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0

If you are looking for a really simple method to assign importance weights, you could use the sum of the square of the correlations, although this does not take into account multicollinearity - but alot easier to programme.


0

With the help of user3235916 I have managed to write down following piece of code: import numpy as np measuredData = np.array(yvalues['int1']) calibrationData = np.array(yvalues['int0']) A = np.vstack( [measuredData, np.ones(len(measuredData))]).T gain,offset = np.linalg.lstsq(A, calibrationData)[0] Then I could use following transformation to get the ...


3

The error message can be reproduced like this: import numpy as np import scipy.integrate as integrate xup = np.random.random(10) def calka(x, OmM): return 1./math.sqrt(OmM*(1.+x)**3 + (1.-OmM)) # Passing a scalar value, 10, for the upper limit is fine: integrate.quad(calka, 0., 10, args=(0.25,)) # (2.3520760256393554, 1.9064918795817483e-12) # ...


0

if (b != Inf and a != -Inf): This is trying to perform a Python if operation, but (b != Inf and a != -Inf) is returning an array of boolean values, rather than one True/False value. If this was your own code you could add np.any(...) to combine the values. But in this context I suspect that problem is that either a or b is an array, when it should be a ...


0

Solve This is a solution of the minimization problem sum{i}(Ax + By + Cz + D) -> min We can rewrite this expression as: sum{i} [A^2 x^2 + B^2 y^2 + C^2 z^2 + D^2 + 2ABxy + 2ACxz + 2ADx + 2BCyz + 2BDy + 2CDz] -> min to minimize it we find partial derivatives d/dA, d/dB, d/dC, d/dD and make them equal to zero. The result is a linear system as seen in the ...


0

If you are happy with a solution of the form measuredData = calibration data*gain + offset finding a solution in simply a linear regression problem. This is probably best solved using the normal equation, which will give you a fit that minimises the sum of squares error, which is what I think you are after. Concretely, in python I guess the solution ...


0

If the two signals are supposed to be the same shape, just y-shifted and y-scaled, you should find that gain = std_dev(measured) / std_dev(calibration) offset = average(calibration - (measured / gain))


2

Notice that your model is actually linear, we can use a trigonometric identity to show that. To use a nonlinear model use nlinfit. Using your data I wrote the following script to compute and compare the different methods: (you can comment out the opts.RobustWgtFun = 'bisquare'; line to see that it's exactly like the linear fit with the 12 periodicity) % y ...


0

For a set of euqations Ax=b, the x that yields least square error is pseudo-inverse of A times b. In Matlab command, it's x_hat = pinv(A) * b To obtain L2 distance of Ax and b, use norm norm(A*x_hat - b)


2

Three things are happening in the line you called #Point of error: You are multiplying values, adding values and applying the sin() function. "Unsupported operand type" means something is wrong in one of these operations. It means you need to verify the types of the operands, and also make sure you know what function is being applied. Are you sure you ...



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