'm not exactly sure where you wanted p1 and p2 to be included in the model from your description p1 <- 1 p2 <- 0.2 fit <- nls(ydata ~ p1+p2*xdata^2, start=list(p1=p1,p2=p2)) fit # Nonlinear ...


6

The mandatory ggplot2 method: library(ggplot2) qplot(x,y)+stat_smooth(method="lm", formula="y~poly(x,2)", se=FALSE)


6

Have a look at the fastLm() function in the RcppArmadillo package on CRAN. There is also a similar fastLm() in RcppGSL which preceded this -- but you probably want the Armadillo-based solution. I have some slides in older presentations (on HPC with R) that show the speed gains. Also note the hint in the help page about better 'pivoted' approaches than the ...


6

It is much better to first take the logarithm, then use leastsquare to fit to this linear equation, which will give you a much better fit. There is a great example in the scipy cookbook, which I've adapted below to fit your code. The best fits like this are: amplitude = 0.8955, and index = -0.40943265484 As we can see from the graph (and your data), if its ...


6

According to the documentation: “leastsq” is a wrapper around MINPACK’s lmdif and lmder algorithms. So (as @tillsten points out) that’s a Levenberg–Marquardt implementation.


6

under python >= 2.7: >>> l = lambda a, b: None >>> l.func_code.co_argcount 2 or under 2.6: >>> l.__code__.co_argcount 2


5

For what it's worth, I implemented these methods in MATLAB a while ago. However, I did it apparently before I knew about lsqnonlin etc, as it uses a hand-implemented regression. This is probably slow, but may help to compare with your code. function [x, y, r, sq_error] = circFit ( P ) %# CIRCFIT fits a circle to a set of points using least sqaures %# P is ...


5

Levenberg-Marquardt.NET by Krzysztof Kniaz has worked very well for me.



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