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487

There are a number of ways to do what you want. To add to what @inalis and @Navi already said, you can use the bbox_to_anchor keyword argument to place the legend partially outside the axes and/or decrease the font size. Before you consider decreasing the font size (which can make things awfully hard to read), try playing around with placing the legend in ...


130

You can set an individual font size for the legend by adjusting the 'prop' keyword. plot.legend(loc=2,prop={'size':6}) This takes a dictionary of keywords corresponding to matplotlib.font_manager.FontProperties properties. See the documentation for legend: Keyword arguments: prop: [ None | FontProperties | dict ] A ...


67

You can easily add a second legend by adding the line: ax2.legend(loc=0) You'll get this: But if you want all labels on one legend then you should do something like this: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from matplotlib import rc rc('mathtext', default='regular') time = np.arange(10) temp = np.random.random(10)*30 Swdown = ...


64

Sorry EMS, but I actually just got another response from the matplotlib mailling list (Thanks goes out to Benjamin Root). The code I am looking for is adjusting the savefig call to: fig.savefig('samplefigure', bbox_extra_artists=(lgd,), bbox_inches='tight') #Note that the bbox_extra_artists must be an iterable This is apparently similar to calling ...


53

I know this is an old question, but I got this page when I googled "fieldset legend position", and I really couldn't find a good answer. The legend just won't behave!, so the best solution I found was to position it absolute and have a padding top on the fieldset. JSFildle example: http://jsfiddle.net/carlosmartinezt/gtNnT/356/ fieldset { ...


44

No one has mentioned using negative inset values for legend. Here is an example, where the legend is to the right of the plot, aligned to the top (using keyword "topright"). # Random data to plot: A <- data.frame(x=rnorm(100, 20, 2), y=rnorm(100, 20, 2)) B <- data.frame(x=rnorm(100, 21, 1), y=rnorm(100, 21, 1)) # Add extra space to right of plot ...


43

Since @Etienne asked how to do this without melting the data (which in general is the preferred method, but I recognize there may be some cases where that is not possible), I present the following alternative. Start with a subset of the original data: datos <- structure(list(fecha = structure(c(1317452400, 1317538800, 1317625200, 1317711600, ...


41

In the legend command you can use the scatterpoints option: ax.legend(loc=0, scatterpoints = 1) For a normal plot, it is the option numpoints. Here you can find more information about the keyword arguments for the legend: http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/api/pyplot_api.html#matplotlib.pyplot.legend


39

Create font properties from matplotlib.font_manager import FontProperties fontP = FontProperties() fontP.set_size('small') legend([plot1], "title", prop = fontP)


37

Maybe what you need is par(xpd=TRUE) to enable things to be drawn outside the plot region. So if you do the main plot with bty='L' you'll have some space on the right for a legend. Normally this would get clipped to the plot region, but do par(xpd=TRUE) and with a bit of adjustment you can get a legend as far right as it can go: set.seed(1) # just to get ...


37

I'm not sure if this functionality is new, but you can also use the get_legend_handles_labels() method rather than keeping track of lines and labels yourself: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from matplotlib import rc rc('mathtext', default='regular') pi = np.pi # fake data time = np.linspace (0, 25, 50) temp = 50 / np.sqrt (2 * pi * ...


37

if you don't want to show the series names in the legend you can disable it by setting showInLegend:false. ex: series: [{ showInLegend: false, name: "<b><?php echo $title; ?></b>", data: [<?php echo $yaxis; ?>], }] You get other options here. legend options other chart options


36

Global title: In newer releases of matplotlib one can use Figure.suptitle(). from pylab import * fig = gcf() fig.suptitle("Title centered above all subplots", fontsize=14)


33

The answer to your question is related to two other SO questions. The answer to How to pick a new color for each plotted line within a figure in matplotlib? explains how to define the default list of colors that is cycled through to pick the next color to plot. This is done with the Axes.set_color_cycle method. You want to get the correct list of colors ...


32

To change line width only in the legend you should use function guides() and then for colour= use guide_legend() with override.aes= and set size=. This will override size used in plot and will use new size value just for legend. ggplot(iris,aes(Petal.Width,Petal.Length,color=Species))+geom_line()+theme_bw()+ guides(colour = guide_legend(override.aes ...


30

I believe you are looking for the fieldset HTML tag, which you can then style with CSS. E.g., <fieldset style="border: 1px black solid"> <legend style="border: 1px black solid; margin-left: 1em; padding: 0.2em 0.8em ">title</legend> Text within the box <br /> Etc </fieldset>


26

df1 <- read.table(text="group x y group1 -0.212201 0.358867 group2 -0.279756 -0.126194 group3 0.186860 -0.203273 group4 0.417117 -0.002592 group1 -0.212201 0.358867 group2 -0.279756 -0.126194 group3 0.186860 -0.203273 group4 0.186860 -0.203273",header=TRUE) df2 <- read.table(text="group x y group1 0.211826 -0.306214 group2 ...


25

You can use: legend: { itemStyle: { width: 90 // or whatever }, } And Highcharts will wrap the items for you.


25

I tend to find that if I'm specifying individual colours in multiple geom's, I'm doing it wrong. Here's how I would plot your data: ##Subset the necessary columns dd_sub = datos[,c(20, 2,3,5)] ##Then rearrange your data frame dd = melt(dd_sub, id=c("fecha")) All that's left is a simple ggplot command: ggplot(dd) + geom_line(aes(x=fecha, y=value, ...


24

You could use the legend's set_visible method: ax.legend().set_visible(False) draw() This is based on a answer provided to me in response to a similar question I had some time ago here (Thanks for that answer Jouni - I'm sorry I was unable to mark the question as answered... perhaps someone who has the authority can do so for me?)


23

Use option bty = "n" in legend to remove the box around the legend. For example: legend(1, 5, "This legend text should not be disturbed by the dotted grey lines,\nbut the plotted dots should still be visible", bty = "n")


22

2D scatter plot Using the scatter method of the matplotlib.pyplot module should work (at least with matplotlib 1.2.1 with Python 2.7.5), as in the example code below. Also, if you are using scatter plots, use scatterpoints=1 rather than numpoints=1 in the legend call to have only one point for each legend entry. In the code below I've used random values ...


22

Unfortunately it's a bug in ggplot2 which I really really hope to fix this summer. Update The bug involving opts(legend.position = "left") has been fixed using the most current version of ggplot2. In addition, version 0.9.0 saw the introduction of guide_legend and guide_colorbar which allow much finer control over the appearance and positioning of items ...


21

Nowadays you can simply use legend.direction="horizontal". For instance: qplot(carat, price, data=diamonds, colour=color) + opts(legend.position="top", legend.direction="horizontal")


20

This happened to me all the time. The trick is knowing that aes() maps data to aesthetics. If there's no data to map (e.g., if you have a single value that you determine), there's no reason to use aes(). I believe that only things inside of an aes() will show up in your legend. Furthermore, when you specify mappings inside of ggplot(aes()), those ...


19

Here's a simple example of how to do it: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # make some data x = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi) y1 = np.sin(x) y2 = np.cos(x) # plot sin(x) and cos(x) p1 = plt.plot(x, y1, 'b-', linewidth=1.0) p2 = plt.plot(x, y2, 'r-', linewidth=1.0) # make a legend for both plots leg = plt.legend([p1, p2], ['sin(x)', 'cos(x)'], ...


19

If you rather prefer to place the legend interactively/manually rather than programmatically, you can toggle the draggable mode of the legend so that you can drag it to wherever you want. Check the example below: import matplotlib.pylab as plt import numpy as np #define the figure and get an axes instance fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) #plot ...


19

There's a section in the matplotlib documentation on that exact subject: http://matplotlib.org/users/legend_guide.html#multiple-legend Here's code for your specific example: import itertools from matplotlib import pyplot colors = ['b', 'r', 'g', 'c'] cc = itertools.cycle(colors) plot_lines = [] for p in parameters: d1 = algo1(p) d2 = algo2(p) ...


18

You need to bind data to the nodes (rectangles and text elements) that make up the legend. Currently you get an error when trying to style rectangles: Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property '1' of undefined The reason: there's no bound data legend.append("rect") /*...*/ .style("fill", function(d) { // d <---- is undefined ...


18

Assuming your plot is saved as p p + opts( legend.position = c(0.9, 0.6), # c(0,0) bottom left, c(1,1) top-right. legend.background = theme_rect(fill = "white", colour = NA) ) If you want the legend background partially transparent, change the fill to, e.g., "#ffffffaa".



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